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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Marvin W. Meyer, an expert on Gnosticism and ancient texts about Jesus outside the New Testament who challenged the traditional portrayal of Judas Iscariot as the ultimate biblical villain, has died. He was 64. Meyer, whose book "The Gospel of Judas" sold more than 1.2 million copies and prompted frequent guest appearances on television documentaries and other programs, died Aug. 16 of complications from melanoma, according to his wife, Bonnie. The tanned, athletic man who wore rumpled khakis, oversized shirts and a silver hoop in his left ear "was our Indiana Jones," said James L. Doti, president of Chapman University in Orange, where Meyer held the Griset Chair in Bible and Christian Studies and was director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Marvin W. Meyer, an expert on Gnosticism and ancient texts about Jesus outside the New Testament who challenged the traditional portrayal of Judas Iscariot as the ultimate biblical villain, has died. He was 64. Meyer, whose book "The Gospel of Judas" sold more than 1.2 million copies and prompted frequent guest appearances on television documentaries and other programs, died Aug. 16 of complications from melanoma, according to his wife, Bonnie. The tanned, athletic man who wore rumpled khakis, oversized shirts and a silver hoop in his left ear "was our Indiana Jones," said James L. Doti, president of Chapman University in Orange, where Meyer held the Griset Chair in Bible and Christian Studies and was director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute.
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MAGAZINE
October 6, 2002 | AL RIDENOUR
Near the nexus of Hillhurst Avenue and Sunset and Hollywood boulevards, Bishop Stephan Hoeller has presided since 1977 at Ecclesia Gnostica, the tiny, incense-infused chapel of the Gnostic Society. Gnosticism, an ancient form of Christianity that flourished in the 1st to 3rd centuries, rejects doctrines such as original sin and emphasizes transcendence through inward, intuitive knowledge ("gnosis") of the divine spark in each individual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
THE National Geographic Society hailed it as one of the most significant archeological discoveries of our time, a 1,700-year-old text that portrayed Judas Iscariot as a hero, not a villain, for betraying Jesus. The portrayal of Judas as a favored apostle who handed Jesus over to the Romans at his master's request made National Geographic's publication of "The Gospel of Judas" -- and the companion TV documentary -- a worldwide media event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Powerful female figures in the myths of a heretical movement from Christendom's early centuries began stirring excitement among feminist academicians in the late 1970s when a large cache of such manuscripts were published. Some of the myths depicted Eve as a rape-eluding heroine in the Garden of Eden. In another, a wife of Noah named Norea burns down the "first" ark with her fiery breath.
BOOKS
August 30, 1998
Let us make the test. Say God wants you to be unhappy. That there is no good. That there are horrors in store for us if we do manage to move toward Him. Say you keep Art in its place, not too high. And that everything, even eternity, is measurable. Look at the photographs of the dead, both natural (one by one) and unnatural in masses. All tangled. You know about that. And can put Beauty in its place. Not too high, and passing. Make love our search for unhappiness, which is His plan to help us.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The familiar landscape of Los Angeles turns into something rich and strange when viewed through the eyes of an authentic visionary in "Gnostic Architecture" by Eric Owen Moss (Monacelli Press, $45, 160 pages). An architect with a global reputation, the Culver City-based Moss has chosen a building near Baldwin Hills to illustrate his own idiosyncratic notions of urban design. The label that Moss applies to his approach to architecture is drawn from the realm of religion and philosophy.
BOOKS
February 22, 1987 | D. Keith Mano, Mano's most recent novel is "Take Five" (Doubleday).
G nostic has become a fashionable tag. You commonly read about political and scientific gnosticism now. In this reduced sense, gnostic might designate an elitist group that appropriates crucial knowledge to itself. But Gnosticism, the heretical Christian doctrine, is a far more complex syndrome. One so persistent in church chronicles that you might almost suppose orthodox faith regularly extruded it.
BOOKS
December 3, 2006 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is the author of, most recently, "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
GNOSTICISM is a label applied to a collection of religious ideas that has long exerted a certain appeal to public intellectuals and controversialists, ranging from the theologian Marcion in the 2nd century AD to literary critic Harold Bloom in our time. What attracts them, I suppose, is the conviction that the highest truths are available only to a small circle of initiates -- the Greek term gnostokoi can be translated as "those who understand divine matters, knowing what the gods know."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
When National Geographic unveiled the Gospel of Judas this month, the narrator in the accompanying television documentary solemnly announced: "It tells a different story. One that could challenge our deepest beliefs." The Gospel portrayed a Judas who simply carried out his master's orders -- and did not betray him.
