Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGotcha Sportswear Inc
IN THE NEWS

Gotcha Sportswear Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Tee Time: Baggy swimming trunks and neon colors may come and go, but the printed T-shirt endures as a stable of the California surf wear scene. Rather than find a licensee for its printed T's, Gotcha Sportswear in Irvine kept the operation in-house by creating New Age Graphics, a division that can produce 30,000 impressions on T-shirts daily. "By combining screen printing, embroidery and other sophisticated treatments, Gotcha has taken T-shirts to the next level. . . .
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 12, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Broadband Interactive Group, a new-media company that is using cutting-edge technology to lasso the extreme-sports set, said Monday it will begin producing one-hour television shows Monday through Friday in January on Fox Sports Net. Gotcha.tv will be broadcast into 68 million homes, targeting viewers between the ages of 10 and 34 who are interested in sports such as surfing, skateboarding and snowboarding.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 31, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Jebbia's trendy Union clothing store in New York's SoHo district made its name in the '80s by selling fashions imported from England. But in 1991, Jebbia added more apparel from the colonies after customers began clamoring for surf wear made by Stussy Inc. in Irvine. "I saw tons of potential for Stussy in New York, but Union just wasn't big enough" to display it, Jebbia said.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Jebbia's trendy Union clothing store in New York's SoHo district made its name in the '80s by selling fashions imported from England. But in 1991, Jebbia added more apparel from the colonies after customers began clamoring for surf wear made by Stussy Inc. in Irvine. "I saw tons of potential for Stussy in New York, but Union just wasn't big enough" to display it, Jebbia said.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
It may say June, 1989, on the calendar, but it is the spring of 1990 at C&C Inc. in Fountain Valley. The 6-year-old company, owned by former childhood playmates Donald A. (Dac) Clark and Paul Carr, designs, produces and distributes surf and sportswear for one of the industry's hottest labels, Gotcha, as well as for two newcomers. In the surf-wear business, as in most of the clothing trade, work is always being done a year or more in advance. Now is the time that C&C's designers begin firming up their concepts for next year's looks.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Broadband Interactive Group, a new-media company that is using cutting-edge technology to lasso the extreme-sports set, said Monday it will begin producing one-hour television shows Monday through Friday in January on Fox Sports Net. Gotcha.tv will be broadcast into 68 million homes, targeting viewers between the ages of 10 and 34 who are interested in sports such as surfing, skateboarding and snowboarding.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top executive of Gotcha Sportswear Inc. has been selected as the new president of rival Quiksilver Inc., one of the largest surf-wear design companies in Orange County. Shaheen Sadeghi, 37, will fill a position at Quiksilver that was left vacant when Robert B. McKnight moved from president to chairman earlier this month. The management shifts began when John C. Warner departed as chairman to become a consultant concentrating on Quiksilver's European division.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of surf apparel maker Quiksilver Inc., Shaheen Sadeghi, resigned Monday to spend more time with his family and to start his own business ventures. Sadeghi's departure, coming a year after he joined Quiksilver from rival Gotcha Sportswear Inc. in Irvine, followed the layoffs last week of five middle and senior managers at the Costa Mesa company. Quiksilver Chairman Robert B. McKnight Jr.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Doug Bunting stopped stocking wet suits in his Equipe surf shop, it was viewed by purists as the moral equivalent of banishing hot dogs from a baseball stadium. Bunting didn't stop there. He relegated his surfboards to an out-of-the-way corner and refitted his store to downplay its surfing roots. The music wafting through his Laguna Beach emporium was changed from contemporary rock to a more ethnic mix of rap and hip-hop.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Doug Bunting stopped stocking wet suits in his Equipe surf shop, it was viewed by purists as the moral equivalent of banishing hot dogs from a baseball stadium. Bunting didn't stop there. He relegated his surfboards to an out-of-the-way corner and refitted his store to downplay its surfing roots. The music wafting through his Laguna Beach emporium was changed from contemporary rock to a more ethnic mix of rap and hip-hop.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | Chris Woodyard, Times staff writer
Tee Time: Baggy swimming trunks and neon colors may come and go, but the printed T-shirt endures as a stable of the California surf wear scene. Rather than find a licensee for its printed T's, Gotcha Sportswear in Irvine kept the operation in-house by creating New Age Graphics, a division that can produce 30,000 impressions on T-shirts daily. "By combining screen printing, embroidery and other sophisticated treatments, Gotcha has taken T-shirts to the next level. . . .
BUSINESS
June 9, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
It may say June, 1989, on the calendar, but it is the spring of 1990 at C&C Inc. in Fountain Valley. The 6-year-old company, owned by former childhood playmates Donald A. (Dac) Clark and Paul Carr, designs, produces and distributes surf and sportswear for one of the industry's hottest labels, Gotcha, as well as for two newcomers. In the surf-wear business, as in most of the clothing trade, work is always being done a year or more in advance. Now is the time that C&C's designers begin firming up their concepts for next year's looks.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ronald Blake Drummond, now 83, paddled out at Doheny in the 1930s, he was one of the first to surf the break in southern Orange County. His 100-pound redwood board was shaped in a garage. His swim trunks were homemade. No one else was there. Surfers were so scarce in those days, they would stop to talk if they spotted each other's cars on coastal roads. It didn't matter whether they knew each other, but chances were they did.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|