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Gourmet Magazine

January 14, 2001 | LESLEE KOMAIKO
In 1950, Norma Laine's aunt bought her a copy of Gourmet magazine. Not long after that, Laine, co-owner of Cha Cha Cha Encino, says, "I remember my parents coming to dinner, and I made a cheesecake [recipe] out of that magazine--the original New York cheesecake. It was a big hit." Inspired by that success, Laine subscribed. By the late 1950s, "I decided I'd like to have all of them [Gourmet magazines] from the very beginning, January 1941."
September 23, 1998 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
Cookbook lovers have a wealth of bookstores that cater to their every interest. Wine buffs aren't quite that lucky. It's rare to find a bookstore that stocks a comprehensive selection of wine books for someone seriously interested in wine. That's why Kellgren's Wine Book Catalog is so welcome. A short browse turns up a number of books I'd like to have in my own library. For sheer good writing on wine: "Passions: The Wines and Travels of Thomas Jefferson" by James M.
May 1, 1997 | Marla Dickerson
Speaking of upscale digs, Orange County's newest luxury lodging comes with a transmission. Newport Dunes Resort, dubbed the "Ritz of RV Parks," is now renting luxury motor homes to overnight guests at the 110-acre Newport Beach resort. Geared toward the motor-homeless, the new program allows easy riders to experience all the comforts of a first-class hotel on wheels without having to learn to parallel park, according to Newport Dunes spokeswoman Laurie Kajiwara.
August 12, 2009
Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 8 biscuits. Note: Adapted from Gourmet magazine, June 1993 2 cups flour, plus extra for kneading 2 teaspoons double-acting baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup cold vegetable shortening 3/4 cup buttermilk Milk for brushing the biscuits 1. Heat the oven to 425 degrees. Into a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, and blend in the cold shortening until the mixture resembles meal.
March 6, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
There are a lot of smart people in the food world, but not many smarter than Ruth Reichl. So when she says formal fine dining is going to make a comeback, maybe it's a good idea to pay attention. Reichl was the restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times in the 1980s and '90s, then restaurant critic for the New York Times, editor of Gourmet magazine and author of a series of best-selling food memoirs. I was talking to her for a story I'm working on when she pointed out that "the people who really spend a lot of money in restaurants now are the 20-30somethings and they really think of restaurants as an important part of their lives.
June 2, 1999
1. "How To Cook Everything" by Mark Bittman (MacMillan, $25). A fresh approach to the cooking encyclopedia with more than 1,500 recipes. Last Week: 4 Weeks on List: 36 2. "Martha Stewart's Hors D'Oeuvres Handbook" by Martha Stewart (Clarkson Potter, $35). A contemporary spin to party finger foods. Last Week: 2 Weeks on List: 8 3. "A Spoonful of Ginger" by Nina Simonds (Alfred Knopf, $30). Healing recipes from China. Last Week: Weeks on List: 5 4.
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