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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Utah's Great Salt Lake covers some 1,700 square miles, making it one of the largest such bodies of salt water around. Have you ever wondered exactly where, relative to other parts of that vast and peculiar lake, artist Robert Smithson built his landmark environmental sculpture "The Spiral Jetty" in 1970? With just a few clicks of your mouse, Google Earth would be happy to show you, thanks to a newly launched project in conjunction with a sprawling exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Little Tokyo warehouse space.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | Meghan Daum
Rush Limbaugh is right on this one. The reporting on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, has turned into a spectacle - not the good kind. It's all "such a show," Limbaugh told his listeners Monday. "We've got anchors and anchorettes who don't know beans about even why an airplane flies. They couldn't explain the concept of air pressure differential or lift to you if their jobs depended on it. " Actually it's even worse than "such a show": The lack of any real information has pushed television news to new levels of unintentional self-parody.
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SCIENCE
November 27, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
All it took to reach a more realistic estimate of how much fish is being harvested from the sea was one scientist with an Internet connection and an inquisitive mind. Researchers at the University of British Columbia used satellite imagery from Google Earth to discover that large fish traps in the Persian Gulf could be netting nearly six times more fish than official statistics report. The study began with a PhD student messing around on the Internet. ”I was just playing around with Google Earth, doing what most people do when they first get on, which is try to find their house,” said Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak, a doctoral student at the university's Fisheries Center and lead author of the study.
SCIENCE
January 3, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Dogs can typically smell and hear far better than their human companions. Now it appears they can sense Earth's magnetic field too, say a team of biologists - and they show it when they poop. These canine compasses prefer to align themselves along a north-south magnetic axis when they relieve themselves, according to a study in the journal Frontiers in Zoology. The findings may help scientists better understand how that strange sense called magnetoreception manifests in mammals. Dogs wouldn't be the only animals thought to use magnetoreception: Birds do it, bees do it - and certain types of mammals do it, according to study coauthor Sabine Begall, a biologist at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Here's one excuse to goof off on the Web while at work: A Mississippi man found a stolen SUV while browsing photos of his land on Google Earth. A spokeswoman for the George County sheriff in southern Mississippi laid out the odd tale in a phone interview with the Los Angeles Times. "On Monday morning, a local resident came in and said, 'You know, this weekend I was at work, working the night shift, and I decided to check out my hunting land,'" spokeswoman Shonna Pierce said Thursday.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2009 | Mark Silva
Dick Cheney may not have lived in an undisclosed location while he was vice president, but it was all but impossible to see it on Google Earth. Once obscured by pixilation, Google Earth's aerial image of the vice presidential residence on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington is now nearly as clear as its view of the White House.
OPINION
August 29, 2006 | Sonni Efron, SONNI EFRON is an Op-Ed Page editor.
I AM SOARING over North Korea, looking down on a denuded landscape and zooming in to hover over missile batteries, nuclear sites, huge palaces and prison camps. It's a cyber tour, courtesy of Google Earth. I once visited North Korea as a reporter, yet this virtual view is far more revealing than anything I was permitted to see. Has the Hermit Kingdom finally met its match?
TRAVEL
November 5, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
I discovered an incredible new travel tool while I was having a tooth crowned recently. My L.A. dentist and I were waiting for my gums to numb when he turned on his computer and asked, "Have you seen this?" He clicked on an icon and up came Google Earth, which gives you a list of sites to visit for information on a topic and also displays almost any location on the planet in 3-D. Google Earth accesses maps, satellite imagery and aerial photography taken in the last three years.
TRAVEL
April 7, 2013 | By Tim Shisler, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Planning, traveling and sharing a vacation with apps that have geography at their heart is no longer just a futuristic idea. Dated guidebooks, tattered maps and finding a place to eat may have been part of the travel headache in times past, but new technology and mobile applications have eliminated many of those hurdles. Here are three of my favorite online and mobile applications to help you plan, enjoy and share your vacation without getting lost or guessing whether the hotel you hope to stay in is close to the ocean.
NEWS
June 28, 2009 | Jay Alabaster, Alabaster writes for the Associated Press.
When Google Earth added historical maps of Japan to its online collection last year, the search giant didn't expect a backlash. The finely detailed woodblock prints have been around for centuries, they were already posted on another website, and a historical map of Tokyo put up in 2006 hadn't caused any problems. But Google failed to judge how its offering would be received, as it has often done in Japan. The company is now facing inquiries from the Justice Ministry and angry accusations of prejudice because its maps detailed the locations of former low-caste communities.
