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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Last year, a couple walking the usual route around their California Gold Country property happened upon a can sticking out of the ground. They pulled it out and uncovered seven others, all filled with hundreds of U.S. gold coins. Experts announced the find last month after a year of work researching and authenticating the 1,427 coins, worth an estimated $10 million. But the origin of the Saddle Ridge hoard remains a tantalizing mystery, one that has coin buffs and amateur sleuths on the case.
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NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Here is a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. 'Free' gas - A federal judge has ordered a company to stop a marketing scheme in which consumers were promised "free gas for life" if they purchased a book online, the Federal Trade Commission said. Consumers who attempted to buy the book ended up being charged a monthly fee for an online magazine and did not receive the promised free gasoline, the FTC said. Under the court order, the Green Millionaire website can no longer offer "free" products and must clearly disclose how much consumers will be charged for its products.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
“Gold fever” is still alive, a California historian said after last week's discovery of more than 1,400 coins buried on a Northern California couple's gold country property. The historic find, believed to be the most valuable in North America, has had people around the world buzzing since the announcement by numismatic firm Kagin's Inc., which evaluated the hoard and is representing the couple. “There's something about gold, ever since the days of legendary King Midas, it's just incredible people's response to this,” said Gary Kurutz, director of special collections at the California State Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014
The Northern California couple who found rare gold coins in eight tin cans buried on their property said they will donate some of the proceeds to charity. John and Mary came upon the $28,000 in U.S. gold coins last year on their daily walk. When they realized what they had found, they dug a hole in their wood pile, placed the 1,400 coins in bags and boxes in an old ice chest and buried them again. The pair had walked the path on their gold country property for years before they spotted the edge of a rusty can peeking out of the moss last February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
For many years, John and Mary took daily walks along a trail on a section of their property they nicknamed Saddle Ridge.   But last year , as they were walking their dog, they noticed an old can sticking out of the dirt. Curious, they brushed away some moss, used a stick to dig it out and carried the heavy container home. And that's all it took for the couple living in California's gold country to discover a cache of 19 th -century U.S. gold coins that rare coin experts say is the greatest buried treasure ever unearthed in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
A cache of 19th century gold coins uncovered by a California couple on their daily walk could end up selling for more than $10 million, making it the  greatest buried treasure ever unearthed in the United States, experts said. Donald Kagin, president of Kagin's Inc., a  numismatic firm that specializes in U.S. gold coins,  announced the discovery Tuesday. The company is representing the couple, who wish to remain anonymous. Identified by  the firm only as "John and Mary" , the couple told Kagin they couldn't believe they had made such a big discovery and were grateful for it. They unearthed the coins after noticing an  old can sticking out of the dirt on a section of their property, the firm said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A rare cache of buried 19th century gold coins discovered by a California couple on daily walk could be hitting Amazon.com as early as May. Whatever portion of the find is put on the retail site for sale will no doubt attract great interest among rare-coin enthusiasts, who have been set abuzz by what experts are calling the most valuable find unearthed in North America. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins If the coins were melted down, the gold alone would be worth $2 million, said David Hall, co-founder of Professional Coin Grading Services in Newport Beach, who recently authenticated the coins.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1986 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD
QUESTION: Do you know whether it is true that the U.S. government is working on a new gold coin? And if it is true, what will it sell for? D. B. ANSWER: For the first time in 53 years, there is indeed a new gold coin in the making at the Treasury Department. It bears the image of Lady Liberty on one side and the American Eagle on the other and is due to go on sale Oct. 20. It will be available in four denominations: $5, $10, $25 and $50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | Samantha Schaefer
Ten paces north of the angular rock on a hill, a rusty can hangs from a tree that marks the spot. More than 100 years ago, someone chose the space below to stash away their fortune -- $28,000 in U.S. gold coins. They stayed concealed there, buried in eight tin cans, until John and Mary came upon them last year on their daily walk. They had struck gold. And when they realized it, the Northern California couple dug a hole in their wood pile, placed the 1,400 coins in bags and boxes in an old ice chest and buried them again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The California couple who stumbled on what may be the most valuable cache of gold coins ever found in North America were so taken aback that reburied them in an old ice chest until they could figure out their next step. That was the story relayed by John and Mary in an interview transcript posted by the  numismatic firm Kagin's Inc., which is representing the couple and keeping their identities confidential. The pair had walked the path on their Gold Country property for years before they spotted the edge of a rusty can peeking out of the moss last February, they told Kagin's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A rare cache of buried 19th century gold coins discovered by a California couple on daily walk could be hitting Amazon.com as early as May. Whatever portion of the find is put on the retail site for sale will no doubt attract great interest among rare-coin enthusiasts, who have been set abuzz by what experts are calling the most valuable find unearthed in North America. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins If the coins were melted down, the gold alone would be worth $2 million, said David Hall, co-founder of Professional Coin Grading Services in Newport Beach, who recently authenticated the coins.
NEWS
December 2, 1985 | From Reuters
Congress today passed and sent to President Reagan a bill authorizing the U.S. Treasury to mint gold bullion coins as competition for the South African krugerrand, whose import was banned Oct. 1 as part of a series of U.S. economic sanctions to protest apartheid. The gold coins will come in four sizes: one ounce with a face value of $50, a half-ounce valued at $25, a quarter-ounce at $10 and a tenth-ounce at $5. The coins would be the first U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The California couple who found a buried cache of 19th century gold coins say they will use the proceeds -- which experts say could amount to more than $10 million -- to hold on to their home. The couple, identified by the firm representing them only as "John" and "Mary," made the find during one of their daily walks on their property in California's gold country. Eight of the rusty cans they dug up were filled with more than 1,400 rare and perfectly preserved U.S. gold coins dating from 1847 to 1894, according to Donald Kagin, president of Kagin's Inc., a numismatic firm that specializes in U.S. gold coins and represents the couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer and Ruben Vives
One of the rare U.S. gold coins found in a cache discovered by a Northern California couple on their daily walk is the finest known coin of its type and valued around $1 million, experts said Wednesday. An 1866 $20 coin printed without the “In God We Trust” motto -- the 1866-S No Motto Double Eagle -- is the highest quality of its kind, said David Hall, cofounder of Professional Coin Grading Services in Irvine, who recently authenticated the coins. When the motto was added to the coin in 1866, some coins were still minted in San Francisco without the phrase, he said.
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