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NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Generally, these haven't been good times for science fairs -- budget cuts at schools and tough family finances have meant that fewer kids get the opportunity to hypothesize, test and conclude; to beg their mom to neatly stencil their work onto a large poster display (at the last minute, for maximum dramatic effect); and, if they're lucky, to win a ribbon or trophy for their (her?) work. But this year, budding scientists around the world will get a chance to submit science projects electronically to Google's online science fair , set to take place in May. The company called for entries on Tuesday, and will accept submissions until April 4.  Kids interested in the health sciences can submit projects in biology, food science or several other applicable categories.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has announced the latest versions of its buck-the-trend Chromebook line of computers. The two Web-centric computers introduced by the Internet company are made by Samsung. They are the Chrome Series 5 550, a laptop, and the Chromebox, which is a small desktop that looks very much like Apple's Mac mini. The computers have received a hardware update over their predecessors and now boot in less than seven seconds, according to Google. The new Chromebooks are three times faster than the first set of Chromebooks released last year.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Hey, small businesses of California, Google wants to help you build a website. On Thursday the company launched a program called "California Get Your Business Online" that offers small businesses in the Golden State the opportunity to get a free customizable website, as well as access to in-person training on how to build a successful online business. Google will spring for the domain name and provide free Web hosting for the first year, then businesses will pay $2 monthly for the domain name and $4.99 monthly for Web hosting.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
After the Supreme Court's rulings Wednesday in favor of marriage equality, many Silicon Valley tech giants joined in the celebrations. Apple, which in 2008 donated $100,000 to fight California's same-sex marriage ban, told AllThingsD that it strongly supports marriage equality. ALSO: Google the word 'gay' and see a rainbow "We consider it a civil rights issue. We applaud the Supreme Court for its decisions today,” the company said.  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to his timeline to share with followers that he felt proud of his country for the day's decisions.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Tropical Storm Isaac appears to be making a beeline for New Orleans and the southern coast of Louisiana. And the National Weather service warns that by the time the storm makes landfall late Tuesday or early Wednesday, it will no longer be a tropical storm, but a Category 1 hurricane. Many across the nation are crossing their fingers that those in the projected path of the storm will stay safe. Google however, has done something more concrete: The company's crisis response team has created a map that provides information about, among other things, where the storm is headed, wind-speed probabilities, locations of and live feeds from webcams, current traffic conditions, active shelters and evacuation routes.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | by Joy Press
Before Michael Chabon's novel "Telegraph Avenue" goes on sale, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author will join us for a video chat to talk about the book. Come watch the video interview Monday at 11 a.m. PST. "Telegraph Avenue" is the a story of a struggling record store -- Brokeland Records -- on the border of Oakland and Berkeley. In our review , Carolyn Kellogg writes, "' Telegraph Avenue' is so exuberant, it's as if Michael Chabon has pulled joy from the air and squeezed it into the shape of words.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2009 | Veronique de Turenne, De Turenne is a Los Angeles writer and blogger.
Is anyone still unclear on the concept of the blog? Self-publishing on the Internet is the short answer, with millions of bloggers creating endless variations on the theme. There's the news blog, the politics blog, the travel blog, photo blogs, family blogs, humor blogs and, a natural for the form, the personal journal. That's what Katie Kampenfelt is writing when we meet her in the opening pages of Allison Burnett's canny third novel, "Undiscovered Gyrl." Katie's enough of a techie to have been enrolled in computer camp the summer before high school, but already so troubled by her parents' divorce that she wound up in a psych ward instead.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
Think you're a Google Search power user? You might not know all the ways to get faster, more focused search results. Here are five tips: Exclude terms. If you're looking for information on Vikings, the old Norse explorers, you don't want pages on football's Minnesota Vikings. Use a minus sign to tell Google to exclude pages that contain a certain word, like this: Vikings - Minnesota . Site search. Limit your search to a single website or a specific group of sites, by using site: followed by a Web address or ending.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2009 | Joe Flint
Continuing a recent tradition, Google Inc. Chief Executive Eric Schmidt held court with the press Thursday at the Allen & Co. conference in Sun Valley, Idaho, where he called the current economy "the new normal." Companies need to "figure out how to be happy and get our lives together in this new configuration," Schmidt said, adding, "You can't waste money, credit is tight." Schmidt, who was joined by Google co-founder Larry Page, spoke on a variety of topics, including Apple Inc.
OPINION
February 15, 2010
Google's plan to build an ultra-fast broadband service is so appealing, it defies credulity. The speed -- 1 gigabit per second -- is about 200 times faster than the fastest connections available in the U.S. today. Alas, for the vast majority of Internet users, Google's gambit is is too good to be true. The new fiber-optic lines will be deployed in only a handful of communities, reaching no more than half a million people. But the point for Google isn't to go head to head with the broadband services already offered by AT&T, Comcast and other phone and cable TV companies.
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