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October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Bob Dylan's mercurial words on religion and spirituality have been examined for decades. Scholars, cultural critics and theologians have speculated with their pens, parsing the songwriter's syllables as if they were grains of sand. Entire books have focused on his spiritual explorations, beginning with his Jewish roots, his sometime embrace of evangelical Christianity and beyond. For all the words, though, few have argued its point more thoroughly - and with fewer academic buzzwords - than Brothers & Sisters, a choir of Los Angeles session singers who in 1969 gathered at Sound Recorders Studios in Hollywood under the direction of Lou Adler to record an album of the most uplifting and spiritually inclined works in Dylan's early canon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2003
There is nothing to support Richard Cromelin's labeling of Blind Willie Johnson as "a Texas blues singer with a spiritual bent" (" 'Blues' Out of Rhythm," Sept. 28). All of Johnson's recordings were powerful gospel performances, and the results of field research by numerous qualified scholars have never provided that he was a blues singer. He may have sung blues on occasion, but to say so is to speculate, such not being grounded in facts as we know them. He was, and remains, one of the greatest gospel artists of all time.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Michael McGough
In a dramatic show of support for immigration reform, some U.S. Roman Catholic bishops celebrated Mass Tuesday at the border fence in Nogales, Ariz. The ceremony produced some poignant imagery, including the bishops' distribution of Holy Communion through gaps in the fence's steel slats. In his homily , Cardinal Sean O'Malley of Boston invoked Jesus' parable of the Good Samaritan and the Epistle to the Hebrews. The author of that New Testament letter, he noted, “urges us to practice hospitality, for through it some have unknowingly entertained angels.” Without actually using that hackneyed catchphrase, O'Malley asked: What would Jesus do about immigrants who come to this country without permission?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
It's called "Sacrilege," but the new single from Yeah Yeah Yeahs feels full of the spirit. The first taste from a new album due in April, "Sacrilege" starts out as a lean, indie-rock jam, with singer Karen O cooing about "falling for a guy" and "feathers in our bed" over a restrained groove by guitarist Nick Zinner and Brian Chase. Before long, however, a full-blown gospel choir joins in, pushing "Sacrilege" outward (and upward) to much larger dimensions. "And I plead / And I pray," Karen O and the guest vocalists sing, and you can practically envision the crew holding forth at some too-cool tent revival.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
When Henry Rollins was a kid, his mother took him on countless trips across the globe. On one such journey to Greece, the KCRW-FM (89.9) radio personality and former Black Flag frontman remembered eating dinner next to a beautiful body of water when a group of hungry children swimming nearby looked up at the restaurant full of tourists. The travelers around him began laughing and throwing breadsticks at the children "like they were human seagulls. " He was so appalled by the tourists' actions that the vivid memory stayed with him forever.
MAGAZINE
January 24, 1993
The article reminded me of the old graduate school joke: "Want to find somebody who doesn't believe in God? Seek out a theologian." A. KENT GRAVETT Claremont
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The oldest surviving copy of the New Testament, a 4th century version that had its Gospels and epistles spread across the world, is being made whole again -- online. The British Library says the full text of the Codex Sinaiticus will be available to Web users by next July, digitally reconnecting parts that are held in Britain, Russia, Germany and a monastery in Egypt's Sinai Desert. A preview of the Codex, which also has some parts of the Old Testament, will hit the Web on Thursday -- the Book of Psalms and the Gospel of Mark.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
Should there be another commandment: "Thou shall not wear skin-bearing dresses when presenting religious awards?" That might be a consideration following Meagan Good's appearance at the BET Awards on Sunday, where she wore a low-cut, cleavage-revealing gown that left little to the imagination. Good, who starred in NBC's canceled "Deception" as an undercover detective, was on hand to present the gospel artist award, but many viewers felt her choice of wardrobe may have been a bit inappropriate, particularly since she was presenting the gospel award.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Perhaps the best way to describe "The Gospel According to the Other Mary" by John Adams is to borrow a phrase from the composer's frequent collaborator Peter Sellars, who wrote the libretto for the piece and is directing a newly staged production premiering Thursday at Walt Disney Concert Hall before traveling with the Los Angeles Philharmonic on its upcoming tour to Europe and New York. "It's not something you would see at the Crystal Cathedral," Sellars said during an interview following a recent rehearsal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014
The morning after firebrand singer Valerie June's swing through L.A. to open for Sharon Jones at the Wiltern on Tuesday, she had a whirlwind day of activities related to promoting her acclaimed 2013 album “Pushin' Against a Stone” before hopping a plane for her next stop: three nights with Jones at the venerable Fillmore auditorium in San Francisco. As engaging as “Pushin' Against a Stone” is, it didn't fully capture the charm and energy of her live performance, which doesn't surprise the 32-year-old Jackson, Tenn., native greatly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Art thief-turned-daredevil rider Crunch (Kurt Russell) - fresh from prison, having been burned by his weaselly partner-in-crime half-brother Nicky (Matt Dillon) - wants nothing more to do with heists. Yeah, right. "The Art of the Steal" is another Last Big Job concoction, albeit one in which writer-director Jonathan Sobol doubles down against staleness by stuffing his cast with appealing character actors who know their way around a profane quip (Terence Stamp, Jay Baruchel, Chris Diamantopoulos, Kenneth Welsh, Jason Jones)
