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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991
Junk bonds, once the darlings of finance during the go-go 1980s, are now the bane of many a weary investor. No one knows this better than the hundreds of thousands of policyholders of Executive Life Insurance Co. They face months, even years, of uncertainty about the value of their policies and annuities as California regulators try to undo the biggest failure of a U.S. insurer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Here's how I am afraid "Mad Men" will end next year: With Jon Hamm's Don Draper in a white suit, heading to Studio 54. Here's how I hope it will end: The whole series is revealed to be a story told by Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in a Ventura County sweat lodge. It may seem morbid to contemplate the demise of a show that has so inarguably changed the nature of television for the better. Just when we seemed doomed to death by reality programming, AMC's "Mad Men" proved that smart, stylish television could drive the cultural conversation as effectively as any Kardashian.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staggering net losses, forced asset sales and bankruptcy weren't part of the game plan in the late 1980s when executives at three Orange County restaurant companies accumulated $1.2 billion in debt that funded a string of high-profile acquisitions. Rather, officials at American Restaurant Group, Del Taco Inc.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
THIS was a boom you could actually hear. Steam trains rumbled in from the East, from the Midwest, from the mining camps of Arizona and from the grand metropolis of San Francisco. Sometimes four a day, they disgorged fresh legions of dreamers and schemers. Before it was over, circus elephants trumpeted in parades down the once tranquil streets. Brass bands, like so many pied pipers, led crowds into orange groves. Marchers carried banners.
BOOKS
April 27, 2003 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short story collection "Stealing the Fire" and a contributing editor to Parade magazine.
Only a writer of consummate craftsmanship and scope could write a novel about a series of real estate deals in a small town an hour and a half from New York City and make it so fully satisfying as to be thrilling. Jane Smiley has done it. Smiley won a Pulitzer Prize for 1991's "A Thousand Acres," a novel regarded as "King Lear on the prairie," about the deterioration of an Iowa farm family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Here's how I am afraid "Mad Men" will end next year: With Jon Hamm's Don Draper in a white suit, heading to Studio 54. Here's how I hope it will end: The whole series is revealed to be a story told by Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in a Ventura County sweat lodge. It may seem morbid to contemplate the demise of a show that has so inarguably changed the nature of television for the better. Just when we seemed doomed to death by reality programming, AMC's "Mad Men" proved that smart, stylish television could drive the cultural conversation as effectively as any Kardashian.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
THIS was a boom you could actually hear. Steam trains rumbled in from the East, from the Midwest, from the mining camps of Arizona and from the grand metropolis of San Francisco. Sometimes four a day, they disgorged fresh legions of dreamers and schemers. Before it was over, circus elephants trumpeted in parades down the once tranquil streets. Brass bands, like so many pied pipers, led crowds into orange groves. Marchers carried banners.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When Tim Ebner opens the door of his Atwater bungalow, his hands are covered in bright blue paint. Little smudges and stains of color dot every room of his house. In the rearmost bedroom, which he uses as a studio, those smudges and stains have accumulated to nearly cover the walls. With a rather fiendish grin, Ebner says: "The old lady who owned the house before me was so tidy, everything was in perfect condition when I moved in."
MAGAZINE
August 17, 1986 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Michael A. Hiltzik is a Times financial writer based in New York
The financial page is howling about yet another corporate raid, one more takeover at tempt destined to produce nothing much more lasting than speculation, creative financing, a raft of lawsuits and millions for the Wall Street types to whom value is something expressed in a blinking green light on a Quotron machine.
IMAGE
March 31, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Mother-daughter designing duo Marie and Kelly Gray are back in business together with a new label called Grayse, eight years after stepping down from their day-to-day duties at St. John when a private equity firm bought the company and cleaned house in a rebranding effort that famously also involved hiring Angelina Jolie as spokesmodel and alienating hordes of loyal customers. Although St. John is best known for creating the conservative, Crayola-colored knit suit uniform worn by a generation of women in the go-go 1980s and '90s, Grayse taps into the more recent trend of casual luxury and seasonless, day-to-night dressing.
BOOKS
April 27, 2003 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short story collection "Stealing the Fire" and a contributing editor to Parade magazine.
Only a writer of consummate craftsmanship and scope could write a novel about a series of real estate deals in a small town an hour and a half from New York City and make it so fully satisfying as to be thrilling. Jane Smiley has done it. Smiley won a Pulitzer Prize for 1991's "A Thousand Acres," a novel regarded as "King Lear on the prairie," about the deterioration of an Iowa farm family.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When Tim Ebner opens the door of his Atwater bungalow, his hands are covered in bright blue paint. Little smudges and stains of color dot every room of his house. In the rearmost bedroom, which he uses as a studio, those smudges and stains have accumulated to nearly cover the walls. With a rather fiendish grin, Ebner says: "The old lady who owned the house before me was so tidy, everything was in perfect condition when I moved in."
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staggering net losses, forced asset sales and bankruptcy weren't part of the game plan in the late 1980s when executives at three Orange County restaurant companies accumulated $1.2 billion in debt that funded a string of high-profile acquisitions. Rather, officials at American Restaurant Group, Del Taco Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991
Junk bonds, once the darlings of finance during the go-go 1980s, are now the bane of many a weary investor. No one knows this better than the hundreds of thousands of policyholders of Executive Life Insurance Co. They face months, even years, of uncertainty about the value of their policies and annuities as California regulators try to undo the biggest failure of a U.S. insurer.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Where were you in 1972--the last time interest rates were this low? In that turbulent year, the Federal Reserve continued to push rates down to bolster the economy: The rate on three-month Treasury bills fell from a high of 7.81% in 1969 to a 4.07% annual average in 1972--virtually the same decline that we've had between 1989 and today. The Fed's rate tonic worked then: The economy's growth rate rebounded from a negative 0.3% in 1970 to 2.8% in 1971 and 5.0% in 1972.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is the very model of the modern self-made millionaire. Standing on the front steps of his Brentwood manse, overseeing construction of the new garden that will bloom where once his next-door neighbor's house stood, he is tanned and fit and, at 56, young to possess such wealth from his own earnings. But Richard Atlas is one of many who reaped the benefits of the go-go '80s and survived the leaner years that followed.
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