Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGospel
IN THE NEWS

Gospel

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2008 | Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writer
Theresa Fajardo had a moment of fright Friday afternoon as she waited to sing her solo in front of a nearly full house at Walt Disney Concert Hall. But as the gospel-style Christian anthem "Let Everything That Hath Breath" simmered to the drum beat, Fajardo, 18, felt at peace. Mid-song, the Agoura High School senior fell out of line to stand apart from the other singers -- one of about 900 from 28 Southern California schools gathered for the 19th annual High School Choir Festival.
Advertisement
OPINION
April 23, 1995
On behalf of everyone of Jewish descent, I wish to thank Larry Stammer for his outstanding article "Good Friday Renews Focus on Roots of Anti-Semitism" (April 14), and to The Times for publishing this expose of the origins of prejudice and hatred on the front page where it belongs to be every year. Unknown to many Christians and certainly to all anti-Semites, the Gospel of John was written 100 to 150 years after the death of Jesus. This was a time when the primarily Jewish leaders of the fledgling Christian religion decided to devote their major efforts to converting the all-powerful Roman Empire to Christianity, rather than continuing their relatively unsuccessful efforts at converting all Jews (Jews accounted for almost 10% of the population of the Roman Empire at that time)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1986 | PAUL GREIN
Michael W. Smith's music is based on the idea that Christian kids like to rock too. Smith's show Saturday at the Greek Theatre featured the usual rock show trappings--fog, strobe lights, power chords--but his songs also conveyed religious messages. In fact, Smith was so conscious of appearing hip and contemporary that he and his five-man band didn't really connect until a third of the way through the set.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Margaret Gray
Could tap-dancing possibly be as fun as Rachel York makes it look?  She and the cast of the Roundabout Theatre Company's Tony-winning Broadway revival of “Anything Goes,” now stopping at the Ahmanson Theatre on its national tour, perform the show's exuberant title number with such saucy, effortless flair and megawatt smiles that I found myself thinking, “I'm signing up for lessons” - I, who get winded riding an escalator in heels. A brief respite from reality - whether a restrictive society or bunions - is both the theme and the promise of Cole Porter's madcap shipboard 1934 musical, which introduced many of his most famous songs (“You're the Top,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “It's De-lovely” and of course, “Anything Goes”)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anticipation ran high on Saturday among the nearly full house at the Greek Theatre for what was billed as Little Richard's first L.A.appearance in 20 years. Would his voice be weak from constant rounds of self-promotion? Would he be back in one of his recurring gospel-only phases? Would the show be a stunning comeback for one of rock's most influential and commanding figures or a big wop-lop-a-loo-bop-a-wop-bam-fizz ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It did not move him to shout, "Good golly, Miss Molly." "Awop bop a-loo bop, awop bam boom" did not screech from his lips. He did not appear to shake a whole lot. That all came later. Instead, getting the first look at his wax likeness at the Movieland Wax Museum Thursday, Little Richard, 64, was plainly honest. "It makes you look like [you] died when you look at this thing," he said with a chuckle, posing for news cameras as Dick Clark mopped Richard's sweaty brow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
**** VARIOUS ARTISTS "The Roots of Rap" Yazoo Don't expect to find the dynamic production touches of Dr. Dre on this 70-minute survey of blues-related recordings from the 1920s and 1930s. But you will find enough humor, commentary and rhyme in most of these 23 tracks to justify the album's title and concept.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
It was one nation under a groove at Barack Obama's victory celebration Tuesday night in Chicago. Classic soul, R&B, funk, disco and Motown provided the soundtrack for the president's post-reelection bash, as throngs of Democratic Party faithful swayed to Al Green's "Let's Stay Together," Bill Withers' "Lovely Day," Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give It Up," Michael Jackson's "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'," McFadden & Whitehead's "Ain't No Stoppin' Us...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|