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OPINION
May 17, 2009
Re "Cost-cutting ideas die in Legislature," May 2 The degree to which many in Sacramento are so out of touch with reality is truly startling. At my company, we've laid off 15% of the workforce, reduced salaries and cut benefits. Yet selling the L.A. Memorial Coliseum strikes Sen. Roderick Wright (D-Inglewood) as "goofy." I assure you, Sen. Wright, not to me and many others who are suffering under the weight of legislators' mismanagement of our state's finances over the years. Jerry Dworkin Irvine
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Mike Kupper, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ralph Kiner, who spent 10 seasons hitting towering home runs in the major leagues, then spent most of the rest of his life joyfully calling baseball games on radio and TV, died Thursday at his home in Rancho Mirage, Calif. He was 91. The Baseball Hall of Fame announced his death, citing natural causes. An outfielder, Kiner played for three clubs - he was a shining star for the otherwise dreary Pittsburgh Pirates in the late 1940s and early '50s - but New York fans knew him as the funny guy who broadcast Mets games for more than 40 years, mixing up the players' names and goofing up the language.
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OPINION
March 7, 1993
Orange County: the Mighty Ducks, John Wayne Airport, B-1 Bob. Yeah, we do look kinda goofy. MIKE KAPOWICH, Corona del Mar
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2013 | By August Brown
Donald Glover's newest album as Childish Gambino, "Because the Internet," is a self-aware portrait of a young man isolated by technology, celebrity and relentless introspection. Anyone who caught Glover's recent bloodletting Instagram session (in which he listed a barrage of self-criticisms on hotel stationery) might think that unplugging from the Web would give his brain a much-deserved break. But then he'd have lost his source material for this sometimes goofy, often sad, very capable laptop-rap album.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1993
What's in a name? The Mighty Ducks? It's just goofy enough to work! HARRIET OTTAVIANO Seal Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993
(Gov.) Pete Wilson "christens" a toll road and pledges $60 million for off-ramps to Disneyland?! Is it goofy, or is it me? MIKE KAPOWICH Corona del Mar
NEWS
July 7, 1985
"Including too much in a shot can reduce its impact" (Index page, June 2). True! So how in the world could you choose Barbara Moffet's goofy picture? Some of the (other) photographs were fantastic. Mary Zambrano Santa Paula
NEWS
March 29, 1992
Thanks to KNBC and KTLA for bringing "Today in L.A." and "Morning News," respectively, into our chaotic and depressing mornings. As a veteran morning news viewer, I find that Kent Shocknek's goofy wit and Carla Aragon's smart comebacks keep me happily informed. And, the entire cast of "Morning News" is a riot. Kimberly A. Smith, Northridge
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992
Courageously, the editors let a guy named Bob Baker sing the lament of the California-born ("Us Against Them," Guest Bites Town, April 12). We natives best understand the ethnic diversity that has long been at the area's core. It is we who have a sense of the place: Pico Rivera with fascinating horned lizards, predating the condos. The misty, mystic shoals adjacent to Ballona Creek, there long before the unflattering gold chains of Marina del Rey. The extranjeros who came here to see Goofy or be goofy.
MAGAZINE
May 21, 2006
What an outstanding article by Abby Sher ("Even in This Town, You Can Be Too Thin," The Rules of Hollywood, April 30). It brought tears to my eyes. I hope she reaches a lot of young women with this one. Mary Curtius Carlsbad Cause. Effect. Blame. Um . . . logic? What the heck was the point of this Hollywood-bashing tale? Best wishes to Ms. Sher for success with her recovery. And a request to West for less goofy first-person pieces. Jane Wald Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Robert Abele
A spirited, empathetic attempt to turn a legacy of educational shame into a call for understanding and action, Harvey Hubbell V's documentary, "Dislecksia: The Movie," has a necessary charge to it, but also a distractingly goofy side. If you only think of dyslexia as the "rearranging letters" condition - like some quirky trait - Hubbell, himself dyslexic, is quick to communicate how debilitating a reading disability can be to a child who isn't progressing at the rate of his or her peers and who isn't given the tools to manage it. "They gave me a diploma," Hubbell says at one point about his own fraught experiences growing up, "but they didn't give me the skills to fill out a job application.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Kate Mather
