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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993
Regarding Patrick Goldstein's "Bad Accents Box" (Dec. 27) and his criticism of Gary Oldman's accent in "Bram Stoker's Dracula": Exactly what are Goldstein's credentials for evaluating a medieval Transylvanian accent? Just asking. MARY BENEDICT Sherman Oaks
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By David Colker
If Hugh Hefner strove to put a suave, air-brushed image on sexual freedom in the 1960s, rival publisher Al Goldstein was the polar opposite. Unabashedly abrasive and foul-mouthed, the cigar-chomping, obese Goldstein called his explicit magazine Screw and seemingly reveled in giving the middle-finger sign not only to his enemies but also the world at large via an 11-foot sculpture of the gesture outside his Florida home. "To be angry is to be alive," Goldstein - who aggressively championed free speech rights - said in a New Times Broward-Palm Beach interview in 2001.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2006
GOLDSTEIN'S attempt to rehabilitate Victor Salva's reputation exposes Hollywood's well-earned reputation for having no moral base ["Victor Salva's Horror Stories," June 11]. Gallons of Goldstein's crocodile tears mixed with Francis Ford Coppola's moral relativism will not wash away the stain of Salva's crime. Not even on celluloid. ROBERT MCARTHUR Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By David Ng and Kelly Scott
This story has been updated. See details below. Ann Goldstein, a former senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, resigned as director of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam Wednesday, intensifying speculation that she could be MOCA's next director. Since the departure in July of Jeffrey Deitch, Goldstein's name has been among those mentioned as a possible successor, given her history with the museum and her experience running a major art institution. A Los Angeles native, Goldstein began her museum career at MOCA, rising to senior curator over the course of 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988
Citing Geraldo Rivera in Patrick Goldstein's "Hollywood vs. the Media" article (Sept. 4) piece was like mentioning a stuffed poodle in a feature on pit bulls. NEILIA SUTHERLAND Whittier
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1989
I don't know if Goldstein has children or grandchildren, but I would highly recommend that he read some of James Dobson's books about marriage, families or children. In the long run, I believe Dobson's writings will leave a more enduring, positive effect on our society and country, perhaps even the world and future generations, than will the contents of Penthouse and Screw and other pornographic/obscene magazines or videos. Goldstein delights in putting down Dobson when Dobson has put his talents to use in helping thousands, maybe millions, of us in our challenges and struggles as parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1991
Although I found Goldstein's article thoughtful and well-written, I take exception to the premise that a movie on the Doors can't work because people's memories are too long. Rather, I think it's because people's memories are too short (from drugs? drinking? listening to Doors music that was too loud?). How else could Eve Babitz claim in 1991 to have gone to bed with Morrison (and be so quoted by Goldstein) when she stated in the 1970s in her books "Eve's Hollywood" and "Slow Days, Fast Company" that she never went to bed with Morrison (note Page 100 of "Slow Days")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993
Either Goldstein missed the point completely or didn't see the movie. Redford's character didn't "give (Demi) Moore up." She gave him up; he only let her go without a fight. Didn't Goldstein realize that she had caught on to Redford's ploy? It was she who made the decision to go, and he knew it. She was in control the entire time. The movie's message (and its question is one everyone has asked at some time, usually as a joke) is that it is too expensive to sell yourself for any price.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1997
In Patrick Goldstein's recent article on "The Game" director David Fincher, he writes that the "media-shy" Fincher "scoffs at the media's celebrity worship of film directors" and quotes Fincher thus, "I'm not interested in reading about directors. . . . I think the last time I cared what a film director had to say was when I was a kid, reading what Steven Spielberg said in Time magazine about 'Jaws.' " Yet later in the piece, Goldstein writes that Fincher "often quotes from James Cameron and Alfred Hitchcock."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By Eryn Loeb
Something Red A Novel Jennifer Gilmore Scribner: 308 pp., $25 In Jennifer Gilmore's second novel, "Something Red," people find it easier to lust after abstract notions of social change than to figure out how to implement the real thing. Set in Washington, D.C., in 1980, the book revolves around the Goldstein family -- mother Sharon, father Dennis, and teenagers Ben and Vanessa -- all of whom feel they missed out on some mythical moment when large-scale transformation was actually possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Frank Capra is best known for the three films for which he won the directing Oscar - 1934's "It Happened One Night," 1936's "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" and 1938's "You Can't Take It With You" - and the ultimate Christmas flick, 1946's "It's a Wonderful Life. " But only the most ardent Capra fanatic is familiar with his 1929 film "The Donovan Affair," the first all-talking motion picture he directed for Columbia Pictures. " Nobody knows this movie," said Bruce Goldstein, director of repertory programming at New York's Film Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Xavier Veilhan, the Paris-based artist who last year turned Richard Neutra's VDL House in Silver Lake into a startling temporary gallery and later transformed Pierre Koenig's Case Study House No. 21 into a ghostly, smoke-filled, one-night-only installation, took over John Lautner's Sheats-Goldstein residence Wednesday evening for the third installment of his “Architectones” series in L.A. Veilhan showed four works, the centerpiece of which was...