BOOKS
December 3, 2006 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is the author of, most recently, "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
GNOSTICISM is a label applied to a collection of religious ideas that has long exerted a certain appeal to public intellectuals and controversialists, ranging from the theologian Marcion in the 2nd century AD to literary critic Harold Bloom in our time. What attracts them, I suppose, is the conviction that the highest truths are available only to a small circle of initiates -- the Greek term gnostokoi can be translated as "those who understand divine matters, knowing what the gods know."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
When National Geographic unveiled the Gospel of Judas this month, the narrator in the accompanying television documentary solemnly announced: "It tells a different story. One that could challenge our deepest beliefs." The Gospel portrayed a Judas who simply carried out his master's orders -- and did not betray him.
WORLD
February 29, 2004 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The bride and groom emerge from the temple to climb down the slopes of a riverbank fetid with garbage, and pause at the water's edge to pray before wading in. "Please cleanse my soul of the sins of this material life," they say. Then they crouch down in the river, bow their heads to accept the cold splashes doled out by their cleric and swallow the river water he dribbles into their mouths.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 2002 | AL RIDENOUR
Near the nexus of Hillhurst Avenue and Sunset and Hollywood boulevards, Bishop Stephan Hoeller has presided since 1977 at Ecclesia Gnostica, the tiny, incense-infused chapel of the Gnostic Society. Gnosticism, an ancient form of Christianity that flourished in the 1st to 3rd centuries, rejects doctrines such as original sin and emphasizes transcendence through inward, intuitive knowledge ("gnosis") of the divine spark in each individual.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The familiar landscape of Los Angeles turns into something rich and strange when viewed through the eyes of an authentic visionary in "Gnostic Architecture" by Eric Owen Moss (Monacelli Press, $45, 160 pages). An architect with a global reputation, the Culver City-based Moss has chosen a building near Baldwin Hills to illustrate his own idiosyncratic notions of urban design. The label that Moss applies to his approach to architecture is drawn from the realm of religion and philosophy.
BOOKS
August 30, 1998
Let us make the test. Say God wants you to be unhappy. That there is no good. That there are horrors in store for us if we do manage to move toward Him. Say you keep Art in its place, not too high. And that everything, even eternity, is measurable. Look at the photographs of the dead, both natural (one by one) and unnatural in masses. All tangled. You know about that. And can put Beauty in its place. Not too high, and passing. Make love our search for unhappiness, which is His plan to help us.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
THE National Geographic Society hailed it as one of the most significant archeological discoveries of our time, a 1,700-year-old text that portrayed Judas Iscariot as a hero, not a villain, for betraying Jesus. The portrayal of Judas as a favored apostle who handed Jesus over to the Romans at his master's request made National Geographic's publication of "The Gospel of Judas" -- and the companion TV documentary -- a worldwide media event.
WORLD
February 29, 2004 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
The bride and groom emerge from the temple to climb down the slopes of a riverbank fetid with garbage, and pause at the water's edge to pray before wading in. "Please cleanse my soul of the sins of this material life," they say. Then they crouch down in the river, bow their heads to accept the cold splashes doled out by their cleric and swallow the river water he dribbles into their mouths.
BOOKS
February 22, 1987 | D. Keith Mano, Mano's most recent novel is "Take Five" (Doubleday).
G nostic has become a fashionable tag. You commonly read about political and scientific gnosticism now. In this reduced sense, gnostic might designate an elitist group that appropriates crucial knowledge to itself. But Gnosticism, the heretical Christian doctrine, is a far more complex syndrome. One so persistent in church chronicles that you might almost suppose orthodox faith regularly extruded it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Powerful female figures in the myths of a heretical movement from Christendom's early centuries began stirring excitement among feminist academicians in the late 1970s when a large cache of such manuscripts were published. Some of the myths depicted Eve as a rape-eluding heroine in the Garden of Eden. In another, a wife of Noah named Norea burns down the "first" ark with her fiery breath.
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