The nurse who gave Michael Jackson anesthesia during medical procedures spanning a decade testified Thursday that he pulled the plug on one because of the star's "inappropriate" behavior. David Fournier, a certified nurse anesthetist who first worked with Jackson in 1993, said the singer was scheduled to receive some "facial work" in 2003 when Fournier canceled the procedure. Everything was ready to go, he said, when Jackson arrived acting "a little goofy, a little slow to respond.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Midway through the fourth season of "Justified," an out-of-town hoodlum tells Kentucky drug kingpin Boyd Crowder, "I love how you talk, using 40 words where four will do. " The thug makes a point. Boyd, played by Walton Goggins, may well be the most loquacious psychopath in prime time. Set in rural Kentucky, FX's series includes enough gunplay to satisfy crime-genre fans, but it's the killer dialogue that steals this show. "Justified" cast members have made the most of it with performances that have so far reaped five Emmy acting nominations and two wins.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Christopher Guest, the director of "Best in Show" and "A Mighty Wind," has made a TV series for HBO. The eight-episode "Family Tree," which premieres Sunday, is his first work in seven years, and like his films it is sweet and funny and not a little melancholy. Guest gives the world a quarter-twist toward the ridiculous, without losing sight of the human dreams and strivings, obsessions and accommodations that are his main and constant subject. The new series, which opens in England before moving in its second half to America, stars Chris O'Dowd, an Irish comic actor who has been insinuating himself little by little into the American consciousness; he was in "Bridesmaids" and "This Is 40" and had a recurring role in the first season of "Girls," and many will know him as the star of the British sitcom "The IT Crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Among the household items put to unintended use in the new film "Evil Dead," a playfully reverent if not-overly-so remake of Sam Raimi's 1981 cult favorite horror movie, are a nail gun, an electric knife, a jerry-rigged defibrillator, and, in an obvious nod to the original, a chain saw. The feature debut of Uruguayan director Fede Alvarez, discovered via a short on YouTube, "Evil Dead" has a gleeful exuberance of its own analogous to the mad invention...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By August Brown
Thurston Moore's new band Chelsea Light Moving is named after the avant-garde composer Philip Glass' pre-fame moving company, and that's a pretty good metaphor for the band's sound: high-minded musicians doing some dumb, brawny lifting. The band's self-titled debut comes after a gentler acoustic solo album and what appears to be a long hiatus for Sonic Youth (Moore is separating from his wife and band co-founder Kim Gordon). So it makes sense that his next move is this low-stakes, punky project whose album sounds like it was written in an afternoon - in both good and bad ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008
When you take your kids to the Museum of Jurassic Technology -- or, as Nipper dubbed it, "The Weird Museum" -- bring along their bathroom step-stool if they're under 4 1/2 feet tall. Much of the coolest stuff is in display cases too high for them to see properly and, believe me, they'll want to gape at curator David Wilson's oddities -- such as a horn removed from a human's forehead and "micromosaics" made from butterfly wing scales -- far longer than you'll want to hold them up. To adults, this museum is loaded with brain-scratching exhibits like "Tell the Bees: Belief, Knowledge & Hypersymbolic Cognition."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995
In your Feb. 27 article on the problems with Walt Disney Concert Hall the only adjective used to describe the Frank O. Gehry design is "complex." Is this a euphemism for all the controversy and criticism regarding his design or did you not want to get into that? Perhaps, in the interest of aesthetics, it's best this goofy structure not be built at all. Let's cut our losses and settle for the "Disney garage." RICHARD R. McCURDY Hollywood I'm not surprised that the contractors have been having trouble with the plans to build Disney Concert Hall (March 4)
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
The stage was filled with flowers and gold. The audience was filled with short skirts and diamonds. Davis Gaines elegantly sang "Music of the Night," while, on the screen behind him, there appeared a photo of Jerry and Jimmy Buss crooning karaoke. Several members of the USC marching band played "Amazing Grace," but they did so while wearing their sunglasses. The first song was from "Toy Story," the last song was from Sinatra, and in between, the stage flashed photos of Jerry Buss hanging out with his grandchildren, his buddy Hugh Hefner, and his poker chips.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In "Wendell and Vinnie," a new sitcom premiering Saturday on Nick at Nite before taking up its regular Sunday time slot, Jerry Trainor (as Vinnie) becomes the guardian of his orphaned 12-year-old nephew - that would be Wendell. Their names define them: Vinnie, loose and goofy; Wendell, tight and brainy. The meeting of the juvenile adult and the adult juvenile, of the child who plays father to the man who teaches him to be a child, is not new in the history of storytelling. Nor is the tale in which a happy-go-lucky single person is suddenly taxed with and enriched by the care of an inherited youngster.
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