Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGonzalo Rodriguez Gacha
IN THE NEWS

Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the first international crackdown of its kind, authorities in five countries have frozen bank accounts holding at least $60 million belonging to one of the most-wanted members of a major Colombian cocaine cartel, a U.S. official disclosed Tuesday. Sources said the accounts were controlled by Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, a leading member of the Medellin cartel and one of the "dirty dozen" traffickers whose apprehension has been given top priority by U.S. authorities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Saturday hailed the death of a notorious drug trafficker in a half-hour gun battle in Colombia, saying he was "delighted" that Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha had been "brought to bay." With French President Francois Mitterrand at his side after the two met on this sun-swept French Caribbean island, Bush said at a news conference that the police action that ended in Rodriguez Gacha's death was "a very courageous effort on the part of the Colombians."
Advertisement
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Medellin cocaine cartel leader Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, one of the United States' most-wanted drug traffickers, was killed in a gun battle with police Friday, officials said. Rodriguez Gacha; his 17-year-old son, Freddy; and five bodyguards were wiped out in a gun battle 360 miles north of Bogota on a ranch owned by Pablo Escobar, godfather of Colombia's multibillion-dollar drug empire, national police chief Miguel Gomez Padilla said at a news conference. Rodriguez Gacha was the No.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the afterglow of the most successful battle yet in their war on narcotics traffickers, Colombia's top police officers called the bloody death of drug lord Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha "a splendid Christmas present," and editorial writers crowed Saturday that it broke "the myth of invulnerability of the barons."
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Saturday hailed the death of a notorious drug trafficker in a half-hour gun battle in Colombia, saying he was "delighted" that Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha had been "brought to bay." With French President Francois Mitterrand at his side after the two met on this sun-swept French Caribbean island, Bush said at a news conference that the police action that ended in Rodriguez Gacha's death was "a very courageous effort on the part of the Colombians."
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the afterglow of the most successful battle yet in their war on narcotics traffickers, Colombia's top police officers called the bloody death of drug lord Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha "a splendid Christmas present," and editorial writers crowed Saturday that it broke "the myth of invulnerability of the barons."
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Police fatally shot the chief of the Medellin cocaine cartel's terrorist squads Wednesday, crushing one of the last, most formidable shields protecting Pablo Escobar, the drug ring's fugitive leader. Brance Munoz Mosquera--who was 33 and was nicknamed Tyson because of his resemblance to American boxer Mike Tyson--was Escobar's closest associate still at large.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | Reuters
Seven convicts were killed and two guards wounded during a prison uprising, officials said Tuesday. The officials said in a communique that the mutiny began late Monday when inmates at the La Picota prison took 17 people hostage--12 prison guards and three wives and two children of prisoners visiting the jail. The rebellious prisoners were angered by the death of drug lord Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, killed by police on Dec. 15, the communique said.
NEWS
September 27, 1989
Citing a lack of evidence, a Colombian judge dropped charges against two reputed leaders of the Medellin drug cartel accused in the assassination of Colombia's attorney general and a kidnaping, a leading Bogota newspaper reported. The two--Pablo Escobar and Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha--are being sought by U.S. authorities. The judge's action in Colombia apparently would not prevent their extradition.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian President Virgilio Barco cut short his official visit to Japan and headed home, where a spate of bombings has plagued his nation. Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, commander of the investigative police, said that Pablo Escobar and Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, two chiefs of the Medellin cocaine cartel, were responsible for a blast that shattered a block of buildings in downtown Bogota on Wednesday. Drug lords also were blamed for a bomb that downed a Colombian jetliner Nov. 27.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Medellin cocaine cartel leader Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, one of the United States' most-wanted drug traffickers, was killed in a gun battle with police Friday, officials said. Rodriguez Gacha; his 17-year-old son, Freddy; and five bodyguards were wiped out in a gun battle 360 miles north of Bogota on a ranch owned by Pablo Escobar, godfather of Colombia's multibillion-dollar drug empire, national police chief Miguel Gomez Padilla said at a news conference. Rodriguez Gacha was the No.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the first international crackdown of its kind, authorities in five countries have frozen bank accounts holding at least $60 million belonging to one of the most-wanted members of a major Colombian cocaine cartel, a U.S. official disclosed Tuesday. Sources said the accounts were controlled by Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, a leading member of the Medellin cartel and one of the "dirty dozen" traffickers whose apprehension has been given top priority by U.S. authorities.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. agents watched as Medellin cartel leader Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha laundered hundreds of millions of dollars in cocaine profits through Panama's notorious First Inter-Americas Bank, a drug agent testified in the Miami trial of Manuel A. Noriega. Thomas Telles, stationed in Panama for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in 1984 through 1986, was subpoenaed to testify for the defense.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The personal pilot of a top Colombian cocaine kingpin has been arrested and is being held for extradition to the United States, police in Bogota said. The pilot, Jorge de la Cuesta Marquez, is wanted in Florida on drug charges. He was identified as the pilot for Pablo Escobar, leader of the Medellin cocaine cartel. Meanwhile, nephews of two other Colombian drug traffickers were reported captured in Mexico City, where authorities broke up a ring that flew cocaine to Mexico on its way to Florida.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|