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NEWS
December 10, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
After a complicated courtship, Koko the "talking gorilla" is finally getting a mate. The prospective partner, Ndume, is a gorilla from the Cincinnati Zoo. He will arrive at the 6.5-acre Gorilla Foundation in Woodside tonight. After 30 days in isolation as a health precaution, the two will be introduced. "It was a long struggle," said primatologist Penny Patterson, "but it looks like the beginning of what we hope will be a productive relationship."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | HEIDI ASPATURIAN, Aspaturian is a free-lance writer based in Pasadena.
It has become almost a truism in zoology that the more complicated an animal's lifestyle is in the wild, the less likely it is to be willing to do something simple, like reproduce, in captivity. This has certainly been the case with the gorilla, a species that shares about 98% of human DNA but, until recently, has shown remarkably little inclination to pass much of it along to offspring in zoos. However, that situation is changing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly 10 years of helping infertile women become pregnant, UC Irvine obstetrician Bill Yee has turned his talents to an unusual breed of patient--the female lowland gorilla. For the last two years, Yee has journeyed to zoos in Denver, Colorado Springs, Colo., and Oklahoma City to treat middle-aged gorillas with the high-tech fertility techniques he normally uses on women. So far, no pregnancies have resulted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Zoos have begun administering hormones to animals to try to improve the reproductive success rate. That effort already has resulted in a successful pregnancy for a 16-year-old gorilla at the Toledo, Ohio, Zoo and has produced unsuccessful pregnancies in three other females, researchers recently told a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to great escapes, few places can match the Los Angeles Zoo's gorilla compound for frequency. Gorillas have stood on each others' backs to scale exhibit walls and ripped metal doors off their hinges. One clambered over a wall and swatted a visitor's rear. Last summer, a gorilla jumped across a 12-foot moat. A few weeks later, another ran down one side of a moat and up the other and caught a vine someone had forgotten to trim, swinging to freedom. Zoo Director Manuel A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1997 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris, one of the oldest gorillas at the Los Angeles Zoo and a favorite among the park staff, was found dead Friday morning in his sleeping area. The popular 33-year-old primate died of congestive heart failure, zoo officials said. He appeared to have died in his sleep and was found in a fetal position by his handler. "The staff took it pretty hard," said zoo Director Manuel A. Mollinedo. "It cast a sad pall over the entire place." Chris lived a relatively long life, Mollinedo said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1991
Now I suppose we can look forward to the inevitable imitations: "Dances With Gorillas in the Mist," "Dances With Ninja Turtles," etc. EDWARD S. HILL Van Nuys
NATIONAL
January 18, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The oldest male gorilla in a North American zoo celebrated his 50th birthday surrounded by females and snacking on fruit. The Louisville Zoo in Kentucky held a party for Timmy, a silverback. Zoo officials say he is the oldest male and is tied for fourth-oldest gorilla overall in North America. They say it's rare for male gorillas to reach his age. Timmy and three female gorillas in his pack were given a 300-pound ice sculpture "cake" shaped like the number 50, with frozen fruit juices and other treats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000
The concept of making the Los Angeles Zoo a "world-class facility" goes against the evolution that is taking place in the conservation of species around the world ("Zoo Struggles With Problem of Gorillas in the Midst of Visitors," Dec. 18). The millions of dollars it will take to recreate simulated havens for captive animals would be far better spent in restoring their natural habitats. Zoos, born of the menageries of kings, should become sanctuaries for abused and discarded animals that cannot be returned to the wild.
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