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Glucose

HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
To test their glucose levels, diabetics need to prick their finger and draw blood, usually several times a day. Eventually, they may have a better way. Teams of researchers around the country are working on noninvasive ways to monitor blood sugar. One of the most intriguing approaches would use a glucose sensor built into a contact lens.
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HEALTH
December 30, 2002 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Many diabetics check their blood glucose levels several times a day, but they've had to visit a doctor for a test to determine whether the disease is under control. Now, they'll be able to buy that test without a prescription for use at home. The test, approved for over-the-counter sale earlier this month, measures glycated hemoglobin. The substance is produced when sugar levels rise and interact with the hemoglobin in red blood cells.
HEALTH
January 28, 2002 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Sugar often gets a bad rap, but there is one kind of sugar you can't live without--glucose. It provides energy for every cell in your body. Good health depends on having just the right level of it at all times, and the level is regulated primarily by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. People with diabetes are unable to control their sugar level, however, either because their pancreas cannot make insulin or because their body is "resistant" to it.
HEALTH
May 8, 2000 | CAROL KRUCOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In today's weight room, you're as likely to see a grandmother working her glutes as a quarterback working his quads, now that resistance exercise is recognized as vital to building strong muscles and bones. But the American Heart Assn. says pumping iron is also good for that most important of muscles--the heart.
HEALTH
March 9, 1998 | MARK GUIDERA, THE BALTIMORE SUN
M. James Barrett and his lean team of scientists and engineers are hot on the trail of overcoming a challenge that has stumped medical-device makers for years: developing a fast, accurate blood-sugar monitor small enough to be implanted in diabetics. Barrett puts the task before him succinctly: "The field is littered with the dead bodies of those who have tried and failed at this."
BUSINESS
December 23, 1997
MiniMed Inc. has submitted an application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval of a glucose sensor that is inserted into the skin, an easier way of testing diabetes patients. Physicians must now draw blood from a patient several times a day to track glucose levels using traditional glucose meters and test strips. MiniMed's new system has a sensor that is inserted in the abdominal area and worn by patients for three days.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1997
MiniMed Inc. in Sylmar has reached agreement with German-based Boehringer Mannheim Corp. to develop and market a new device to be used in hospitals to manage glucose levels in patients. The device will be submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval. MiniMed is a maker of infusion systems used primarily in the treatment of diabetes.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | KATHERINE SHELLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John DeMoss is used to losing blood. In fact, the University of New Mexico technician loses some blood at least three times a day. DeMoss is a diabetic, so measuring his blood sugar level--a process that requires a sample of blood--is a regular part of his daily routine. And he says he's as interested as any diabetic would be in a device that could test his blood sugar level without drawing blood to do it.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you've just returned from a day at the beach or an afternoon bicycle ride, stop in the kitchen. Even though you may not feel hungry, it's important to replenish your body after all that sweating and activity. "Even though we tend not to feel hungry during the summer months, sound nutrition is more important than ever," says registered dietitian Becky Posada of St. Joseph Hospital in Orange. Sweating causes losses in potassium and sodium and can deplete glucose stores, which give us energy.
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