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Gonorrhea

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NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Doctors sometimes find gonorrhea bacteria in the human body.   Now medical researchers at Northwestern University have found human DNA in the gonorrhea genome. The discovery was detailed Sunday in the American Society for Microbiology's online journal, mBio .   Study co-author Mark Anderson told The Times the work was significant because it helps explain how pathogens (such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae , the bacteria this team studied) and hosts (such as people)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Syphilis cases in California jumped 18% from 2010 to 2011, according to new data released by the state Department of Public Health. The data also show a 5% rise in chlamydia cases and 1.5% increase in gonorrhea cases. Public health officials said they were concerned about the rise of all three sexually transmitted diseases because they can lead to even more serious health problems, like infertility and an increased risk of HIV. "The longer people have these infections without being treated the more likely it is they are going to develop a complication that will have both health and financial costs," said Heidi Bauer, chief of the Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Branch for the state public health agency.
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NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A new strain of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea should be enough to scare anyone who's playing the field without full protection. But the worries might not stop there. Like gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis are sexually transmitted diseases that are caused by bacteria. And anytime you have a bacterial disease, there's at least some chance that the germs could eventually find a way to outsmart antibiotics. So what are the odds that chlamydia or syphilis could turn into the next super germs?
NATIONAL
June 7, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A new "superbug" strain of gonorrhea, seemingly resistant to all known antibiotics, could be headed for the United States as the sexually transmitted disease continues its global march. There have been no known cases within the U.S. so far. But more countries, including Britain, Australia and France, are reporting instances of gonorrhea that are impervious to cephalosporin antibiotics -- the drugs normally used to snuff out the most serious cases. “We certainly are worried about importation of resistance,” Dr. Gail Bolan, director of the STD Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told The Times on Thursday.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A new "superbug" strain of gonorrhea, seemingly resistant to all known antibiotics, could be headed for the United States as the sexually transmitted disease continues its global march. There have been no known cases within the U.S. so far. But more countries, including Britain, Australia and France, are reporting instances of gonorrhea that are impervious to cephalosporin antibiotics -- the drugs normally used to snuff out the most serious cases. “We certainly are worried about importation of resistance,” Dr. Gail Bolan, director of the STD Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told The Times on Thursday.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Cases of gonorrhea that resist the last remaining antibiotic treatments for the the sexually transmitted disease have been detected in Australia, France, Japan, Norway, Sweden and Britain, officials at the World Health Organization said Wednesday. Sounding an alarm about the immense risks now posed by this once easily curable bug, the Geneva-based public health body announced a global action plan to control its spread and effect. The plan will focus on development of new treatments and on monitoring for incorrect use of antimicrobial agents - a practice that can promote the development of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae , the microbe that causes the disease.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | Associated Press
Gonorrhea climbed 9% in the United States in 1998 after 12 straight years of decline, the government reported Thursday. Debra Mosure, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speculated that the safe-sex practices that were adopted because of AIDS are being abandoned because of the introduction of more effective drugs against the virus. "There does seem to be some real increases in the overall number of gonorrhea cases due to unsafe sexual behavior," she said.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Japanese and European researchers have identified a new strain of Neisseria gonorroeae that is exceptionally resistant to cephalosporins, the last remaining family of antibiotics available to treat the sexually transmitted disease. Although physicians have identified only a handful of infections by the new strain of gonorrhea, called H041, they fear that its ability to grow even in the presence of the cephalosporins may allow it to spread rapidly throughout the world. "This is a large public health problem and the era of untreatable gonorrhea may now have been initiated," the team wrote in their abstract for the report presented Sunday at a Quebec City meeting of the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Bacteria that cause gonorrhea are quickly developing resistance to another antibiotic, and the world may be running out of drugs to cure this common venereal disease, Army doctors said. Their dire warning was based on recent findings that 8% of servicemen infected with gonorrhea in South Korea had strains of the germ that could withstand spectinomycin, a relatively new drug against the venereal disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California doctors should stop prescribing a widely used, inexpensive class of antibiotics to treat gonorrhea because a growing number of infections have grown resistant to the drugs, known as fluoroquinolones, federal health officials said Thursday. The antibiotic family includes Cipro, which gained fame last fall for treatment of inhalation anthrax.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Cases of gonorrhea that resist the last remaining antibiotic treatments for the the sexually transmitted disease have been detected in Australia, France, Japan, Norway, Sweden and Britain, officials at the World Health Organization said Wednesday. Sounding an alarm about the immense risks now posed by this once easily curable bug, the Geneva-based public health body announced a global action plan to control its spread and effect. The plan will focus on development of new treatments and on monitoring for incorrect use of antimicrobial agents - a practice that can promote the development of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae , the microbe that causes the disease.
