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December 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Internet search provider Google Inc. announced it would expand the workforce at its European headquarters by 600, or 75%, over the next two to three years. The company's Dublin, Ireland, office, established in 2003, supports its European, Middle Eastern and African activities and is Google's largest base outside the United States. The Mountain View, Calif.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Shan Li
Swedish home goods giant Ikea Group is investing in its first wind farm in the U.S., joining a parade of other companies that are venturing into the renewable energy sector. The company purchased Hoopeston Wind, an energy project under construction in Illinois. The wind farm is expected to be up and running by the first half of 2015. Apex Clean Energy, a green power company in Charlottesville, Va., is building and running the project. PHOTOS: World's most expensive cities Steve Howard, chief sustainability offer at Ikea, said the investment will be good for the company's business and the nation's energy independence.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Giant online retailer Amazon.com Inc. is turning up the heat on rivals this holiday season and beyond under a new deal with the U.S. Postal Service for delivering packages on Sundays. Starting this week, the postal service will bring Amazon packages on Sundays to shoppers' doors in the Los Angeles and New York metropolitan areas at no extra charge. Next year, it plans to roll out year-round Sunday delivery to Dallas, New Orleans, Phoenix and other cities. Getting packages on Sundays normally is expensive for customers.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The "Heartbleed" software flaw that triggered alarm bells around the world could fundamentally undermine two decades' worth of efforts to persuade consumers they could trust the Web to securely handle such tasks as buying a pair of shoes and applying for a job. The discovery of a gaping hole in a piece of software that was supposed to protect personal information from hackers left websites rushing to fix the bug while consumers struggled to understand...
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the growth of Netflix, Amazon.com and other legal channels for watching entertainment online, the volume of pirated movies, TV shows, music, books and video games online continues to grow at a rapid pace. The amount of bandwidth used for copyright infringement in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific has grown nearly 160% from 2010 to 2012, accounting for 24% of total Internet bandwidth, according to a study from NetNames, the British brand protection firm. At the same time, the number of people engaged in copyright infringement has grown dramatically too. In January2013, 327 million unique users illegally sought copyrighted content, generating 14 billion page views on websites focused on piracy, up 10% from November 2011, according to the report.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - It's becoming a familiar scene in everybody's favorite city - luxury shuttles with Wi-Fi and plush seats barreling past sluggish, dilapidated city buses crammed with local residents standing elbow to elbow. The nerd convoy, ferrying workers to technology companies in Silicon Valley, has raised the ire of civic activists who see it as a symbol of a divide between the haves and have nots as the region's tech boom has sent housing costs and evictions soaring. But as heated as that backlash has become at times, it has obscured a much broader story that these buses have to tell about changes sweeping across not just San Francisco but also the entire Bay Area.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Second of two parts Phil Richards used to like his job driving a forklift in a produce and meat warehouse. He took pride in steering a case of beef with precision. Now, he says, he has to speed through the warehouse to meet quotas, tracked by bosses each step of the way. Through a headset, a voice tells him what to do and how much time he has to do it. It makes the Unified Grocers warehouse in Santa Fe Springs operate smoothly with fewer employees, but it also makes Richards' work stressful.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. believes that making big gambles can yield revolutionary advances, whether it be cars that drive themselves, wearable computers connected to the Internet or air balloons that beam wireless Internet access to remote areas of the world. Now it's searching for ways to keep people alive longer. The technology giant said Wednesday that it's a major investor in a venture that would work on combating aging and disease. But Google declined to provide any more details on how the venture would operate or what it would do. Google is not the first technology company to make the leap into healthcare.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - As soon as the credits rolled on "The Internship," Rachel Kang, a 20-year-old UC Berkeley sophomore from Torrance, headed straight back to her apartment to Google jobs at Google Inc. "I have always loved Google. I think everyone does. The movie just cemented my appreciation even more," Kang said after seeing a sneak preview of the film last month. "I do think a lot of people will be even more drawn to the company than they are now. " That's just what Google wants to hear.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google Inc. is making a splash in the world of digital TV receivers with its tiny, $35 Chromecast device. The new Google gadget rivals the Apple TV and all Roku devices. However, each digital receiver has its benefits and downsides. Here's how the three gadgets compare. Content By far the most important part of any digital TV receiver is the amount of content it has access to and the quality of that content. If you look at numbers alone, then Roku is far and away the clear winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Joe Flint and Meg James
