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Gop Filibuster

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NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Senate Republicans who blocked the second of three of President Obama's recent nominees to an important federal appeals court this week deserve most of the bad things being said about them. The filibustering of qualified nominees to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is blatantly partisan and intellectually dishonest. The Republicans claim they are blocking the nominations because the D.C. Circuit is underworked and could get by with fewer judges - and besides, Obama is trying to “pack” the court with liberals.
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NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - With sought-after women voters at stake, Senate Republicans blocked election-year legislation Wednesday aimed at ensuring that female workers receive equal pay for doing the same work as men. A high-profile campaign for the Paycheck Fairness Act, orchestrated by the Democratic-controlled Senate and the White House, did little to motivate Republicans in a mid-term election year when both parties are seeking women voters. Republican senators blocked the bill on a party-line filibuster, 53-44, with many waging a protest vote over party leaders' refusal to allow amendments.
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NATIONAL
January 28, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey
Laying out a possible path to approving healthcare legislation, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) said Wednesday that the House should pass the Senate's version and then use a process known as "budget reconciliation" to make the changes some lawmakers are demanding. The politically fraught strategy might allow Democrats to salvage a version of the overhaul that senior lawmakers pushed through the House and Senate late last year. Because budget reconciliation requires only a simple majority in the Senate, it could enable Democrats to circumvent a threatened GOP filibuster.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Senate Republicans who blocked the second of three of President Obama's recent nominees to an important federal appeals court this week deserve most of the bad things being said about them. The filibustering of qualified nominees to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is blatantly partisan and intellectually dishonest. The Republicans claim they are blocking the nominations because the D.C. Circuit is underworked and could get by with fewer judges - and besides, Obama is trying to “pack” the court with liberals.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2009 | James Oliphant
After months of keeping a low profile on healthcare, there was Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) on the Don Imus radio show this week, warning that Democrats better not take his vote for granted. Sen. Roland W. Burris, the scandal-plagued freshman Democrat from Illinois, blasted out a news release declaring that he had "emerged as a key player in the healthcare debate." Even Sen. Ben Nelson, the centrist Democrat from Nebraska who has enjoyed months of White House wooing, made a point of reminding a scrum of reporters in the Capitol that he was still uncommitted.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Senate leaders withdrew legislation that would have mandated major cuts in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions after falling a dozen votes shy of ending a GOP filibuster. Although the bill enjoyed bipartisan support, the weeklong floor debate devolved into partisan bickering over which party was most responsive to the plight of Americans trying to cope with rising gas prices. The bill would have cut greenhouse gas emissions 18% below 2005 levels by 2020 and nearly 70% by midcentury.
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
After stumbling last week, the effort to end the policy banning gay troops from serving openly in the military received a boost Wednesday, as the House approved a measure repealing the policy in an effort to force the Senate to do the same before lawmakers go home for the holidays. The House vote on the "don't ask, don't tell" policy -- essentially a repeat of a similar vote in May -- puts fresh pressure on the Senate leaders to prioritize the repeal as they struggle to schedule votes on a handful of last-chance priorities for Democrats.
OPINION
May 8, 2005
In response to "The Republicans' Filibuster Lie," Commentary, May 3: Missing from David Greenberg's otherwise excellent analysis of the Republican lie on judicial filibusters is perhaps the ultimate in delicious irony: Bush nominee Richard Allen Griffin, whose ascent to the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has been blocked by Democrats, is the son of Republican Sen. Robert P. Griffin, the former Michigan lawmaker who in 1968 led the GOP filibuster opposing...
NATIONAL
January 18, 2010 | By Jim Oliphant and Mark Z. Barabak
President Obama swooped into Massachusetts on Sunday on a mission to rescue his party's struggling U.S. Senate candidate and prevent the collapse of the Democrats' healthcare overhaul. "Understand what's at stake here," Obama told a spirited crowd of about 1,500 people assembled in a small arena at Northeastern University. "It's whether we're going forwards or going backwards." Massachusetts, which has not elected a Republican to the Senate since the Nixon administration, may have been the last place Obama expected to show up this month.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The political battle over President Obama's plan to keep student loan interest rates from skyrocketing escalated as Senate Republicans blocked a Democratic proposal to tax wealthier earners to pay for it. Republicans stopped the effort with a filibuster, even as some in the GOP view this as a politically risky move at a time when middle-class families continue to struggle to afford college. Rates for 7 million new undergraduate student loans are set to double to 6.8% on July 1 if Congress fails to act. The vote was 52-45, failing to reach the 60-vote threshold needed to overcome the GOP filibuster.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - In blocking the nomination of Rep. Mel Watt to head a top housing agency, Senate Republicans showed they preferred to keep oversight of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the hands of a career bureaucrat who opposes providing more aggressive aid for struggling homeowners. Watt, a Democrat from North Carolina, was nominated by President Obama to be director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The nomination failed a key procedural vote Thursday. The White House and congressional Democrats plan to continue to press for Watt to replace acting Director Edward J. DeMarco, who has led the housing regulatory agency since 2009.
