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June 6, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Welcome to the mobile mapping wars. It's the latest escalation in the heated competition between Apple and Google. The Internet search giant Wednesday showed off new features of its digital maps ahead of Apple's annual developer conference next week, but dodged questions about whether it's about to get the steel-tipped boot from Apple's iPhone and iPad. Google billed the event as "the next dimension" for its digital mapping service. The aim is to get even more people to use its maps even as Apple reportedly prepares to jettison Google as a built-in application in its mobile operating system.
January 29, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Google unveiled its new maps of North Korea on Monday, beginning to fill what was once a blank expanse on its digital maps with streets, subway stops and even the locations of infamous North Korean prison camps. The crowdsourced maps were created by volunteer “citizen cartographers” who share and check geographical information, using a system that allows anyone to add and update data, Google said Monday. They bring more information about the isolated country onto the widely used website, landing Kim Il Sung Square and Bukchang Gulag on the same platform routinely used to check driving directions in Los Angeles or peruse street views in Houston.
January 3, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Dogs can typically smell and hear far better than their human companions. Now it appears they can sense Earth's magnetic field too, say a team of biologists - and they show it when they poop. These canine compasses prefer to align themselves along a north-south magnetic axis when they relieve themselves, according to a study in the journal Frontiers in Zoology. The findings may help scientists better understand how that strange sense called magnetoreception manifests in mammals. Dogs wouldn't be the only animals thought to use magnetoreception: Birds do it, bees do it - and certain types of mammals do it, according to study coauthor Sabine Begall, a biologist at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany.
May 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Citizen scientists, environmentalists and anyone who lives near a power plant -- your services are requested. Climate change scientist Kevin Robert Gurney needs your help in a grand undertaking: the mapping of all the power plants in the world. It's a big job, and he and the people in his lab cannot do it alone. Gurney, an associate professor at Arizona State University, builds carbon dioxide emission data models that help him and others better understand how carbon moves around the planet and how it effects climate change.
September 8, 2008 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has changed the world. The way we learn, buy things, are entertained, view ourselves and everyone else -- all have been transformed by Google, which was incorporated in California 10 years ago Sunday. In the process, it has become one of the most powerful companies on the planet. It all began with Larry Page and Sergey Brin, two Stanford University graduate students who turned their research project into an Internet technology company. They bet that their search engine could run better than the rest and help, as they say, organize the world's information.
April 5, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory may be most famous for sending Curiosity to Mars and Voyager  to the edge of the solar system, but some of its coolest technology is being used right here on Earth. For the last month, a manned C-20A aircraft owned by NASA has been flying a powerful imaging radar system built and managed by JPL over the Americas to collect data on glacier activity, map the coastal mangroves in Latin America, study tiny changes in the Earth's surface caused by the movement of magna beneath active volcanoes, help scientists and government agencies figure out how to improve the levees in New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta, and look for evidence of a 2,000-year-old lost civilization in the Peruvian desert.  The radar's unweildy name is the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar, but it goes by UAVSAR.
August 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- He's the brains behind Google Earth, Maps and Street View. Now John Hanke is searching for new ways to connect people to the world around them. He runs Niantic Labs, essentially a tiny startup inside Google. Google Chief Executive Larry Page greenlighted Niantic's mission to re-imagine the physical world with augmented reality. So far it has produced two mobile apps. Field Trip is like a real-time guide book that digitally annotates the world. Your phone buzzes to deliver helpful information about your surroundings, pointing you to a cool new restaurant or a city landmark.
March 19, 2014 | Meghan Daum
Rush Limbaugh is right on this one. The reporting on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, has turned into a spectacle - not the good kind. It's all "such a show," Limbaugh told his listeners Monday. "We've got anchors and anchorettes who don't know beans about even why an airplane flies. They couldn't explain the concept of air pressure differential or lift to you if their jobs depended on it. " Actually it's even worse than "such a show": The lack of any real information has pushed television news to new levels of unintentional self-parody.
July 9, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
At first glance, Google's latest plan for global domination sounds very cool. Everyone's favorite pedal-to-the-metal, innovate-or-die tech company is throwing its Mensa-level brainpower behind the development of a computer operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows. But that's why you want to be worried.
August 9, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - This summer, tourists on the Tuscan island of Giglio have been heading for the pretty palm-lined beach at the port, soaking up the sun and swimming out to a line of buoys. Beyond is the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia, sitting in shallow water where passengers were sucked to their deaths by whirlpools created as the giant vessel lurched onto its side. Nineteen months after the 950-foot-long ship slammed into rocks off this Mediterranean island and came to a precarious rest on two granite outcrops, the captain, Francesco Schettino, is on trial on charges of manslaughter in the deaths of 32 people who never made it ashore on the night of Jan. 13, 2012.
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