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Goldman Sachs

BUSINESS
April 17, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
There comes a point in every man-made disaster when the guilty parties are identified and brought to book. That way the victims can at least snatch from the wreckage some confidence that lessons have been learned and mistakes recognized. If Friday's federal fraud lawsuit against Goldman, Sachs & Co. over its role in the subprime mortgage meltdown signals the start of that process, all we can say is: Finally . Goldman, like other big Wall Street banks, has taken the position that the crisis was something of a natural disaster.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 2010 | Times Staff and Wire Services
The U.S. attorney's office in New York is conducting a criminal investigation of Goldman Sachs & Co. over mortgage securities deals the big Wall Street firm arranged, according to the Associated Press, citing an unnamed person knowledgeable of the investigation. The person said the inquiry stems from a criminal referral by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The source spoke Thursday on condition of anonymity because the investigation is in a preliminary phase. News of the action came a day after a group of 62 House lawmakers, including Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2010 | By Walter Hamilton reporting from Los Angeles and Nathaniel Popper reporting from New York
Federal regulators accused powerhouse Goldman, Sachs & Co. of fraud Friday for peddling tainted mortgage investments, a move that could lead to more lawsuits against major banks. The civil complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission against the investment bank sent shudders through Wall Street as investors also girded for heavier regulation under proposed legislation in Congress. The suit bolsters the hand of the Obama administration, which has struggled to overcome Republican opposition to proposals for overhauling financial regulations.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2013
Mark Tercek had some horribly awkward moments after he left Goldman Sachs to run a U.S. environmental charity, the Nature Conservancy. At one of his first big staff meetings, he committed a total eco no-no by drinking from a plastic water bottle. When he got to work the next day, his new colleagues had left him a batch of reusable Klean Kanteen bottles. At about the same time, he went to a big event packed with luminaries in the environmental field and found himself face to face with Russell Train, founding director of the World Wildlife Fund in the U.S. "Who are you?"
BUSINESS
October 13, 1986
Hiroshi Mineoka, senior managing director of Sumitomo Bank, told a Federal Reserve Board hearing that "any business between the parties will be at arm's length." The Fed is conducting the hearing to determine if Sumitomo's bid to buy a 12.5% stake in Goldman, Sachs & Co. is in line with regulatory requirements. Executives of both firms said Sumitomo's interest would not give the firm any control over Goldman Sachs.
REAL ESTATE
June 9, 1985
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. has purchased the 1-million-square-foot New York headquarters building of Goldman Sachs & Co. for $310 million in cash. Under a long-term lease, Goldman Sachs will continue to occupy and manage the building, which was opened in 1983 at 85 Broad St. in the financial district. It was built on the site of the first New Amsterdam city hall, built as an inn by the Dutch East India Co. in 1641.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Greg Smith appeared on "60 Minutes" on Sunday, stirring serious interest in his book "Why I Quit Goldman Sachs," which publishes today. Smith scored a book deal after writing an explosive New York Times op-ed after leaving the company. Smith spent 12 years at Goldman Sachs, starting as an intern and working his way up to a position as a vice president. "Why I Quit Goldman Sachs" is an indictment of the investment firm's corporate culture, which, in the end, Smith found intolerable.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1999 | (Bloomberg News)
Goldman Sachs Group Inc. reported better-than-expected profit from operations of $756 million, or $1.54 a share, for the fourth quarter on gains in investment banking, a turnaround from last year's loss. In the year-ago period, when the company was still privately held, Goldman Sachs reported a loss of $8 million, 2 cents a share, partly because of losses from bond trading. The latest results beat the $1.25-a-share average forecast of 13 analysts compiled by First Call Corp.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Reporting from Washington -- Toyota Motor Corp. and Goldman Sachs were among the biggest gainers in brand image last year after a rough 2010 that saw each of them enmeshed in controversy, according to U.S. corporate brand rankings made by an online market research firm. More than 13 million product recalls in the U.S. related to sudden acceleration in Toyota vehicles starting in 2009 pummeled Toyota's image in 2010, said YouGov, a British firm that tracks brand perception daily with a panel of 2.5 million people worldwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2010 | By Michael Rothfeld, Los Angeles Times
As a main theme of his campaign for governor, Jerry Brown has attacked Wall Street bankers for fueling the nation's economic troubles. But he has avoided mentioning Goldman Sachs, the bank that is a recent focus of scrutiny, even though it is one of the biggest liabilities for Meg Whitman, the leading Republican candidate for governor, who sat on the company's board. Brown, a Democrat and California's attorney general, also has connections to Goldman, which was charged with civil fraud last week by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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