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Golden Grain Macaroni Co

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BUSINESS
May 14, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
The commercial marriage between Rice-A-Roni and the City of San Francisco is over. After nearly three decades of identifying its rice side dish with San Francisco, Golden Grain Macaroni Co. has dropped cable cars and city vistas from its television advertising and dumped the "The San Francisco Treat" line from its familiar jingle. The slogan will remain on the back of a redesigned package. Golden Grain executives insist that they have nothing against San Francisco.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1991
Six sewing needles were found in Rice-A-Roni boxes opened by a woman who lives near Whittier, deputies said Monday. Sandra Welchel said she found four of the 1 3/8-inch-long needles in a casserole she made from two boxes of the rice mix. Detectives investigating her claim said they found two more needles in one of the boxes she had opened. No needles were found in four other unopened packages the woman had purchased.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1991
Six sewing needles were found in Rice-A-Roni boxes opened by a woman who lives near Whittier, deputies said Monday. Sandra Welchel said she found four of the 1 3/8-inch-long needles in a casserole she made from two boxes of the rice mix. Detectives investigating her claim said they found two more needles in one of the boxes she had opened. No needles were found in four other unopened packages the woman had purchased.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rice-A-Roni is bringing back the jingle that was once its meat and potatoes. Beginning Monday, "Rice-A-Roni, the San Francisco treat," will be sung on a TV commercial near you. If you sense it hasn't been long since you last heard it, you're right. It was only three years ago when Golden Grain Macaroni dumped the 30-year-old jingle for the side dish that was once promoted as a potato substitute.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rice-A-Roni is bringing back the jingle that was once its meat and potatoes. Beginning Monday, "Rice-A-Roni, the San Francisco treat," will be sung on a TV commercial near you. If you sense it hasn't been long since you last heard it, you're right. It was only three years ago when Golden Grain Macaroni dumped the 30-year-old jingle for the side dish that was once promoted as a potato substitute.
NEWS
May 5, 1989
Paskey Dedomenico, 78, a chocolate and macaroni magnate who made Rice-a-Roni. With his parents, Dedomenico turned a San Francisco neighborhood pasta-manufacturing firm, Golden Grain Macaroni Co., into an international food conglomerate. He became president of the firm in 1932, and moved to Seattle in 1941. In 1956, he bought Mission Macaroni Co. and, in 1959 introduced Rice-a-Roni, one of the first convenience food products in the United States. In 1960, Dedomenico bought the Ghirardelli Chocolate Co. in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1989
Two new industrial parks are under construction in the central part of the county. The Koll Co., the Newport Beach mega-developer, said it had bought the Golden Grain Macaroni Co. warehouse near Anaheim Stadium and will build 11 industrial buildings on the seven-acre site. The warehouse will be converted into another industrial building. The $10-million project on the southeast corner of Cerritos Avenue and Lewis Street in Anaheim will be called Anaheim Business Center.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA
In San Francisco, they're calling it the War of the Rices. Thomas J. Lipton Inc. fired the first shot earlier this year when it placed advertising billboards touting its line of flavored rice dishes on the sides of 24 of the city's antiquated cable cars. "Now for a real treat," the ads proclaim--a none-too-subtle dig at Rice-A-Roni, the rice dish that for years promoted itself as "the San Francisco treat." The maker of Rice-A-Roni is unamused.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Quaker Oats is looking for a buyer for Ghirardelli Chocolate Co., the venerable 137-year-old chocolate maker whose name is familiar to thousands of tourists who visit its former factory at San Francisco's Ghirardelli Square. Quaker Oats said it is selling Ghirardelli Chocolate because it doesn't fit with its other products, which include cereals, dog food and toys. "Ghirardelli is a profitable but relatively small business for Quaker," said Douglas W.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
The commercial marriage between Rice-A-Roni and the City of San Francisco is over. After nearly three decades of identifying its rice side dish with San Francisco, Golden Grain Macaroni Co. has dropped cable cars and city vistas from its television advertising and dumped the "The San Francisco Treat" line from its familiar jingle. The slogan will remain on the back of a redesigned package. Golden Grain executives insist that they have nothing against San Francisco.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1986 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Quaker Oats Co. said Tuesday that it will divest its specialty retailing businesses, including Jos. A. Bank Clothiers, a manufacturer and retailer of traditional apparel that recently opened a store in downtown Los Angeles, as well as Brookstone, which sells hard-to-find gadgets and fine housewares. William D. Smithburg, chairman and chief executive, said the decision "reflects Quaker's greater focus on its U.S. grocery and Fisher-Price (toy) businesses."
BUSINESS
June 14, 1986 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Quaker Oats agreed Friday to acquire Golden Grain Macaroni Co., the maker of Rice-A-Roni, for an undisclosed amount. Golden Grain, which is owned by the DeDomenico family, had $250 million in sales last year. The 50-year-old San Leandro company also makes Noodle-Roni, Golden Grain Pasta products, Ghiradelli Chocolates and Vernell Candy. William Maguire, a food industry analyst with Merrill Lynch in New York, said he expected Quaker to pay between $210 million and $250 million for Golden Grain.
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