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Culinary students, listen up. It's not the most scintillating headline, but SF chef and author Joyce Goldstein 's piece " Culinary tradition needs to be taught " in the San Francisco Chronicle food pages is worth reading if you want to be a cooking professional. After recounting an episode during a class she was teaching at the Culinary Institute of America's Greystone Campus in St. Helena, Goldstein gets to the point: "I think what really surprised us was our realization that today you don't have to know about or be in love with food to attend cooking school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2013 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
It took Eddie Goldstein's dying for me to finally wear a yarmulke. Grateful for a bobby pin, I somehow kept it from slipping off as I scribbled on a notebook in a funeral chapel at a Jewish cemetery in Boyle Heights. Three days before, I had gotten an email from one of his granddaughters. "It is with a heavy heart that I email you to inform you that my grandpa (the last Jewish man of Boyle Heights) has passed today," Crystal Vargas wrote. One of his brothers showed up at the chapel on Wednesday morning, along with two Jewish nieces and a nephew.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Somewhere Between" is an apt description of where the subjects of this moving new documentary find themselves: Chinese girls emotionally divided between the Asian country in which they were born and the America in which they were raised. Since China implemented its one-child policy in 1979, 175,000 children, mostly girls, have been placed in adopted homes in 26 countries. About 80,000 ended up in the United States, and it was the notion of director Linda Goldstein Knowlton to spend three years following the lives of four of these now-teenage young women.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Stedelijk Museum has a long-standing reputation in the art world for innovation. That spirit was underscored with the 2009 choice of an American as its new director: Ann Goldstein, who was then a senior curator at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art. Goldstein was excited by the notion of presiding over the reopening of the country's most important museum of modern and contemporary art, which had been closed for renovations since 2003. Because of delays due to governmental bureaucracy, funding issues and construction problems, the museum had presented exhibitions in satellite locations around Amsterdam between 2004 and 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1986 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Investigators will pursue two deported illegal aliens to Mexico, if necessary, to question them about allegations that police used physical force to get them to confess to murders they could not have committed, a senior deputy in the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said Thursday. Steven A.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Long Beach has agreed to pay nearly $8 million to settle a lawsuit filed by a man who spent 24 years in prison after being wrongly convicted of murder based largely on the testimony of a jailhouse informant. Thomas L. Goldstein was convicted in the 1979 shotgun slaying of John McGinest. Edward Fink, the informant, testified that Goldstein confessed to the murder while they were in Long Beach Jail. A judge overturned the conviction more than two dozen years later because of concerns over Fink's credibility and because prosecutors did not tell Goldstein's attorney that they had cut a deal with Fink in a separate case.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By Eryn Loeb
Something Red A Novel Jennifer Gilmore Scribner: 308 pp., $25 In Jennifer Gilmore's second novel, "Something Red," people find it easier to lust after abstract notions of social change than to figure out how to implement the real thing. Set in Washington, D.C., in 1980, the book revolves around the Goldstein family -- mother Sharon, father Dennis, and teenagers Ben and Vanessa -- all of whom feel they missed out on some mythical moment when large-scale transformation was actually possible.
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