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May 1, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Since being announced in 2012, Google's Glass smart eyewear has been generating plenty of buzz and interest. The device is similar to a smartphone and lets users watch videos, send messages to friends, and even send tweets. Developers who purchased an early version of the device last summer for $1,500 have begun receiving Glass and one user has already said he will not live another day of his life without the device. For the rest of the world that wants to know exactly how Glass works, Google uploaded a explainer video Tuesday.
October 16, 2012 | By James Rainey
With the outcome of the presidential election still very much in doubt, Tuesday night's debate on New York's Long Island promises to be one of the most heavily watched and thoroughly scrutinized events of the long campaign. Robin Abcarian has logged thousands of miles and countless hours on the campaign trail for the Los Angeles Times. She joins me, Politics Now blog host Jim Rainey, at 1 p.m. PDT for a video discussion of the upcoming showdown between President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney.
March 21, 2010 | By Sara Scribner
The current generation of kindergartners to 12th graders -- those born between 1991 and 2004 -- has no memory of a time before Google. But although these students are far more tech savvy than their parents and are perpetually connected to the Internet, they know a lot less than they think. And worse, they don't know what they don't know. As a librarian in the Pasadena Unified School District, I teach students research skills. But I've just been pink-slipped, along with five other middle school and high school librarians, and only a parcel tax on the city's May ballot can save the district's libraries.
December 18, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Embarrassed that you can't remember the lyrics to Christmas carols? Google has come to the rescue. The search giant has rolled out a feature for its mobile app that gives iPhone and Android smartphone users the words and the music to popular Christmas songs. To be the life of the Christmas party, users must open the app on their device and then say "OK Google" followed by "Let's go caroling. " The command will prompt Google to pull up a page asking users which carol they would like to sing.
September 19, 2009 | Alex Pham
The Justice Department late Friday urged a federal judge to reject a controversial settlement between Google Inc., the Authors Guild and the American Assn. of Publishers, citing concerns that the agreement could run afoul of antitrust, class action and copyright laws. At the same time, Justice officials proposed modifications that would make the settlement pass muster, saying the proposal should not be entirely derailed because it has "potential for important societal benefits."
March 9, 2014 | By Christopher Chabris and Jonathan Wai
Laszlo Bock, the head of human resources at Google, made quite a splash with his announcement last year that the technology firm has changed the way it hires people. Gone are the brainteaser-style interview questions that so many candidates abhorred. But also gone, it would seem, is any concern with discovering how smart applicants really are. "GPAs are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless.... We found that they don't predict anything," Bock told the New York Times.
July 2, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Google has offered to settle an antitrust probe from European Union regulators to avoid a hefty fine and major changes to how it operates its lucrative online search business. Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman, made the offer in a letter to Joaquín Almunia, the European competition commissioner. The European Commission conducted an 18-month-long investigation into Google. The European Commission warned in May that Google may have abused its market dominance in Web search and could face formal charges for putting its competitors at a disadvantage.
July 14, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Google gave a gilded nod to the 150th birthday of Austrian artist Gustav Klimt on Saturday with a Google doodle interpreting one of the symbolist painter's most famous works. The original version of “The Kiss,” depicts a couple mid-embrace and was inspired by the Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau movements. Some of Klimt's best-known work was gilded, completed during his “Golden Phase.” The painter was a prominent member of the Vienna Secession, a group of artists who left the Assn.
November 2, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
A lot of people still don't understand why certain advertisers target them while they are searching the Web. Google is rolling out a new feature that explains why its users see certain ads when they search Google or check their Gmail. The move comes as Google, like other Internet companies, finds itself in the cross hairs of lawmakers and regulators as they scrutinize how consumers' personal information is collected and used online. Google says it tries to be transparent about the information it collects and show consumers the most relevant ads. "Our advertising system is designed to show the right ad to the right person at the right time.
August 13, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has begun rolling out custom URLs to some verified accounts and pages on Google+, the company said Monday. The Mountain View, Calif., company made the announcement on its Google+ profile page, which can now be found at . The new feature, which has always been on Twitter and has been a part of Facebook for some time now, is currently limited to just some brand pages and celebrities, but Google said it...
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