OPINION
July 14, 2013
Re "Senate Democrats threaten filibuster change," July 12 So, the GOP is threatening to "shut down" the Senate if the filibuster rule is tweaked to allow a simple majority to approve executive branch nominations. Through their historic abuse of the filibuster, Republicans have already shut down the Senate. As for their threat to use the rule change against a future Democratic minority: With the Republican Party in a demographic death spiral, when will they ever have a Senate majority again?
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Fifteen GOP senators called on President Obama to withdraw Chuck Hagel's nomination to lead the Pentagon, even as support from another Republican increased the likelihood he will be confirmed when Congress returns from recess next week. In a letter to the White House, senators warned it would be unprecedented for such a controversial choice to be installed at the Defense Department. “Over the last half-century, no Secretary of Defense has been confirmed and taken office with more than three senators voting against him,” the group, led by Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas)
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Senate Republicans vowed Thursday to block a final vote to confirm Chuck Hagel as Defense secretary until after next week's Presidents Day recess, arguing Democrats were unnecessarily rushing a vote on a controversial choice. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) has nonetheless called for a vote Thursday afternoon seeking to end the what he called a GOP filibuster - a vote that will likely fall short of the 60-vote threshold needed to proceed. But several key Republicans pledged to support moving forward with a final confirmation vote when the Senate returns on Feb. 25, saying the 10-day delay would allow more senators to study Hagel's full record and allow remaining concerns to be satisfied.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The political battle over President Obama's plan to keep student loan interest rates from skyrocketing escalated as Senate Republicans blocked a Democratic proposal to tax wealthier earners to pay for it. Republicans stopped the effort with a filibuster, even as some in the GOP view this as a politically risky move at a time when middle-class families continue to struggle to afford college. Rates for 7 million new undergraduate student loans are set to double to 6.8% on July 1 if Congress fails to act. The vote was 52-45, failing to reach the 60-vote threshold needed to overcome the GOP filibuster.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Republicans blocked a vote on President Obama's pick for a seat on the crucial federal appeals court in Washington, dealing the White House a setback as it continues to struggle to fill judicial vacancies across the nation. The Senate GOP filibustered the nomination of Caitlin Halligan, a New York lawyer who had won praise from some conservatives. Republicans said they were concerned about Halligan's record on gun rights and terrorism detainee issues. All but one — Alaska's Lisa Murkowski — voted to prevent her nomination from going to the floor for a final vote, where the judge could have been approved by a simple majority.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Senate Republicans vowed Thursday to block a final vote to confirm Chuck Hagel as Defense secretary until after next week's Presidents Day recess, arguing Democrats were unnecessarily rushing a vote on a controversial choice. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) has nonetheless called for a vote Thursday afternoon seeking to end the what he called a GOP filibuster - a vote that will likely fall short of the 60-vote threshold needed to proceed. But several key Republicans pledged to support moving forward with a final confirmation vote when the Senate returns on Feb. 25, saying the 10-day delay would allow more senators to study Hagel's full record and allow remaining concerns to be satisfied.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Fifteen GOP senators called on President Obama to withdraw Chuck Hagel's nomination to lead the Pentagon, even as support from another Republican increased the likelihood he will be confirmed when Congress returns from recess next week. In a letter to the White House, senators warned it would be unprecedented for such a controversial choice to be installed at the Defense Department. “Over the last half-century, no Secretary of Defense has been confirmed and taken office with more than three senators voting against him,” the group, led by Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas)
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
After stumbling last week, the effort to end the policy banning gay troops from serving openly in the military received a boost Wednesday, as the House approved a measure repealing the policy in an effort to force the Senate to do the same before lawmakers go home for the holidays. The House vote on the "don't ask, don't tell" policy -- essentially a repeat of a similar vote in May -- puts fresh pressure on the Senate leaders to prioritize the repeal as they struggle to schedule votes on a handful of last-chance priorities for Democrats.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey and Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Senate on Tuesday advanced the Obama administration's aid package for small business but failed to relieve millions of companies from onerous new tax filings, accelerating the election year debate over which party is most responsible for gridlock in Washington and lost jobs on Main Street. Two Republicans joined Democrats in the vote to move the bill, which includes a $30-billion loan fund and other tax breaks for small businesses. But lawmakers could not reach agreement on a way to spare small businesses from a new requirement to notify the Internal Revenue Service of every purchase of goods worth more than $600.
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