SCIENCE
November 27, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
All it took to reach a more realistic estimate of how much fish is being harvested from the sea was one scientist with an Internet connection and an inquisitive mind. Researchers at the University of British Columbia used satellite imagery from Google Earth to discover that large fish traps in the Persian Gulf could be netting nearly six times more fish than official statistics report. The study began with a PhD student messing around on the Internet. ”I was just playing around with Google Earth, doing what most people do when they first get on, which is try to find their house,” said Dalal Al-Abdulrazzak, a doctoral student at the university's Fisheries Center and lead author of the study.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Here's one excuse to goof off on the Web while at work: A Mississippi man found a stolen SUV while browsing photos of his land on Google Earth. A spokeswoman for the George County sheriff in southern Mississippi laid out the odd tale in a phone interview with the Los Angeles Times. "On Monday morning, a local resident came in and said, 'You know, this weekend I was at work, working the night shift, and I decided to check out my hunting land,'" spokeswoman Shonna Pierce said Thursday.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- He's the brains behind Google Earth, Maps and Street View. Now John Hanke is searching for new ways to connect people to the world around them. He runs Niantic Labs, essentially a tiny startup inside Google. Google Chief Executive Larry Page greenlighted Niantic's mission to re-imagine the physical world with augmented reality. So far it has produced two mobile apps. Field Trip is like a real-time guide book that digitally annotates the world. Your phone buzzes to deliver helpful information about your surroundings, pointing you to a cool new restaurant or a city landmark.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - This summer, tourists on the Tuscan island of Giglio have been heading for the pretty palm-lined beach at the port, soaking up the sun and swimming out to a line of buoys. Beyond is the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia, sitting in shallow water where passengers were sucked to their deaths by whirlpools created as the giant vessel lurched onto its side. Nineteen months after the 950-foot-long ship slammed into rocks off this Mediterranean island and came to a precarious rest on two granite outcrops, the captain, Francesco Schettino, is on trial on charges of manslaughter in the deaths of 32 people who never made it ashore on the night of Jan. 13, 2012.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Citizen scientists, environmentalists and anyone who lives near a power plant -- your services are requested. Climate change scientist Kevin Robert Gurney needs your help in a grand undertaking: the mapping of all the power plants in the world. It's a big job, and he and the people in his lab cannot do it alone. Gurney, an associate professor at Arizona State University, builds carbon dioxide emission data models that help him and others better understand how carbon moves around the planet and how it effects climate change.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Much has happened to the planet since 1984, and now Google has come up with a way to have a spectacular, bird's-eye view of the changes. In partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey, NASA and Time magazine, Google has put together a website that features high-quality satellite pictures of Earth for every year since 1984 for every part of the world. Users can locate any spot on the planet and then watch the tool cycle through images taken between 1984 and 2012. "Today, we're making it possible for you to go back in time and get a stunning historical perspective on the changes to the Earth's surface over time," Google said in a blog post .  PHOTOS: Google Street View images of the highest points on the planet The images were taken by Landsat satellites as part of a joint mission of NASA and the USGS.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2009 | Jessica Guynn and John Johnson Jr.
Google finally put the world's oceans on the map. During a splashy presentation Monday at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, the Internet giant unveiled a feature in its Google Earth program that will allow users to swim through undersea canyons as deep as the Mariana Trench and encounter creatures like a critically endangered, prehistoric fish called the coelacanth.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Perhaps more than any other person, Marissa Mayer influences how the world experiences the Web. As Google Inc.'s champion of innovation and design, she has had her hand in nearly every product the Internet search giant has rolled out. Basically, nothing gets out the door without her approval, including such popular services as Gmail and Google Earth. Her latest job at the company: vice president of consumer products. One of her responsibilities is to run Google's geographic and local services effort, the red-hot market focused on delivering information and advertising to people based on where they are. Mayer also recently got a promotion to Google's operating committee, the elite group that sets the company's strategic direction.
SCIENCE
May 6, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Ports like Los Angeles and Long Beach are key to the global economy: crossroads where billions of dollars in cargo arrive and depart each year , floating on board thousands of vessels from all over the world. Increasingly, however, large ports are also playing a key role in Earth's ecosystem, as species from all corners stow away on ships and make their way into ports -- sometimes, with devastating consequences for native wildlife.  For example, the Chinese mitten crab , which comes from the Pacific Coast of China and Korea, made its way to the U.S. West Coast on ships during the early 1990s and was first spotted in the Chesapeake Bay about 15 years later.  Fisherman catching shrimp have reported that the mitten crabs, which have patches of hair on their claws , get tangled in nets and can kill shrimp.  Because they burrow, invasive mitten crabs can also speed erosion in levees and banks.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has just added its 49th and 50th country to its popular Street View feature, enabling Web browsers to check out locations like the Hungarian Parliament building , the European country's Chain bridge or the largest medicinal bath in Europe, the Széchenyi thermal bath . Street View, available with Google Maps, gives users 360-degree views of millions of locations around the globe, now including those in Hungary and Lesotho....
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