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April 2, 2006 | Debra J. Miller, Debra J. Miller teaches English at a private high school in Los Angeles.
On Thursday, Oct. 8, 1964, the day the police decided my mother killed my father, I woke up late, the kind of late that snaps you out of your favorite dream, the one where you're wrapped in the arms of your favorite TV hunk--mine was Dr. Kildare--and he's just about to . . . when bang your unconscious tells you the sun is out, the lights are on all over the house and you're going to be late for school because nobody got you out of bed. We were a family of five. I was 14 and the oldest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
The father of a 15-year-old boy who stowed away in the wheel-well of a Hawaii-bound plane "thanked God" his son survived the ordeal, saying the boy may have been trying to return to Africa, according to the Voice of America . “When I watched the analysis about the extraordinary and dangerous trip of my son on local TVs and that Allah had saved him, I thanked God and I was very happy,” Abdilahi Yusuf Abdi, of Santa Clara, told VOA's Somali...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all seemed too good to be true. A candle to bring me the love of my life? A prayer to bring me success? Tarot cards that would tell my future? The promises of the curandera struck me as absurd. But here, in a Latino neighborhood where immigrants bring with them old customs, you don't want to dismiss them too lightly. Curanderos, or healers, practice a mix of Spanish, Native American, Greek and Arabic traditions dating to the Mayan and Incan civilizations.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An anonymous family of New Jersey atheists is asking a state judge to find that the words “under God” should be stricken from the Pledge of Allegiance. The lawsuit , filed Monday, is nearly identical to one brought in Massachusetts by an unidentified family there. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court could rule in that case any day. “Public schools should not engage in an exercise that tells students that patriotism is tied to a belief in God,” said David Niose, an attorney for the American Humanist Assn.
OPINION
July 18, 2011 | By J. Anderson Thomson and Clare Aukofer
Before John Lennon imagined "living life in peace," he conjured "no heaven … / no hell below us …/ and no religion too. " No religion: What was Lennon summoning? For starters, a world without "divine" messengers, like Osama bin Laden, sparking violence. A world where mistakes, like the avoidable loss of life in Hurricane Katrina, would be rectified rather than chalked up to "God's will. " Where politicians no longer compete to prove who believes more strongly in the irrational and untenable.
OPINION
November 24, 2009 | By David Masci
Today, a century and a half after Charles Darwin published "On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection," the overwhelming majority of scientists in the United States accept Darwinian evolution as the basis for understanding how life on Earth developed. But although evolutionary theory is often portrayed as antithetical to religion, it has not destroyed the religious faith of the scientific community. According to a survey of members of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, conducted by the Pew Research Center in May and June this year, a majority of scientists (51%)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000
I have a faith that science will someday prove the existence of God. LIONEL DE LEON Garden Grove
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2010
'Letters to God' MPAA rating: PG for thematic material Running time: 1 hour, 50 minutes Playing: In limited release
OPINION
October 27, 2012
Re "Sis boom bad ruling," Editorial, Oct. 24 So much for the adage, "There's a time and a place for everything. " There was a time, not too many decades ago, when posting Bible verses around football stadiums would have been considered blasphemous. Fine, then, free speech cuts both ways. Let's start seeing some football posters on church walls and copies of Sports Illustrated in the pews and hearing some play-by-play commentary during sermons. Maybe during a dull spot in the service we can choose sides and get in a quick game; the pews can be yard markers.
