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SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Dian Fossey, a naturalist who chronicled her life among the gorillas of Rwanda in the book "Gorillas in the Mist," was honored Thursday with a Google Doodle.  Her work with what she called "the greatest of the great apes" helped to recast the 400-pound gorillas as gentle giants desperately in need of protection from poachers.  In the doodle you'll notice a close up of a gorilla's nose. Fossey used gorilla's individual "noseprints" to help identify them.  PHOTOS: Fascinating animal discoveries of 2013 Fossey was 6 feet tall, a San Francisco native and a chain smoker.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- More improvement was reported Tuesday from the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in the saga of gorilla Imani and her 13-day-old baby. Both have had their medical challenges. Imani needed a Caesarian-section to deliver. Her baby underwent surgery for a collapsed lung and then treatment for pneumonia. On Monday, the pair were in contact for the first time. And on Tuesday, they walked into their outdoor exhibit with other gorillas -- an adult male, three adult females, and two young males -- watching from a distance.
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TRAVEL
August 21, 1988
Roderick Mann sets a dangerous example with his "rules are made to be broken" attitude ("I had not flown 10,000 miles in search of this extraordinary animal to look away. So I stared right back and hoped he would not charge.") His irresponsible behavior may encourage people to break other important rules like: Never breathe on a gorilla, and never visit when you're sick. Dr. Dian Fossey was deeply concerned about tourist impact on the critically endangered apes when she invited us to her research center in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- For the first time, a gorilla named Imani was allowed Monday to embrace her 12-day-old baby at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The as-yet-unnamed baby underwent surgery for a collapsed lung soon after birth and then was treated for pneumonia -- all at the park hospital. The mother, who is 18, which is old for a first-time gorilla mother, has been recovering from a Caesarean section. Imani sniffed the baby, picked her up and then carried her and cradled her in the gorillas' "bedroom area," zookeepers said.
TRAVEL
December 1, 1985
Arnie Weissmann's marvelous article on Rwanda's gorillas (Oct. 27) very well conveyed the excitement of seeing the gorillas in their high mountain forest. Although Weissmann had difficulty in obtaining information in the United States about seeing the gorillas, most travel agents should now have KLR International's Africa brochure, which contains descriptions of that and other safaris. We are operating 18 departures of these tours during 1986 and 1987. RALPH HAMMELBACHER vice president KLR International New York
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | Reuters
A British veterinarian and others who care for mountain gorillas in strife-torn Rwanda must abandon their posts, leaving the endangered animals to the mercy of poachers, an official at the Morris Animal Foundation said. "It's a potential tragedy for the rest of the world," Robert Hilsenroth, executive director of the foundation, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
A gorilla breakout at the San Diego Zoo ended tranquilly Monday, but not before a 400-pound silverback male had a 2 1/2-hour tour outside his enclosure, including a visit to a restaurant. Zoo officials said Memba traipsed out of his enclosure about 5:30 a.m. The gorilla exited through a steel door that employees failed to lock after they removed a beehive from the exhibit.
SCIENCE
September 22, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
One of the nastiest of the parasites that cause malaria may have originated in gorillas, scientists say after analyzing thousands of samples of primate feces. The findings may clear chimpanzees of much of the blame. Previous studies had suggested that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum , which infects humans, had evolved from a parasite that infected the common ancestor of humans and chimps before their lineages diverged 5 million to 7 million years ago. Another theory posited that humans had contracted the parasite from chimpanzees — as happened with HIV — possibly after hunting the primates for their meat.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
A team of doctors led by a veterinary surgeon operated on a 20-year-old female gorilla to repair a grapefruit-size hernia that could have been life threatening. A Denver Zoo spokesman said the 214-pound lowland gorilla, Bibi, was awake and hungry after the operation Wednesday.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
The 3-year-old boy who fell into a primate exhibit at a zoo just west of Chicago and was rescued by a gorilla was upgraded to fair condition. Doctors said they don't believe he will suffer any long-term effects. The boy had minor head injuries, broken bones in one hand and a number of scrapes and cuts, Dr. Wendy Marshall of Loyola Medical Center said. He also is alert despite being unconscious for 14 hours, Marshall said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Good news from the San Diego Zoo Safari Park: the 8-day-old gorilla that had been struggling with pneumonia is now stable and "showing great improvement," officials said. "She's developing normally and very rapidly," said Nadine Lamberski, associate director of veterinary services at the park. The baby, as yet unnamed, was born through a rare Caesarian section after its mother experienced distress during labor. Later, the baby underwent emergency surgery for a collapsed lung and was treated for pneumonia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Imani, who is 18 and had never given birth before, was in labor and in distress. The survival of the baby seemed to be in doubt. So a team of veterinarian staff from the San Diego Zoo Safari Park and (human) neonatal specialists from UC San Diego Medical Center decided to perform a Cesarean section -- a rare procedure for a gorilla. "In retrospect, the C-section was the right decision," said Nadine Lamberski, associate director of veterinary services at the park.
