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BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Associated Press' main Twitter account was taken over Tuesday by hackers who sent out a fake tweet saying two explosions had gone off at the White House, injuring President Obama. Within minutes, the real AP used other accounts at its disposal to tweet that the attack message was bogus and Twitter shut down the @AP account. "The (at)AP twitter account has been hacked," the news service warned. "A tweet about an attack at the White House is false. We will advise on acct. status," the news agency tweeted from its @APStylebook account.  PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 Twitter also suspended the news agency's @AP_Mobile account to prevent more false news from spreading.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Yahoo has named Marissa Mayer, a longtime Google executive, as its new CEO. The beleaguered search giant announced that it had appointed Mayer president, CEO and a board member effective Tuesday. She becomes the company's fifth chief executive in as many years. “The appointment of Ms. Mayer, a leading consumer Internet executive, signals a renewed focus on product innovation to drive user experience and advertising revenue,” Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Yahoo said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google's popular Street View map service has sparked privacy debates around the globe. But in Israel, government officials are worried that the service could endanger public figures by giving terrorists detailed information that could be used in carrying out attacks. Israel said Monday that it was weighing whether to allow Google to photograph Israeli cities to promote tourist sites despite risks to privacy and safety. Street View allows users to virtually tour locations in 27 countries.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - This summer, tourists on the Tuscan island of Giglio have been heading for the pretty palm-lined beach at the port, soaking up the sun and swimming out to a line of buoys. Beyond is the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia, sitting in shallow water where passengers were sucked to their deaths by whirlpools created as the giant vessel lurched onto its side. Nineteen months after the 950-foot-long ship slammed into rocks off this Mediterranean island and came to a precarious rest on two granite outcrops, the captain, Francesco Schettino, is on trial on charges of manslaughter in the deaths of 32 people who never made it ashore on the night of Jan. 13, 2012.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- He's the brains behind Google Earth, Maps and Street View. Now John Hanke is searching for new ways to connect people to the world around them. He runs Niantic Labs, essentially a tiny startup inside Google. Google Chief Executive Larry Page greenlighted Niantic's mission to re-imagine the physical world with augmented reality. So far it has produced two mobile apps. Field Trip is like a real-time guide book that digitally annotates the world. Your phone buzzes to deliver helpful information about your surroundings, pointing you to a cool new restaurant or a city landmark.
WORLD
January 29, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Google unveiled its new maps of North Korea on Monday, beginning to fill what was once a blank expanse on its digital maps with streets, subway stops and even the locations of infamous North Korean prison camps. The crowdsourced maps were created by volunteer “citizen cartographers” who share and check geographical information, using a system that allows anyone to add and update data, Google said Monday. They bring more information about the isolated country onto the widely used website, landing Kim Il Sung Square and Bukchang Gulag on the same platform routinely used to check driving directions in Los Angeles or peruse street views in Houston.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2008 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has changed the world. The way we learn, buy things, are entertained, view ourselves and everyone else -- all have been transformed by Google, which was incorporated in California 10 years ago Sunday. In the process, it has become one of the most powerful companies on the planet. It all began with Larry Page and Sergey Brin, two Stanford University graduate students who turned their research project into an Internet technology company. They bet that their search engine could run better than the rest and help, as they say, organize the world's information.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
At first glance, Google's latest plan for global domination sounds very cool. Everyone's favorite pedal-to-the-metal, innovate-or-die tech company is throwing its Mensa-level brainpower behind the development of a computer operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows. But that's why you want to be worried.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | Matthew Shaer, Shaer is a staff writer at the Christian Science Monitor.
Asked in 2002 to describe the "ultimate" search engine, Google co-founder Sergey Brin half-jokingly pointed to HAL 9000, the supercomputer from the Stanley Kubrick film "2001: A Space Odyssey." "HAL . . . had a lot of information, could piece it together, could rationalize it," Brin told a PBS reporter. "Now hopefully . . . it would never have a bug like HAL did where he killed the occupants of the spaceship. But that's what we're striving for, and I think we've made it a part of the way there."
OPINION
February 18, 2011
Will man survive? Re "Patt Morrison Asks: Saving Earth," Opinion, Feb. 12 Patt Morrison did a good Q&A with Paul R. Ehrlich. I still have my original copy of his 1968 book, "The Population Bomb. " However, the article has a misleading title. The crisis we are facing does not involve saving the Earth or even saving the environment. Both will survive with or without our intervention. Rather, the title should have been, "Saving humans. " No matter what we do, the Earth and its environment will go on, much in the way that the Earth survived when the dinosaurs did not. Perhaps we are only a placeholder ?
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