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BUSINESS
February 8, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
A consumer watchdog has escalated its efforts to block Google from rolling out a controversial new privacy policy that would allow the Internet search giant to harvest more information about its users. But the Electronic Privacy Information Center is not suing Google. Instead, it filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday against the Federal Trade Commission, the agency charged with protecting consumers' privacy on the Web. In an unusual end run around the FTC, the watchdog group is asking a federal judge to issue a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to compel federal regulators to enforce a settlement they reached with Google last year and protect consumers who will be "left without recourse if the commission fails to enforce its order.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Amazon.com is back up after nearly an hour in which its website would not load Monday. Some users saw a message saying the website was temporarily unavailable while improvements were being made. Others saw an error saying, “Oops! We're very sorry, but we're having trouble doing what you just asked us to do.” But as of 12:40 p.m., the site was back up and running. PHOTOS: The 10 biggest tech gadget fails The downtime for Amazon comes a few days after Google services were unreachable for a few minutes.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Google and many of its services, including its popular email service Gmail, are being blocked in China, according to a report from GreatFire.org, a Chinese website that monitors outages. Google could not be immediately reached for comment. [ Updated at 9:33 a.m.: In an emailed statement later, Google said: "We've checked and there's nothing wrong on our end. "] The search giant has weathered intermittent outages in the world's most populous market since Google said it would end its practice of acquiescing to Chinese government officials' demands to censor search results in China nearly three years ago. Quiz: How much do you know about China's economy?
BUSINESS
May 13, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Cloud storage for three of Google's more popular services -- Gmail, Googe Drive and Google+ -- are being combined to give users more control over how they want to use the storage space. By combining them, users will now have access to 15 gigabytes of storage for free that they can use for their emails, Google documents and photos on the Google+ social network. Previously, users had 10 GB that they could use for Gmail and an additional 5 GB for Google Drive and Google+ photos. More storage is available for a monthly fee. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 "Maybe you're a heavy Gmail user but light on photos, or perhaps you were bumping up against your Drive storage limit but were only using 2 GB in Gmail," Google said in a blog post . "Now it doesn't matter, because you can use your storage the way you want.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Organizers of this weekend's 85th Academy Awards have partnered with Google to create a landing page that puts all of the information about this year's nominees in one place. The site -- google.com/Oscars -- went live Tuesday night and was released along with a video compilation of the year's top movie moments, similar in style to the popular Zeitgeist videos the search engine releases each year. The Oscars site incorporates a variety of Google services -- including YouTube, Google Maps and Google Hangouts -- and provides an interactive chart showing which films and actors would take home Oscars were the awards handed out based on online search frequency.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The next time you try to comment on a video or upload one, YouTube will ask you if you want to drop your username and start using your real one. The world's most popular online video service has begun a push to move away from anonymity and become more uniform with other Google services, notably Google+, by having you use your actual name. While you don't have to switch to your real name, YouTube will ask you for a little explanation when you try to tell it no. First you must click a button saying "I don't want to use my full name.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Amazon.com is back up after nearly an hour in which its website would not load Monday. Some users saw a message saying the website was temporarily unavailable while improvements were being made. Others saw an error saying, “Oops! We're very sorry, but we're having trouble doing what you just asked us to do.” But as of 12:40 p.m., the site was back up and running. PHOTOS: The 10 biggest tech gadget fails The downtime for Amazon comes a few days after Google services were unreachable for a few minutes.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. Chairman Eric Schmidt, defending his company on Capitol Hill for the first time as it faces increased scrutiny of its operations, bluntly denied that his company "cooked" its search engine results to send users to its growing stable of online services. Schmidt faced tough questions Wednesday from members of the Senate antitrust subcommittee, who have been investigating complaints by competitors that Google is abusing its dominance in the online search market to harm competition.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. said it is changing its official policy so it can track users across all Google services including email, Web search and YouTube in a move that could invite heavier scrutiny of its privacy practices. The new policy, which takes effect March 1, affects hundreds of millions of users who log into Google on their desktops or on their mobile devices. The only way to turn off the data sharing is to quit Google. "If you're signed in, we may combine information you've provided from one service with information from other services," Alma Whitten, Google's director of privacy for product and engineering, wrote in a company blog post.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. rolled out its new privacy policy Thursday to renewed protests from data protection authorities in Europe. Those authorities have concluded that the new policy violates European law, European Union Justice Commissioner Viviane Reding told BBC Radio 4. France's data protection authority has taken the lead in probing the new policy. "They have come to the conclusion that they are deeply concerned, and that the new rules are not in accordance with the European law, and that the transparency rules have not been applied," Reding said, according to Reuters.