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OPINION
October 4, 2009 | Bernadette Murphy, Bernadette Murphy is the author of three books of narrative nonfiction and a forthcoming novel, "Grace Notes."
For five consecutive nights, I stood at my front door and watched the Station fire lick at the hillside. The tongues of shooting flame looked to be only a few hundred feet away. Actually, the fire was burning a mile and a half up the mountain from my home in La Crescenta. I live below Foothill Boulevard, I comforted myself. There was no way the fire was going to make it down here. We aren't like those crazy people who tempt fate by living in harm's way. Even after a 2 a.m. evacuation call, I believed my family and I were safe.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Welcome to the mobile mapping wars. It's the latest escalation in the heated competition between Apple and Google. The Internet search giant Wednesday showed off new features of its digital maps ahead of Apple's annual developer conference next week, but dodged questions about whether it's about to get the steel-tipped boot from Apple's iPhone and iPad. Google billed the event as "the next dimension" for its digital mapping service. The aim is to get even more people to use its maps even as Apple reportedly prepares to jettison Google as a built-in application in its mobile operating system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
The methods allegedly used by a group of teenagers suspected by authorities of burglarizing the homes of such stars as Lindsay Lohan, Orlando Bloom and Paris Hilton have again raised concerns about the intrusive glare of the paparazzi. According to detectives, the group used celebrity websites and paparazzi photos to track schedules and movements of the people they are suspected of burglarizing. They looked for times when the stars were scheduled to either be out of town or attending movie premieres and other events, police said.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2008 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. has changed the world. The way we learn, buy things, are entertained, view ourselves and everyone else -- all have been transformed by Google, which was incorporated in California 10 years ago Sunday. In the process, it has become one of the most powerful companies on the planet. It all began with Larry Page and Sergey Brin, two Stanford University graduate students who turned their research project into an Internet technology company. They bet that their search engine could run better than the rest and help, as they say, organize the world's information.
SCIENCE
April 5, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory may be most famous for sending Curiosity to Mars and Voyager  to the edge of the solar system, but some of its coolest technology is being used right here on Earth. For the last month, a manned C-20A aircraft owned by NASA has been flying a powerful imaging radar system built and managed by JPL over the Americas to collect data on glacier activity, map the coastal mangroves in Latin America, study tiny changes in the Earth's surface caused by the movement of magna beneath active volcanoes, help scientists and government agencies figure out how to improve the levees in New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta, and look for evidence of a 2,000-year-old lost civilization in the Peruvian desert.  The radar's unweildy name is the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar, but it goes by UAVSAR.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - This summer, tourists on the Tuscan island of Giglio have been heading for the pretty palm-lined beach at the port, soaking up the sun and swimming out to a line of buoys. Beyond is the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia, sitting in shallow water where passengers were sucked to their deaths by whirlpools created as the giant vessel lurched onto its side. Nineteen months after the 950-foot-long ship slammed into rocks off this Mediterranean island and came to a precarious rest on two granite outcrops, the captain, Francesco Schettino, is on trial on charges of manslaughter in the deaths of 32 people who never made it ashore on the night of Jan. 13, 2012.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- He's the brains behind Google Earth, Maps and Street View. Now John Hanke is searching for new ways to connect people to the world around them. He runs Niantic Labs, essentially a tiny startup inside Google. Google Chief Executive Larry Page greenlighted Niantic's mission to re-imagine the physical world with augmented reality. So far it has produced two mobile apps. Field Trip is like a real-time guide book that digitally annotates the world. Your phone buzzes to deliver helpful information about your surroundings, pointing you to a cool new restaurant or a city landmark.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
At first glance, Google's latest plan for global domination sounds very cool. Everyone's favorite pedal-to-the-metal, innovate-or-die tech company is throwing its Mensa-level brainpower behind the development of a computer operating system to rival Microsoft's Windows. But that's why you want to be worried.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | Matthew Shaer, Shaer is a staff writer at the Christian Science Monitor.
Asked in 2002 to describe the "ultimate" search engine, Google co-founder Sergey Brin half-jokingly pointed to HAL 9000, the supercomputer from the Stanley Kubrick film "2001: A Space Odyssey." "HAL . . . had a lot of information, could piece it together, could rationalize it," Brin told a PBS reporter. "Now hopefully . . . it would never have a bug like HAL did where he killed the occupants of the spaceship. But that's what we're striving for, and I think we've made it a part of the way there."
OPINION
February 18, 2011
Will man survive? Re "Patt Morrison Asks: Saving Earth," Opinion, Feb. 12 Patt Morrison did a good Q&A with Paul R. Ehrlich. I still have my original copy of his 1968 book, "The Population Bomb. " However, the article has a misleading title. The crisis we are facing does not involve saving the Earth or even saving the environment. Both will survive with or without our intervention. Rather, the title should have been, "Saving humans. " No matter what we do, the Earth and its environment will go on, much in the way that the Earth survived when the dinosaurs did not. Perhaps we are only a placeholder ?
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