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BUSINESS
September 28, 2009 | David Sarno
As Google and Microsoft battle for dominance in technology, a skirmish in Los Angeles City Hall is offering a rare public glimpse into a rivalry that could help determine the fortunes of both companies -- and, quite possibly, how workers in the future will communicate. The two tech giants are clashing over a $7.25-million contract to replace L.A.'s outdated e-mail system. The stakes are high enough that both companies have fielded teams of lobbyists and executives to press their case in City Hall.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Google Inc. will begin selling corporate America an online suite of software that includes e-mail, word processing, spreadsheets and calendar management, escalating the Internet search leader's invasion of technological turf traditionally dominated by Microsoft Corp. and IBM Corp.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google Inc. is under fire from a coalition of companies including Microsoft Corp. which have called on European antitrust authorities to launch an investigation into the Internet giant's dominance on smartphones. The FairSearch group alleges Google is violating European antitrust laws by giving away its Android mobile operating system to device manufacturers on the condition that its applications such as Google Maps and YouTube be prominently displayed on devices. Android mobile software is installed on about 70% of new smartphones, making it the dominant mobile software platform around the world.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Google Search for iPhone has gotten a complete overhaul that makes the app much cleaner, speedier and a bit user-friendlier, if you will. The updated app, complete with the day's Google Doodle, now automatically fills the screen in both portrait and landscape orientations with search results. You scroll down, and the controls are hidden. You scroll up to reveal them again. Across the bottom of the screen, you find the categories of search areas including images, videos, news and blogs.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s big push to supply email services to governments around the country is running into headwinds both from federal agencies and its marquee client, Los Angeles City Hall. More than a year after the city awarded Google a $7.2-million contract to provide email for its 30,000 employees, Google has been unable to meet crucial security requirements, preventing nearly half of city personnel from moving to the new system, according to city officials. The city's controller has launched an inquiry, and City Council members have held closed-door meetings to confer with attorneys, raising the possibility of legal action.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2009 | David Sarno
Google Inc.'s Gmail electronic mail platform went offline Tuesday for more than an hour, prompting an outcry from tens of thousands of users and reminding consumers that the Mountain View, Calif., company is not immune from widespread outages. "Gmail is down & everyones having panic attacks," wrote Anna B., a Twitter user in Los Angeles. "Including myself." Later in the day, Google said it fixed the problem and was investigating the cause. Gmail is the third-most-visited e-mail service, with nearly 37 million unique visitors, according to ComScore Inc. Many of Google's services exist in what is known as the cloud, a style of computing that allows users to run Google programs through the Web rather than from their hard drives.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google is known for being a bit of a prankster when it comes to April Fools' Day, and the Silicon Valley giant this year once again lived up to its reputation. From an all-blue Gmail to the new "Google Nose" search service that can create artificial scents for users, the company went all out -- but it wasn't the only tech company to release April Fools' Day jokes. Twitter said it was launching a new all-consonant service, and Sony put out a line of tech products for pets. PHOTOS: Top 10 must-have smartphone apps Here are some of this year's best April Fools' Day pranks by tech companies.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2009 | David Sarno
To Google or not to Google? That's the $7.25-million question the Los Angeles City Council is expected to answer today as it ponders handing over control of its massive e-mail system to Google Inc. Beyond questions of whether the city would save money, the decision is likely to influence other cities and businesses considering whether to stay with older e-mail programs, such as Microsoft Corp.'s Outlook, or to jump into the future of cloud computing. Nearly six months after city technology officials selected Google's proposal to replace the city's e-mail system (which is from neither Microsoft nor Google)
BUSINESS
June 29, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Can Google Inc. make friends? The Internet search giant, whose goal is to organize information, will try to organize people with a social networking service designed to rival the growing influence of Facebook Inc. Google+ is the company's most ambitious effort yet to keep Web users and advertising dollars from straying to social networking sites. The project, which Google has been quietly working on for months, has been championed by Google co-founder Larry Page, who, even before taking over as chief executive in April, made social networking a priority.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc., pushing to expand its e-mail and cloud computing business, took the federal government to court to change a bidding process that it said stacks the deck in favor of rival Microsoft Corp. Google, which has been battling Microsoft across the country to gain a foothold in the $20-billion office software market, sued the U.S. Department of the Interior for allegedly excluding Google's bid to provide its e-mail system for the agency's 88,000 employees. According to the lawsuit, the department specified that it would consider only systems that used Microsoft's business e-mail software, a limitation Google called "unduly restrictive of competition.
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