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NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Irene Lechowitzky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Many cities offer concert series, but few can compete with the Rose City for the most intriguing venue. The Oregon Zoo in Portland is hosting a full menagerie of top-notch acts this summer in its outdoor amphitheater. The zoo series is surprisingly inexpensive, considering the talent on the roster, which includes many Grammy winners. Tickets cost $14 to $39, depending on the act. Many of the most desirable shows are in the mid-$20s, such as Los Lobos with Los Lonely Boy (Sunday)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Here's how I am afraid "Mad Men" will end next year: With Jon Hamm's Don Draper in a white suit, heading to Studio 54. Here's how I hope it will end: The whole series is revealed to be a story told by Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in a Ventura County sweat lodge. It may seem morbid to contemplate the demise of a show that has so inarguably changed the nature of television for the better. Just when we seemed doomed to death by reality programming, AMC's "Mad Men" proved that smart, stylish television could drive the cultural conversation as effectively as any Kardashian.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991
Junk bonds, once the darlings of finance during the go-go 1980s, are now the bane of many a weary investor. No one knows this better than the hundreds of thousands of policyholders of Executive Life Insurance Co. They face months, even years, of uncertainty about the value of their policies and annuities as California regulators try to undo the biggest failure of a U.S. insurer.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Irene Lechowitzky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Many cities offer concert series, but few can compete with the Rose City for the most intriguing venue. The Oregon Zoo in Portland is hosting a full menagerie of top-notch acts this summer in its outdoor amphitheater. The zoo series is surprisingly inexpensive, considering the talent on the roster, which includes many Grammy winners. Tickets cost $14 to $39, depending on the act. Many of the most desirable shows are in the mid-$20s, such as Los Lobos with Los Lonely Boy (Sunday)
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staggering net losses, forced asset sales and bankruptcy weren't part of the game plan in the late 1980s when executives at three Orange County restaurant companies accumulated $1.2 billion in debt that funded a string of high-profile acquisitions. Rather, officials at American Restaurant Group, Del Taco Inc.
BOOKS
April 27, 2003 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short story collection "Stealing the Fire" and a contributing editor to Parade magazine.
Only a writer of consummate craftsmanship and scope could write a novel about a series of real estate deals in a small town an hour and a half from New York City and make it so fully satisfying as to be thrilling. Jane Smiley has done it. Smiley won a Pulitzer Prize for 1991's "A Thousand Acres," a novel regarded as "King Lear on the prairie," about the deterioration of an Iowa farm family.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
THIS was a boom you could actually hear. Steam trains rumbled in from the East, from the Midwest, from the mining camps of Arizona and from the grand metropolis of San Francisco. Sometimes four a day, they disgorged fresh legions of dreamers and schemers. Before it was over, circus elephants trumpeted in parades down the once tranquil streets. Brass bands, like so many pied pipers, led crowds into orange groves. Marchers carried banners.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Here's how I am afraid "Mad Men" will end next year: With Jon Hamm's Don Draper in a white suit, heading to Studio 54. Here's how I hope it will end: The whole series is revealed to be a story told by Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in a Ventura County sweat lodge. It may seem morbid to contemplate the demise of a show that has so inarguably changed the nature of television for the better. Just when we seemed doomed to death by reality programming, AMC's "Mad Men" proved that smart, stylish television could drive the cultural conversation as effectively as any Kardashian.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When Tim Ebner opens the door of his Atwater bungalow, his hands are covered in bright blue paint. Little smudges and stains of color dot every room of his house. In the rearmost bedroom, which he uses as a studio, those smudges and stains have accumulated to nearly cover the walls. With a rather fiendish grin, Ebner says: "The old lady who owned the house before me was so tidy, everything was in perfect condition when I moved in."
IMAGE
March 31, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Mother-daughter designing duo Marie and Kelly Gray are back in business together with a new label called Grayse, eight years after stepping down from their day-to-day duties at St. John when a private equity firm bought the company and cleaned house in a rebranding effort that famously also involved hiring Angelina Jolie as spokesmodel and alienating hordes of loyal customers. Although St. John is best known for creating the conservative, Crayola-colored knit suit uniform worn by a generation of women in the go-go 1980s and '90s, Grayse taps into the more recent trend of casual luxury and seasonless, day-to-night dressing.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
THIS was a boom you could actually hear. Steam trains rumbled in from the East, from the Midwest, from the mining camps of Arizona and from the grand metropolis of San Francisco. Sometimes four a day, they disgorged fresh legions of dreamers and schemers. Before it was over, circus elephants trumpeted in parades down the once tranquil streets. Brass bands, like so many pied pipers, led crowds into orange groves. Marchers carried banners.
BOOKS
April 27, 2003 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short story collection "Stealing the Fire" and a contributing editor to Parade magazine.
Only a writer of consummate craftsmanship and scope could write a novel about a series of real estate deals in a small town an hour and a half from New York City and make it so fully satisfying as to be thrilling. Jane Smiley has done it. Smiley won a Pulitzer Prize for 1991's "A Thousand Acres," a novel regarded as "King Lear on the prairie," about the deterioration of an Iowa farm family.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When Tim Ebner opens the door of his Atwater bungalow, his hands are covered in bright blue paint. Little smudges and stains of color dot every room of his house. In the rearmost bedroom, which he uses as a studio, those smudges and stains have accumulated to nearly cover the walls. With a rather fiendish grin, Ebner says: "The old lady who owned the house before me was so tidy, everything was in perfect condition when I moved in."
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staggering net losses, forced asset sales and bankruptcy weren't part of the game plan in the late 1980s when executives at three Orange County restaurant companies accumulated $1.2 billion in debt that funded a string of high-profile acquisitions. Rather, officials at American Restaurant Group, Del Taco Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991
Junk bonds, once the darlings of finance during the go-go 1980s, are now the bane of many a weary investor. No one knows this better than the hundreds of thousands of policyholders of Executive Life Insurance Co. They face months, even years, of uncertainty about the value of their policies and annuities as California regulators try to undo the biggest failure of a U.S. insurer.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2007 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
His office looks more like it belongs to a New Age guru than a type-A chief executive crusading to save one of Hollywood's most storied movie studios. Dozens of crystals, an amethyst cluster as big as a boulder, an amber lion, running-water sculptures and other talismans populate his corner suite at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.'s headquarters in Century City. Shortly after becoming chairman and chief executive 18 months ago, Harry E.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Charlotte Stoudt
If you'd like to see some men getting naked to defend the Constitution, “The Deep Throat Sex Scandal,” now at the Zephyr Theatre, is just the ticket. Equal parts parody, courtroom drama and R-rated pep rally, David Bertolino's '70s docu-romp ends up playing as less than the sum of its parts. Which, just to be clear, are full frontal. The story of how a $25,000 porn film became a multimillion-dollar box office hit and a culture watershed has been repeatedly told in recent years: There's the terrific documentary “Inside Deep Throat,” the underappreciated “Lovelace: The Rock Opera” by the Go-Go's Charlotte Caffey and the upcoming Linda Lovelace biopic with Amanda Seyfried.
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