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Gordon Miller

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April 2, 2006 | Debra J. Miller, Debra J. Miller teaches English at a private high school in Los Angeles.
On Thursday, Oct. 8, 1964, the day the police decided my mother killed my father, I woke up late, the kind of late that snaps you out of your favorite dream, the one where you're wrapped in the arms of your favorite TV hunk--mine was Dr. Kildare--and he's just about to . . . when bang your unconscious tells you the sun is out, the lights are on all over the house and you're going to be late for school because nobody got you out of bed. We were a family of five. I was 14 and the oldest.
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SPORTS
November 19, 2009 | By Steve Harvey
Cleveland (1-8) versus Detroit (1-8): They don't come any smaller than this. But which team really is worse? Both cities are indulging in a little one-downmanship on that question. Lions fans Gordon Miller and John Crick are marketing something for Detroit fans to wave: "The Official We ARE Terrible Towel" ($10 apiece). As the Detroit Free Press pointed out, the towels are white -- naturally. But Cleveland has its backers. The Browns' sitcom was on national TV on Monday -- a 16-0 loss to Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES
You might want to think carefully before dialing "Room Service" at Canoga Park's West Valley Playhouse. Chiefly remembered nowadays as a problematic 1938 movie vehicle for the Marx Brothers, this onetime Broadway hit by John Murray and Allen Boretz proves a seriously dated period farce. The formulaic backstage antics revolve around an unscrupulous producer's efforts to get his latest show on the boards.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Room Service," which is getting a big, stylish, knockabout revival at the Laguna Playhouse's Moulton Theater, couldn't be written today. It reflects a bygone era when Broadway played a crowning role in the national culture even as Hollywood was stealing its glory, if not yet its thunder.
SPORTS
May 17, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Howard Twitty, who has helped rebuild his game by reading Ben Hogan's instructional book, shot his second straight two-under-par 68 Friday to tie David Edwards for the lead at 136 in the second round of the Colonial National Invitation golf tournament at Fort Worth. Hogan, the legendary player who once called Colonial his home course and who won the tournament five times, published a book a generation ago, listing what he called the five fundamentals of golf.
SPORTS
April 12, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Blake's perseverance and Andy Roddick's power gave the United States a commanding lead over France in the Davis Cup quarterfinals. Blake fought off two match points to beat Paul-Henri Mathieu, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (3), 6-3, 3-6, 7-5 on Friday to give the U.S. a 2-0 lead in the best-of-five series at Winston-Salem, N.C. Roddick had 30 aces on the indoor hard-court in a 6-4, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5) victory over Michael Llodra in the opening match.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Don't ask Robert Woodruff to compare his staging of "The Tempest" (opening Monday at the La Jolla Playhouse) to anybody else's. He's never seen another production. "My mind is virtually uncluttered--empty," said the director. Well, not exactly. For the past several months, he and set designer Doug Stein have been carving out a definite image of the piece. "We tried lots of things," Woodruff said. "Like a motel; that was silly. But when I saw this set (design), I said, 'This is the play.'
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
From its perch on Mt. Washington, the Southwest Museum's incredible night views of the city were being enjoyed to the hilt by the city's cultural and social leaders who flocked up the hill the other evening for Southwest's 80th anniversary gala.
IMAGE
November 23, 2008 | Monica Corcoran, Corcoran is a Times staff writer.
In a perfect world, nails wouldn't chip and our follicles would never betray us and spit out gray hairs. But in real life, we need maintenance. American women spent enough on that last year to help make U.S. hair salons a $6-billion business, and that's in addition to what we shelled out to spiff up the rest of us. A year ago, grooming costs didn't raise a perfectly arched brow. Now, we're tallying each treatment and taking matters into our own hands.
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