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BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Associated Press' main Twitter account was taken over Tuesday by hackers who sent out a fake tweet saying two explosions had gone off at the White House, injuring President Obama. Within minutes, the real AP used other accounts at its disposal to tweet that the attack message was bogus and Twitter shut down the @AP account. "The (at)AP twitter account has been hacked," the news service warned. "A tweet about an attack at the White House is false. We will advise on acct. status," the news agency tweeted from its @APStylebook account.  PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 Twitter also suspended the news agency's @AP_Mobile account to prevent more false news from spreading.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google's popular Street View map service has sparked privacy debates around the globe. But in Israel, government officials are worried that the service could endanger public figures by giving terrorists detailed information that could be used in carrying out attacks. Israel said Monday that it was weighing whether to allow Google to photograph Israeli cities to promote tourist sites despite risks to privacy and safety. Street View allows users to virtually tour locations in 27 countries.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Welcome to the mobile mapping wars. It's the latest escalation in the heated competition between Apple and Google. The Internet search giant Wednesday showed off new features of its digital maps ahead of Apple's annual developer conference next week, but dodged questions about whether it's about to get the steel-tipped boot from Apple's iPhone and iPad. Google billed the event as "the next dimension" for its digital mapping service. The aim is to get even more people to use its maps even as Apple reportedly prepares to jettison Google as a built-in application in its mobile operating system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
The methods allegedly used by a group of teenagers suspected by authorities of burglarizing the homes of such stars as Lindsay Lohan, Orlando Bloom and Paris Hilton have again raised concerns about the intrusive glare of the paparazzi. According to detectives, the group used celebrity websites and paparazzi photos to track schedules and movements of the people they are suspected of burglarizing. They looked for times when the stars were scheduled to either be out of town or attending movie premieres and other events, police said.
WORLD
January 29, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Google unveiled its new maps of North Korea on Monday, beginning to fill what was once a blank expanse on its digital maps with streets, subway stops and even the locations of infamous North Korean prison camps. The crowdsourced maps were created by volunteer “citizen cartographers” who share and check geographical information, using a system that allows anyone to add and update data, Google said Monday. They bring more information about the isolated country onto the widely used website, landing Kim Il Sung Square and Bukchang Gulag on the same platform routinely used to check driving directions in Los Angeles or peruse street views in Houston.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2008 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has changed the world. The way we learn, buy things, are entertained, view ourselves and everyone else -- all have been transformed by Google, which was incorporated in California 10 years ago Sunday. In the process, it has become one of the most powerful companies on the planet. It all began with Larry Page and Sergey Brin, two Stanford University graduate students who turned their research project into an Internet technology company. They bet that their search engine could run better than the rest and help, as they say, organize the world's information.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
At first glance, Google's latest plan for global domination sounds very cool. Everyone's favorite pedal-to-the-metal, innovate-or-die tech company is throwing its Mensa-level brainpower behind the development of a computer operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows. But that's why you want to be worried.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | Matthew Shaer, Shaer is a staff writer at the Christian Science Monitor.
Asked in 2002 to describe the "ultimate" search engine, Google co-founder Sergey Brin half-jokingly pointed to HAL 9000, the supercomputer from the Stanley Kubrick film "2001: A Space Odyssey." "HAL . . . had a lot of information, could piece it together, could rationalize it," Brin told a PBS reporter. "Now hopefully . . . it would never have a bug like HAL did where he killed the occupants of the spaceship. But that's what we're striving for, and I think we've made it a part of the way there."
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- He's the brains behind Google Earth, Maps and Street View. Now John Hanke is searching for new ways to connect people to the world around them. He runs Niantic Labs, essentially a tiny startup inside Google. Google Chief Executive Larry Page greenlighted Niantic's mission to re-imagine the physical world with augmented reality. So far it has produced two mobile apps. Field Trip is like a real-time guide book that digitally annotates the world. Your phone buzzes to deliver helpful information about your surroundings, pointing you to a cool new restaurant or a city landmark.
OPINION
February 18, 2011
Will man survive? Re "Patt Morrison Asks: Saving Earth," Opinion, Feb. 12 Patt Morrison did a good Q&A with Paul R. Ehrlich. I still have my original copy of his 1968 book, "The Population Bomb. " However, the article has a misleading title. The crisis we are facing does not involve saving the Earth or even saving the environment. Both will survive with or without our intervention. Rather, the title should have been, "Saving humans. " No matter what we do, the Earth and its environment will go on, much in the way that the Earth survived when the dinosaurs did not. Perhaps we are only a placeholder ?
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