Comcast Corp., already the nation's largest cable and Internet provider, says it needs to get bigger to compete against the formidable giants of Silicon Valley. The Philadelphia-based cable behemoth said in a government filing Tuesday that its proposed $40-billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. will benefit consumers without limiting competition. Both companies contend that they need muscle to compete against emerging competition from Google Inc., Apple Inc., Netflix Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. Comcast said in a 175-page document filed with the Federal Communications Commission that the deal would mean better Internet and cable TV service for millions of consumers.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - It's becoming a familiar scene in everybody's favorite city - luxury shuttles with Wi-Fi and plush seats barreling past sluggish, dilapidated city buses crammed with local residents standing elbow to elbow. The nerd convoy, ferrying workers to technology companies in Silicon Valley, has raised the ire of civic activists who see it as a symbol of a divide between the haves and have nots as the region's tech boom has sent housing costs and evictions soaring. But as heated as that backlash has become at times, it has obscured a much broader story that these buses have to tell about changes sweeping across not just San Francisco but also the entire Bay Area.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Aaron Levie, the 29-year-old chief executive of Box Inc., walked the red carpet at the Oscars this year in a dark suit and tie, pressed white shirt and his trademark neon blue sneakers. "I asked about the sneaker dress code," said Levie, who like many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs doesn't like anything slowing him down, least of all a pair of dress shoes. "Apparently it was not a problem. " It was the movie industry's biggest night and Levie didn't waste any time talking up cloud computing to Hollywood stars including Harrison Ford.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - A tussle involving a woman wearing Google Glass in a San Francisco bar is just the latest incident to highlight growing tensions over the new wearable technology even before Google Inc. begins selling it to the public. Sarah Slocum, a 34-year-old technology blogger and social media consultant, said she was "verbally and physically assaulted" over the weekend by patrons of a bar in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood. A man allegedly ripped the Glass off Slocum's face and ran out of the bar with it. She got the Glass back but says someone stole her purse and phone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - In a ruling that a dissenting judge called "unprecedented," a federal appeals court ordered Google Inc. on Wednesday to take down an anti-Muslim video that an actress said forced her to leave her home because of death threats. Google said it would appeal the ruling, but removed the video, "Innocence of Muslims," from YouTube and other platforms. The video has incited violent Muslim protests and has been banned by several Muslim countries. The 2 to 1 decision by the 9 t h U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the actress who appeared in the film never consented to being in it and her performance may be protected by copyright law. "While answering a casting call for a low-budget amateur film doesn't often lead to stardom, it also rarely turns an aspiring actress into the subject of a fatwa ," Chief Judge Alex Kozinski wrote for the majority.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Want to engrave a few words in Chinese on your new iPad? No problem - Apple offers consumers in mainland China free personalization. Just don't get too political. Say you type in the Dalai Lama's name in Chinese characters into Apple's online store engraving service. You'll receive a yellow pop-up box saying, "The engraved text is not suitable. " Other phrases that return the same error notice include "Tibet independence," "Xinjiang independence" and "Taiwan independence.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Google Inc. has reached a tentative settlement with European antitrust regulators to end an investigation into allegations it abused its search-engine dominance to promote its own services over those of rivals. The deal, announced Wednesday in Brussels, could end a lengthy probe and allow Google to avoid a large fine and other penalties from European regulators. Under the settlement, Google has promised that whenever it promotes its own specialized services in search results it also will promote the services of three competitors, the European Union's competition commissioner said.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
At times, Andy Shih still finds himself overwhelmed by the groundswell of interest in autism apps he's seen in the three years since Apple Inc. released the first iPad. In his role as senior vice president for scientific affairs at Autism Speaks, a national advocacy organization based in New York, Shih helped organize a "hacking autism" event in San Francisco with cosponsor AT&T Inc. that drew 135 developers. It was the group's third event, following previous hackathons co-sponsored with Hewlett-Packard Co. and Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Google Inc. has reached a tentative settlement with European antitrust regulators to end an investigation into allegations it abused its search-engine dominance to promote its own services over those of rivals. The deal, announced Wednesday in Brussels, could end a lengthy probe and allow Google to avoid a large fine and other penalties from European regulators. Under the settlement, Google has promised that whenever it promotes its own specialized services in search results it also will promote the services of three competitors, the European Union's competition commissioner said.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - As far as Wall Street is concerned, Google Inc. can build all the robots and self-driving cars that it wants as long as it keeps growing its main business: online advertising. And increasingly, that means selling ads that are shown on mobile devices. Google reported Thursday that fourth-quarter net income and revenue rose 17%, to $3.38 billion and $16.86 billion, respectively. The technology giant, however, continued to struggle with a decline in online ad prices.
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