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Organizers of this weekend's 85th Academy Awards have partnered with Google to create a landing page that puts all of the information about this year's nominees in one place. The site -- google.com/Oscars -- went live Tuesday night and was released along with a video compilation of the year's top movie moments, similar in style to the popular Zeitgeist videos the search engine releases each year. The Oscars site incorporates a variety of Google services -- including YouTube, Google Maps and Google Hangouts -- and provides an interactive chart showing which films and actors would take home Oscars were the awards handed out based on online search frequency.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Google and many of its services, including its popular email service Gmail, are being blocked in China, according to a report from GreatFire.org, a Chinese website that monitors outages. Google could not be immediately reached for comment. [ Updated at 9:33 a.m.: In an emailed statement later, Google said: "We've checked and there's nothing wrong on our end. "] The search giant has weathered intermittent outages in the world's most populous market since Google said it would end its practice of acquiescing to Chinese government officials' demands to censor search results in China nearly three years ago. Quiz: How much do you know about China's economy?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Google unveiled the channel lineup for its much-anticipated Google Fiber high-speed service which is launching in Kansas City, Mo., and will compete with cable and satellite TV there. Among the channels being offered by Google Fiber are Showtime, Comedy Central, Discovery, Lifetime, USA, Encore and CNBC. However, the service is missing some big networks in Time Warner's HBO, TNT and CNN, Walt Disney Co.'s ESPN and Disney Channel and News Corp.'s Fox News and FX. That doesn't mean those channels are saying no to Google, just that deals have not been reached yet. HBO expects to be on the service shortly and an ESPN spokesman said the two are having "productive discussions.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2012 | By Ryan Faughnder, Los Angeles Times
Kansas City is about to get some ultra-fast Internet. Google Inc.is rolling out its much-anticipated "gigabit" Internet service Google Fiber, which the company says will enable users to download, upload and stream 100 times faster than normal. The Internet search giant has been laying a network of fiber cables throughout the region for the last several months. Google chose the Kansas City region of Missouri and Kansas to showcase the project, which will also include a cable TV package.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The next time you try to comment on a video or upload one, YouTube will ask you if you want to drop your username and start using your real one. The world's most popular online video service has begun a push to move away from anonymity and become more uniform with other Google services, notably Google+, by having you use your actual name. While you don't have to switch to your real name, YouTube will ask you for a little explanation when you try to tell it no. First you must click a button saying "I don't want to use my full name.
OPINION
May 22, 2012
Re "Is it possible to get a human on the phone at Google?," Column, May 18 I agree with David Lazarus that it is frustrating to be unable to contact a "live" person for customer service. Some companies offer free live help for a limited time after you buy a product. Before I buy a product that may require help to use, I always ask about the customer support policy. Google, however, is a totally different issue. It is not charging for the use of its search engine. Its revenue comes from advertisers, which I am sure have no problem contacting Google by phone to talk with a sales rep. I can understand Google not providing live telephone support because the users pay nothing for services.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2010 | By David Pierson, reporting from beijing and Jessica Guynn
Reporting from San Francisco and Beijing Jessica Guynn -- In its public wrangling with the Chinese government, Google Inc. not only risks losing access to millions of personal computers in China but also its toehold in the world's largest cellphone market. The U.S. technology giant has been providing Chinese handset manufacturers its Android operating system for free in hopes of penetrating a country where, soon, more people are expected to access the Internet on mobile phones than on desktop computers.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Google Inc., owner of the most popular Internet search engine, will introduce a service that measures websites' audience size, helping online marketers fine-tune their ads. Spokesman Brandon McCormick confirmed that Google was working on the program, without elaborating on its features or giving a release date.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. rolled out its new privacy policy Thursday to renewed protests from data protection authorities in Europe. Those authorities have concluded that the new policy violates European law, European Union Justice Commissioner Viviane Reding told BBC Radio 4. France's data protection authority has taken the lead in probing the new policy. "They have come to the conclusion that they are deeply concerned, and that the new rules are not in accordance with the European law, and that the transparency rules have not been applied," Reding said, according to Reuters.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
A consumer watchdog has escalated its efforts to block Google from rolling out a controversial new privacy policy that would allow the Internet search giant to harvest more information about its users. But the Electronic Privacy Information Center is not suing Google. Instead, it filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday against the Federal Trade Commission, the agency charged with protecting consumers' privacy on the Web. In an unusual end run around the FTC, the watchdog group is asking a federal judge to issue a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to compel federal regulators to enforce a settlement they reached with Google last year and protect consumers who will be "left without recourse if the commission fails to enforce its order.
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