OPINION
May 18, 2012
Re "An evolving vote," Opinion, May 13 Many Christians believe that the golden rule, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," originates in the Bible. They are wrong. The 4,000-year old Hindu Anusasana Parva says, "One should never do that to another which one regards as injurious to one's own self. " Similar statements are found worldwide. The nonsectarian, worldwide golden rule precedes all modern religions, providing a window into an antiquity when behavioral rules were not backed by a god's will.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2014 | By Matt Pearce and Will Webber
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - When tragedy came in the form of a gunman to a Jewish community center here Sunday, it was two Methodists who were shot and killed in the building's parking lot. Reat Underwood, a 14-year-old high school freshman, had come to the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City with his grandfather, Dr. William Lewis Corporan, 69, who was always accompanying one of his grandkids to some event or another. Reat, a Boy Scout, loved to sing and perform in musicals, and after years of waiting to become eligible, he had come to audition for a local "American Idol"-style competition for high school students.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Randall Wallace didn't expect a rock-star reception when he went on the road to promote his faith-based drama "Heaven Is for Real" ahead of its Easter-weekend release. Yet at the First Assembly of God Church in Phoenix, 9,000 congregants greeted the filmmaker with a standing ovation. A few days later, 11,000 boisterous students packed a convocation in the sports arena at Liberty University, a Christian college in Lynchburg, Va., where Wallace, best known for writing the 1995 battle biopic "Braveheart" and directing the equestrian drama "Secretariat," spoke about "Heaven Is for Real.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | Times staff and wire reports
Phyllis Frelich, a deaf actress who received a Tony award in 1980 for her performance in "Children of a Lesser God," has died at her Temple City home. She was 70. The cause of her death Thursday was progressive supranuclear palsy, her husband, Robert Steinberg, said. PSP is a rare neurological condition that also took the life of actor Dudley Moore in 2002. Born Feb. 29, 1944, in Devils Lake, N.D., Frelich was one of nine deaf children. Her parents were deaf as well. Credited with paving the way for other deaf performers, she never dreamed of acting until attending Gallaudet College, a school for the deaf in Washington, D.C. "The dream was to get out of wherever you were and meet and mingle with the cream of the deaf world, all together in one place," she told The Times in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Preaching to the choir may not impress movie critics, but it seems to work at the box office, if the success of the micro-budget Christian movie "God's Not Dead" is any indication. The indie film about a college student who debates his atheist professor about the existence of God has grossed about $35 million in ticket sales so far, making it one of the biggest surprises of the year, with little sign of stopping as it enters its fourth weekend in theaters.  In a landscape dominated by dystopian teen sci-fi and Marvel superheroes, that may not seem like a lot of money, but in terms of religious films, it's big -- especially considering "God's Not Dead" cost less than $3 million to make.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Dreadfully earnest about its politics in the manner of John Sayles at his preachiest, the indie historical thriller "No God, No Master" draws a line from the civil unrest of 1920s anti-immigrant America to today's terror-besotted society that's so obvious, a freshman napping in social studies class couldn't miss it. Writer-director Terry Green packs his tale of exploding bombs, striking workers, anarchist cells and overreacting U.S. authorities with...
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - A broken leg. A shattered ankle. A broken arm. A fractured eye socket. And a memory of terror that will be with her forever, its soundtrack an "unexplainable" noise "that will never get out of my head. " That is what Amanda Skorjanc, 25, remembers after the March 22 Oso landslide that destroyed her home, almost wiped her little town off the map and nearly killed her infant son, Duke Suddarth, who was 22 weeks old when the disaster struck. At least 36 people were killed and 10 others remain missing.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa -- South African Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius told Pretoria's high court Monday that his religious faith had gotten him through the past year after he shot and killed his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. “It's definitely the thing that has got me through this past year,” Pistorius told the court. “My God's my God of refuge.” In an emotional day that saw Pistorius take the witness stand for the first time, his voice cracked repeatedly while talking about Steenkamp and his mother, who died when he was 15. He broke down in the morning, listening to testimony from a pathologist, Jan Botha, about Steenkamp's injuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012
'God Is the Bigger Elvis' Where: HBO When: 8 p.m. Thursday Rating: Not rated
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa -- South African Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius told Pretoria's high court Monday that his religious faith had gotten him through the past year after he shot and killed his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. “It's definitely the thing that has got me through this past year,” Pistorius told the court. “My God's my God of refuge.” In an emotional day that saw Pistorius take the witness stand for the first time, his voice cracked repeatedly while talking about Steenkamp and his mother, who died when he was 15. He broke down in the morning, listening to testimony from a pathologist, Jan Botha, about Steenkamp's injuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By David. L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Barbara Ehrenreich never meant to write a memoir. "It seems very self-involved," she says by phone from her home in Arlington, Va. "I have anxiety about it. " That anxiety is heightened at the moment because her new book, "Living With a Wild God: A Nonbeliever's Search for the Truth About Everything" (Twelve: 240 pp., $26), is as personal a piece of writing as she has ever done, built around a journal from her teenage years that traces both a spiritual quest and a youthful mystical experience, each having to do with "an impression of intention" - the sense that there is some underlying shape or meaning to the universe.
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