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Dian Fossey, a naturalist who chronicled her life among the gorillas of Rwanda in the book "Gorillas in the Mist," was honored Thursday with a Google Doodle.  Her work with what she called "the greatest of the great apes" helped to recast the 400-pound gorillas as gentle giants desperately in need of protection from poachers.  In the doodle you'll notice a close up of a gorilla's nose. Fossey used gorilla's individual "noseprints" to help identify them.  PHOTOS: Fascinating animal discoveries of 2013 Fossey was 6 feet tall, a San Francisco native and a chain smoker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
How to make Bruno Mars' delightfully naughty "Gorilla" a little naughtier? With help from R. Kelly and Pharrell. That's who Mars hit up for a just-released remix of the song, a raunchy highlight from the singer's great 2012 album, " Unorthodox Jukebox . " Posted Friday on Twitter (following a Q&A that Mars conducted there), the new version expands on the original's wildlife theme, with Kelly describing himself as "an anaconda in your garden" and Pharrell proposing some carefully chosen yoga positions.
SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
You might wonder what ingredient in a Mexican-made hair gel called Moco de Gorila - or Gorilla Snot - got its distributor in trouble with the law. It's probably not what you're thinking. It was the styling product's smog-forming compounds that prompted California air regulators to take action against Midway Importing Inc. The Houston-based company, which distributes health and beauty care products nationwide, paid $213,000 in fines for selling the line of hair gel in violation of consumer product regulations designed to protect air quality, the California Air Resources Board said Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
CANNES, France -- A trip to Le Marche, the film market at Cannes, is always a tonic experience. The energy created by the unabashed desire to make large sums of money is a refreshing change of pace after the more rarefied experiences of other parts of the festival. Le Marche is where you can see hijab-wearing women working for an Iranian production company next to a booth where Japanese horror producers are selling “Cult” (“from the producers of 'Ring' and 'The Grudge'”).
SCIENCE
October 11, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A team of 100 African scientists is counting rare mountain gorillas living in the range straddling Congo, Rwanda and Uganda -- the first such census in 14 years, the Uganda Wildlife Authority said. Scientists from the three nations began counting the endangered primates, made famous in the movie "Gorillas in the Mist," last month in an effort to pinpoint their exact number and determine what factors are affecting the population, the wildlife authority said in a statement.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two female gorillas have been photographed using sticks as tools to get through swampy areas, the first time the apes have been seen doing so in the wild, researchers reported this week in the online journal Public Library of Science Biology. The findings can help shed light on how humans came to use tools, and also broaden the understanding of how animals use them, the researchers said.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Gorillapods are flexible, multi-jointed camera tripods that can be bent around door handles, tree limbs and other objects. Now comes the Gorillapod Micro, a simpler, sleeker model that can remain attached to a camera all the time. The Micro has three zinc alloy legs that can grip uneven surfaces with their rubberized feet. The legs, though not multi-jointed, fan out from an aluminum positioning ball that allows 36 degrees of movement in any direction. The Micro screws into the tripod plate that's standard on most cameras.
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