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
When Henry Rollins was a kid, his mother took him on countless trips across the globe. On one such journey to Greece, the KCRW-FM (89.9) radio personality and former Black Flag frontman remembered eating dinner next to a beautiful body of water when a group of hungry children swimming nearby looked up at the restaurant full of tourists. The travelers around him began laughing and throwing breadsticks at the children "like they were human seagulls. " He was so appalled by the tourists' actions that the vivid memory stayed with him forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Within the space of two years, Rosanne Cash lost her mother (Vivian Liberto), her father (Johnny Cash) and stepmother (June Carter), deaths she wrestled with on her two previous albums: 2009's "The List" and 2006's "Black Cadillac. " She takes the longer view in "The River & the Thread," her sterling new album informed by her nearly 10 years as an adult orphan in the world. In deeply personal and insightful songs, Cash assesses who she is and where she came from as well as what has been bequeathed to her by her parents and by geography on the road to figuring out what truly is her own. The album's title stems from a line in the opening track, "A Feather's Not a Bird," in which she evenhandedly recognizes the forces that shape a person, with the understanding that it's up to each person how those elements direct their lives.
SPORTS
January 5, 2014 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
In December 2006, Bobby Bowden blew off an interview with a Los Angeles reporter who was in Tallahassee, Fla., to preview Florida State's upcoming Emerald Bowl game with UCLA. The reporter was me. Bowden had no time to explain as he rushed out of Doak Campbell Stadium on his way to a waiting plane. He said he'd give me all the time I wanted if I could stay an extra day (and he graciously did), but this was a pressing issue concerning the future of the program. Neither of us could have imagined that trip would lead to Florida State playing Auburn on Monday night in the last Bowl Championship Series title game.
WORLD
November 26, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME - Eight months into his headline-grabbing papacy, Pope Francis issued a wide-ranging manifesto Tuesday in which he sharply criticizes the excesses of capitalism and says he wants a decentralized Roman Catholic Church that is "bruised, hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets. " Francis' 84-page Apostolic Exhortation, titled "The Joy of the Gospel," gathers together a number of the causes he has championed in speeches and homilies since being elected in March, including the need for "a conversion of the papacy," to reverse the "excessive centralization.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Bob Dylan's mercurial words on religion and spirituality have been examined for decades. Scholars, cultural critics and theologians have speculated with their pens, parsing the songwriter's syllables as if they were grains of sand. Entire books have focused on his spiritual explorations, beginning with his Jewish roots, his sometime embrace of evangelical Christianity and beyond. For all the words, though, few have argued its point more thoroughly - and with fewer academic buzzwords - than Brothers & Sisters, a choir of Los Angeles session singers who in 1969 gathered at Sound Recorders Studios in Hollywood under the direction of Lou Adler to record an album of the most uplifting and spiritually inclined works in Dylan's early canon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Many of John Adams' scores pursue the big ideas. His subjects have included the U.S. relationship with China, Middle Eastern terrorism, the L.A. earthquake and riots, caring for the dying, the Nativity, the bomb. On Thursday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall, he tackled perhaps the biggest of all when the Los Angeles Philharmonic premiered Adams' "The Gospel According to the Other Mary. " Taking on the most monumental narrative in Western civilization, Adams' part-opera/part-Passion is - in subject, meaning, emotion, relevance, historical resonance and musical ambition - huge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By David Colker
Jazz singer Gloria Lynne, whose roller-coaster career took her from hits like "I Wish You Love" in the 1960s to near-obscurity and then rediscovery, died on Oct. 8 in a Newark, N.J., hospital. She was 83. The cause of death was a heart attack, said her son Richard Alleyne, a rock arranger known professionally as P.J. Allen. Lynne was lauded for her interpretations of songs in a wide variety of styles, and "I Wish You Love," her best-known recording, scored high on the charts in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The title of Tye Tribbett's new album, "Greater Than," leaves two words implied at the beginning ("He is") and one at the end ("anything"). A choir director and bible-study leader living near Philadelphia, Tribbett is one of gospel music's ascendant young stars, and the title track here catalogs some of the ways in which the Lord improves upon his rivals: He performs miracles, for instance, and takes disease from the body. Yet "Greater Than" also goes some way toward describing Tribbett's creative approach on a record that vastly expands the sonic idea of modern gospel.
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