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Gold Rush

NEWS
July 23, 1989 | BRIAN S. AKRE, Associated Press
Crews have removed tainted soil near Skagway's ore terminal, but eight months after the discovery of extremely high levels of lead in the town there is no plan for cleaning homes, yards or Skagway Harbor. "It's supposed to be a cleanup, but it's a half-hearted effort," said Susan Fredricks, one of about a dozen of Skagway's 712 residents who in April formed "Get the Lead Out," which is pushing for a thorough cleanup.
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NEWS
November 2, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legal, casino-style gambling returned to the Midwest at high noon Wednesday in this Black Hills gold rush town where Wild Bill Hickok was killed as he played poker more than a 100 years ago. A bartender dressed as Hickok and a slot machine parlor manager dressed as Deadwood legend Calamity Jane signaled the start of gaming by walking down the center of Main Street firing six shooters into the air.
TRAVEL
August 28, 1988 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms are free-lance writers/photographers living in Laguna Beach.
This may be the state's prettiest and best preserved Gold Rush town. It sits at the base of pine-clad hills in a natural bowl, which miners who named the town imagined to be the crater of a dormant volcano. Thanks to being several miles away from the main Mother Lode highway, things haven't changed much since the place was all but abandoned after its boom days. Volcano's residents now number about 100, a far cry from its peak population of 10,000.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | STEVE LAWRENCE, Associated Press
The mule teams and the hill's most famous resident, Mark Twain, are long gone, but the old cabin is still there, a decaying reminder of a Gold Rush era that lingers along the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada. The roof sags and the rough-plank walls are rotting away. A metal fence surrounds the structure, supposedly a replica of the shack that Twain used for a few months in the 1860s while he gathered material for "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" and "Roughing It."
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | EDMUND D. NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to gold panning, you have your recreational speed panners and you have your unvarnished, dirt-chewing prospectors. Speed panners practice in the comfort of their backyards. Prospectors scrabble through the wilderness, scuffing knuckles and fingernails in gravelly stream beds. "Us old miners who have been in the field a long time tend to pooh-pooh the speed panners," says George Massie, president of the Gold Prospectors Assn. of America.
TRAVEL
March 13, 1988 | PAUL LASLEY and ELIZABETH HARRYMAN, Lasley and Harryman are Beverly Hills free-lance writers
Charlie's face looked creviced from countless days under the Western Australia sun. A three-day growth of stubble covered his chin. But his keen blue eyes shone with the passion of discovery. "Once you find your first 10-ounce nugget, you're hooked," he said with a toothless grin. "The one- and two-ouncers don't mean much, but once you find your first 10-ouncer, that's it."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1998 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At John Sutter's sawmill 150 years ago, the discovery of that infamous gold nugget triggered the California Gold Rush, and the rest is, well, history. To mark the momentous find, there's a bonanza of Gold Rush events this weekend designed to take you back to those rough-and-tumble days--even give you a shot at panning for gold. At Ventura's Olivas Adobe on Sunday, a re-created mining town will put a realistic spin on those heady times.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1998 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
These days, "Get Up and Get It" might be the name of vitamin supplements or the title of a book on corporate takeovers. But in the last century, especially during California's Gold Rush era, such a slogan would have been the name of a town. Such labels were intended to be inspirational, as in Gold Hill, or occasionally graphic, as in the town of Bed Bug, according to Ventura historian Richard Senate. This Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
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