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Gonorrhea

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Syphilis cases in California jumped 18% from 2010 to 2011, according to new data released by the state Department of Public Health. The data also show a 5% rise in chlamydia cases and 1.5% increase in gonorrhea cases. Public health officials said they were concerned about the rise of all three sexually transmitted diseases because they can lead to even more serious health problems, like infertility and an increased risk of HIV. "The longer people have these infections without being treated the more likely it is they are going to develop a complication that will have both health and financial costs," said Heidi Bauer, chief of the Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Branch for the state public health agency.
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NEWS
December 6, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
U.S. syphilis rates reached an all-time low in 1999, suggesting that it may be possible to virtually eliminate the disease from the American scene, but gonorrhea rates reversed a two-decade trend by rising 9%, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The syphilis decline was the result of natural cycles of the disease and an aggressive federal program of testing and education.
SCIENCE
November 14, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
The number of newly diagnosed cases of the three most common sexually transmitted diseases rose for the second year in a row in the U.S., driven in part by an increase in risky sexual behavior, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday. "Increases in all three of these STDs. . . underscore the need for vigilance," said Dr. John M. Douglas Jr., director of the CDC's division of STD prevention, which produced the report.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the price of beer goes up, teenage gonorrhea goes down, federal health officials say. Data released Thursday by the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that a tax increase of 20 cents per six-pack nationwide could reduce gonorrhea rates in young people by almost 9%. Why?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2002 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's annual report on the state of children offers a mixed picture: One in three children lives in poverty, but juvenile arrests and teen pregnancies are down. "If I had to give the condition of children in Orange County a letter grade, I would give them a C grade," said Douglas C. Barton, the county's behavioral health director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Moving to combat rising rates of gonorrhea and chlamydia among young black women in South Los Angeles, county officials launched a new education and testing campaign Monday with some unlikely partners: churches. Pastors and "first ladies" from churches throughout the region are joining an effort to raise awareness of the sexually transmitted diseases and publicize a home testing program. "Nobody wants to talk about it," said Debra Williams, whose husband is the pastor at McCoy Memorial Baptist Church.
SCIENCE
January 14, 2009 | Mary Engel
Rates of the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia are climbing in the U.S., and rates of syphilis -- once on the verge of elimination -- rose for the seventh consecutive year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday in its annual report on STDs. Gonorrhea rates did not increase, but they ceased falling a few years ago, frustrating goals set by public health leaders. Chlamydia infections in the United States now top 1.
HEALTH
April 13, 1998
There are more than 25 diseases that are transmitted sexually. Many have serious and costly consequences. Some of the most common and serious STDs include: Chlamydia * Used to Be Called: Non-gonoccocal urethritis. * Cause: Bacteria. * Number Affected: About 4 million new cases each year in the United States. * Infection Rate: Highest among 15- to 19-year-olds, followed by 20- to 24-year-olds. * At Risk: Everyone, but female teens are more likely to be infected because of immature cervix.
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