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Golf Balls

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no driving range at Valley Park in Hermosa Beach. There is not even a putting green. But for years now, bright white golf balls have intermittently pelted the back yards of homes nearby. They have plopped into Dorothy McNeill's swimming pool and cleared Rod Merl's back-yard fence. Not long ago, an errant chip shot took out the louvered window on Gordon Young's second floor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
At our training session, it's made clear what we must not do -- like watch the fun stuff. An official of the United States Golf Assn. shows a slide of a woman holding up her arms to hush a crowd while, behind her, a golfer swings. "As the player hits, she's facing the gallery. That's perfect," our tutor lectures a packed auditorium. "It's not a position for you to watch all the good golf." There's plenty more we are not to do too, such as have a beer on the job.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, james.peltz@latimes.com
The longest golf ball on the PGA tour these days is the Pro V1, and it's also flying off shelves at golf shops--that is, whenever weekend duffers can find it. This new golf ball, made by the dominant ball manufacturer in the sport, Titleist, is suddenly all the rage among the sport's professionals and America's 26 million weekend amateurs.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy, Larry Margison used to sneak into the Meadowlark Golf Course in Huntington Beach at dusk, wade into the shallow ponds and pick up golf balls with his toes. Often the superintendent shooed him away, but Margison always returned and became so proficient that the golf course finally gave him a deal: a quarter a ball. Now 41, Margison still retrieves wet golf balls. And he still gets about a quarter apiece for them.
SPORTS
May 15, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Last month at the Masters, Hootie Johnson, the Augusta National club chairman, slipped into his green jacket, sat behind a table and put on his best banker's face. Johnson got the ball rolling on a subject getting dangerously close to changing his demeanor, from coolly genteel to wholly agitated. Johnson said he hoped somebody would do something about golf balls, mainly because they're simply going too far.
SPORTS
May 25, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Lake Forest track prodigy Ashley Bethel have filed a $6.25-million claim against Saddleback College for damages relating to a Feb. 23 accident in which the 14-year-old lost her right eye. Bethel, a two-time national youth pentathlon champion and aspiring Olympian, was running on the Saddleback track when she was struck on the eye by a golf ball hit from the adjacent driving range.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Callaway Golf Co. sued Fortune Brands Inc.'s Acushnet Co. unit over a patent for polyurethane covers on golf balls. Acushnet's Pro V1 golf balls infringe a patent for the covers on multilayer solid-core golf balls that have become the standard for balls used by professional golfers, Carlsbad, Calif.-based Callaway said in a lawsuit filed in federal court in Delaware. The suit seeks damages for lost profit and sales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1987
Who bought tennis or golf balls or had a backache in the last year. Los Angeles, New York and Chicago compared to the nation. The national average is given a value of 100.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Callaway Golf Co., the maker of Big Bertha and Steelhead golf clubs, traded lawsuits with Fortune Brands Inc.'s Acushnet Co. over its redesigned Titleist Pro V1 golf balls. Acushnet's new versions of Pro V1 golf balls, modified after a previous infringement suit by Callaway, infringed two other patents, according to a complaint filed Monday in Wilmington, Del. Acushnet countersued, claiming Callaway's patents are invalid and that the Carlsbad, Calif., company infringed nine of its patents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997 | RUSS LOAR
The city is attempting to rein in high-flying golf balls that occasionally escape a Western Avenue driving range and bounce off neighboring homes. A new city ordinance would ban the use of regular golf balls at Stanton Golf Center, the city's only practice range, and require the use of "limited flight" balls. The use of regular golf balls is already prohibited by the driving range. "It's not permissible right now; it's just not a municipal code violation," City Manager Terry Matz said.
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