OPINION
February 16, 2012
On the growing roster of antibiotic-resistant diseases, gonorrhea is the one that has most recently captured the attention of public health officials. Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned last week that 1.7% of certain types of gonorrhea infections show little response to treatment , even with cephalosporins, the last line of antibiotic defense. That might not sound like a lot, but with 600,000 Americans diagnosed annually, resistant cases number about 10,000 a year, and that number has been rising fast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Moving to combat rising rates of gonorrhea and chlamydia among young black women in South Los Angeles, county officials launched a new education and testing campaign Monday with some unlikely partners: churches. Pastors and "first ladies" from churches throughout the region are joining an effort to raise awareness of the sexually transmitted diseases and publicize a home testing program. "Nobody wants to talk about it," said Debra Williams, whose husband is the pastor at McCoy Memorial Baptist Church.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A new strain of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea should be enough to scare anyone who's playing the field without full protection. But the worries might not stop there. Like gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis are sexually transmitted diseases that are caused by bacteria. And anytime you have a bacterial disease, there's at least some chance that the germs could eventually find a way to outsmart antibiotics. So what are the odds that chlamydia or syphilis could turn into the next super germs?
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Japanese and European researchers have identified a new strain of Neisseria gonorroeae that is exceptionally resistant to cephalosporins, the last remaining family of antibiotics available to treat the sexually transmitted disease. Although physicians have identified only a handful of infections by the new strain of gonorrhea, called H041, they fear that its ability to grow even in the presence of the cephalosporins may allow it to spread rapidly throughout the world. "This is a large public health problem and the era of untreatable gonorrhea may now have been initiated," the team wrote in their abstract for the report presented Sunday at a Quebec City meeting of the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Doctors sometimes find gonorrhea bacteria in the human body.   Now medical researchers at Northwestern University have found human DNA in the gonorrhea genome. The discovery was detailed Sunday in the American Society for Microbiology's online journal, mBio .   Study co-author Mark Anderson told The Times the work was significant because it helps explain how pathogens (such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae , the bacteria this team studied) and hosts (such as people)
OPINION
February 16, 2012
On the growing roster of antibiotic-resistant diseases, gonorrhea is the one that has most recently captured the attention of public health officials. Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned last week that 1.7% of certain types of gonorrhea infections show little response to treatment , even with cephalosporins, the last line of antibiotic defense. That might not sound like a lot, but with 600,000 Americans diagnosed annually, resistant cases number about 10,000 a year, and that number has been rising fast.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Gonorrhea cases are rising at an alarming pace across the western United States, even while declining in the rest of the country, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. The number of cases in California and seven other western states increased 42% from 2000 to 2005 while declining 10% nationally, according to the report. An increase in gonorrhea is typically associated with a rise in other sexually transmitted diseases -- most importantly HIV infection.
NEWS
November 22, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The rate of gonorrhea in the United States is at an all-time low, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday, but the rates for chlamydia and syphilis continue to rise.  The three sexually transmitted diseases, orSTDs, together account for about 1.5 million cases annually, less than 10% of the country's estimated 19 million cases. But they are the only ones that must be reported to CDC by doctors because they have such potentially serious consequences. Herpes and human papillomavirus account for the bulk of the remaining STD infections.
SCIENCE
January 14, 2009 | Mary Engel
Rates of the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia are climbing in the U.S., and rates of syphilis -- once on the verge of elimination -- rose for the seventh consecutive year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday in its annual report on STDs. Gonorrhea rates did not increase, but they ceased falling a few years ago, frustrating goals set by public health leaders. Chlamydia infections in the United States now top 1.
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