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SCIENCE
May 6, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Ports like Los Angeles and Long Beach are key to the global economy: crossroads where billions of dollars in cargo arrive and depart each year , floating on board thousands of vessels from all over the world. Increasingly, however, large ports are also playing a key role in Earth's ecosystem, as species from all corners stow away on ships and make their way into ports -- sometimes, with devastating consequences for native wildlife.  For example, the Chinese mitten crab , which comes from the Pacific Coast of China and Korea, made its way to the U.S. West Coast on ships during the early 1990s and was first spotted in the Chesapeake Bay about 15 years later.  Fisherman catching shrimp have reported that the mitten crabs, which have patches of hair on their claws , get tangled in nets and can kill shrimp.  Because they burrow, invasive mitten crabs can also speed erosion in levees and banks.
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SCIENCE
April 5, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory may be most famous for sending Curiosity to Mars and Voyager  to the edge of the solar system, but some of its coolest technology is being used right here on Earth. For the last month, a manned C-20A aircraft owned by NASA has been flying a powerful imaging radar system built and managed by JPL over the Americas to collect data on glacier activity, map the coastal mangroves in Latin America, study tiny changes in the Earth's surface caused by the movement of magna beneath active volcanoes, help scientists and government agencies figure out how to improve the levees in New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta, and look for evidence of a 2,000-year-old lost civilization in the Peruvian desert.  The radar's unweildy name is the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar, but it goes by UAVSAR.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
The methods allegedly used by a group of teenagers suspected by authorities of burglarizing the homes of such stars as Lindsay Lohan, Orlando Bloom and Paris Hilton have again raised concerns about the intrusive glare of the paparazzi. According to detectives, the group used celebrity websites and paparazzi photos to track schedules and movements of the people they are suspected of burglarizing. They looked for times when the stars were scheduled to either be out of town or attending movie premieres and other events, police said.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Citizen scientists, environmentalists and anyone who lives near a power plant -- your services are requested. Climate change scientist Kevin Robert Gurney needs your help in a grand undertaking: the mapping of all the power plants in the world. It's a big job, and he and the people in his lab cannot do it alone. Gurney, an associate professor at Arizona State University, builds carbon dioxide emission data models that help him and others better understand how carbon moves around the planet and how it effects climate change.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2008 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has changed the world. The way we learn, buy things, are entertained, view ourselves and everyone else -- all have been transformed by Google, which was incorporated in California 10 years ago Sunday. In the process, it has become one of the most powerful companies on the planet. It all began with Larry Page and Sergey Brin, two Stanford University graduate students who turned their research project into an Internet technology company. They bet that their search engine could run better than the rest and help, as they say, organize the world's information.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
At first glance, Google's latest plan for global domination sounds very cool. Everyone's favorite pedal-to-the-metal, innovate-or-die tech company is throwing its Mensa-level brainpower behind the development of a computer operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows. But that's why you want to be worried.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | Matthew Shaer, Shaer is a staff writer at the Christian Science Monitor.
Asked in 2002 to describe the "ultimate" search engine, Google co-founder Sergey Brin half-jokingly pointed to HAL 9000, the supercomputer from the Stanley Kubrick film "2001: A Space Odyssey." "HAL . . . had a lot of information, could piece it together, could rationalize it," Brin told a PBS reporter. "Now hopefully . . . it would never have a bug like HAL did where he killed the occupants of the spaceship. But that's what we're striving for, and I think we've made it a part of the way there."
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- He's the brains behind Google Earth, Maps and Street View. Now John Hanke is searching for new ways to connect people to the world around them. He runs Niantic Labs, essentially a tiny startup inside Google. Google Chief Executive Larry Page greenlighted Niantic's mission to re-imagine the physical world with augmented reality. So far it has produced two mobile apps. Field Trip is like a real-time guide book that digitally annotates the world. Your phone buzzes to deliver helpful information about your surroundings, pointing you to a cool new restaurant or a city landmark.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - This summer, tourists on the Tuscan island of Giglio have been heading for the pretty palm-lined beach at the port, soaking up the sun and swimming out to a line of buoys. Beyond is the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia, sitting in shallow water where passengers were sucked to their deaths by whirlpools created as the giant vessel lurched onto its side. Nineteen months after the 950-foot-long ship slammed into rocks off this Mediterranean island and came to a precarious rest on two granite outcrops, the captain, Francesco Schettino, is on trial on charges of manslaughter in the deaths of 32 people who never made it ashore on the night of Jan. 13, 2012.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | Meghan Daum
Rush Limbaugh is right on this one. The reporting on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, has turned into a spectacle - not the good kind. It's all "such a show," Limbaugh told his listeners Monday. "We've got anchors and anchorettes who don't know beans about even why an airplane flies. They couldn't explain the concept of air pressure differential or lift to you if their jobs depended on it. " Actually it's even worse than "such a show": The lack of any real information has pushed television news to new levels of unintentional self-parody.
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