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WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - After years of building massive and lavish new government office buildings - including ones inspired by the White House, Versailles and the U.S. Capitol - China is saying enough is enough. Central authorities have issued a five-year moratorium on the construction of new government offices, training centers and hotels, the latest step in a frugality drive that also includes cutbacks on banquets, travel and other perks for bureaucrats. According to the State Council, China's cabinet, the new policy issued late Tuesday is important for “building a clean government and … maintaining the image of the Communist Party.
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WORLD
April 25, 2014 | Kathleen Hennessey, Christi Parsons
The White House said Saturday that the world's leading industrialized nations had agreed to impose targeted sanctions on Russia as early as Monday in response to its actions toward neighboring Ukraine. "Leaders have agreed that there must be further sanctions on Russia for their actions," a senior Obama administration official said. "Each country will determine which targeted sanctions they will impose. These sanctions will be coordinated and complementary, but not necessarily identical.
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WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- Gunmen early Thursday captured the parliament and Cabinet buildings in Simferopol, the capital of Ukraine's autonomous republic of Crimea, an official said. Ukraine lawmaker and Crimea native Andrei Semchenko told The Times that two units of gunmen struck about 5:30 a.m. He described the men as wearing camouflage clothing and "armed to the teeth, including heavy machine guns. " “They used a couple of stun grenades to break in and pushed the police guards stationed inside out into the street," Semchenko said.
WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Separatist gunmen occupying the volatile eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk detained a 13-member team of military analysts from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe Friday in defiance of international agreements signed by Russia and Ukraine. The German-led OSCE team was on a mission to evaluate a potential security threat and operating under a treaty provision known as the Vienna Document, which obliges the OSCE's 57 member states to "consult and cooperate in case of unusual military activity or increasing tensions.
WORLD
June 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Nearly 1,000 people looted government warehouses in East Timor's capital, Dili, loading trucks with computers, office chairs, car parts and even musical instruments. Many of the looters had been waiting for rice handouts and became angry after realizing a warehouse containing the food relief had been emptied. At least 28 people have died and more than 100 have been wounded in violence sparked by the dismissal of 600 soldiers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Opponents of the controversial sale of two dozen state government buildings won a significant victory Tuesday, when the state Supreme Court declined to hear a last-minute plea by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to approve the deal. The decision does not officially kill the sale; a state appeals court has scheduled a hearing on the case next month. But the Supreme Court's decision ensures that final approval must be made by Gov.-elect Jerry Brown, not Schwarzenegger, who has been the transaction's biggest booster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2010 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
A San Francisco judge refused Friday to halt the controversial sale of two dozen government buildings, clearing the way for what the Schwarzenegger administration describes as a much-needed infusion of revenue to shore up the ailing state budget. Superior Court Judge Charlotte Woolard ruled that the two men who opposed the sell-off ? which they described as a waste of taxpayer money ? have no standing to sue the state to stop the transaction. Outside Woolard's courtroom, a spokesman for the Department of General Services, which is conducting the $2.3-billion sale, said the state is "very satisfied with the judge's ruling" and would work to close escrow as planned on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 16, 1990
Guards surrounded government buildings in the secessionist republic of Estonia today after Soviet loyalists converged on Parliament in what the prime minister called a failed "coup attempt." Lawmakers in neighboring Lithuania began a closed-door debate on new proposals designed to end an impasse with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Calm was reported in all three Baltic republics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2005 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Orange County officials have come up with an unusual plan to get cheap electricity for the offices at the Santa Ana Civic Center -- make it themselves and save the county government $4 million to $5 million a year. The project would serve the county Hall of Administration, the Superior Court, the federal office building and other government buildings. County supervisors are scheduled to vote on a financing plan for the project today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reinforced concrete barriers will be placed around Ventura County Jail, shatterproof office windows will be installed at the Government Center and the Sheriff's Department will double its intelligence-gathering staff to help guard against terrorist attacks. Ventura County Sheriff Bob Brooks outlined these added security measures in a presentation Tuesday to the Board of Supervisors.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
HORLIVKA, Ukraine - Yelena Rybak sat quietly next to her husband for an hour under their carport, alone and for the last time. She touched his battered face and stroked his cold hands, as if the warmth of her fingers might still wake him. Then it was time for the young, bearded priest, who arrived with several dozen relatives, friends and sympathizers. They escorted Yelena and 42-year-old Volodymyr from the gray-brick house through a wooden fence and onto a narrow street of buckling pavement.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Wednesday accused the United States of orchestrating the Ukraine crisis for geopolitical gain and warned that Russia will "certainly respond" if its interests in Ukraine are attacked. In an interview with state-run Russia Today television, Lavrov linked Vice President Joe Biden's visit to Kiev on Tuesday to the Ukrainian government's resumption of efforts to oust pro-Russia gunmen holding police stations and government buildings in a dozen towns and cities in eastern Ukraine.
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- Separatist gunmen in eastern Ukraine on Friday defied calls by world powers for them to surrender their arms and leave the government buildings they have seized in support of demands of independence from Kiev. Top diplomats from Russia, the United States, the European Union and Ukraine agreed Thursday in Geneva on a series of steps to "deescalate" the Ukraine crisis, in which armed groups of Russian-speaking men have occupied key government installations in a dozen cities.
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - Ukrainian police sympathetic to pro-Russia separatists occupying government buildings helped thwart a threatened crackdown Monday, undermining the government's credibility and encouraging the gunmen to grab more facilities. Ukraine's Interior Ministry said in a statement that it planned to replace 12,000 officers in the besieged east, blaming disloyal police for the failure of what it termed an anti-terrorism operation. Acting President Oleksandr Turchynov had issued an ultimatum Sunday to gunmen holding government facilities in Donetsk, Luhansk, Slavyansk, Kramatorsk and other cities, telling them to lay down their arms by early Monday.
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- A threatened sweep by Ukrainian armed forces to oust pro-Russia gunmen occupying government buildings in eastern Ukraine failed to materialize after local police in the besieged venues apparently refused to take part in the proclaimed "anti-terrorist operation. " Ukraine's acting president, Oleksandr Turchynov, had issued an ultimatum on Sunday that gunmen holding key government facilities in Donetsk, Luhansk, Slavyansk, Kramatorsk and other cities in the volatile eastern and southern areas of Ukraine lay down their arms Monday or face ouster at gunpoint by Ukrainian troops and police.
WORLD
April 13, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected and updated. See below for details.
MOSCOW -- Vowing that the Russian takeover of Crimea would not be repeated elsewhere in the east of his country, Ukraine's interim president gave separatists until Monday to lay down their arms and surrender government buildings they have seized or face a crackdown by military forces. Those separatists who don't fire on security forces and surrender their weapons will not be prosecuted, President Oleksandr Turchynov promised Sunday. “The Council of National Security and Defense has decided to carry out a large-scale anti-terrorist operation with the use of armed forces of Ukraine,” Turchynov said in a televised address to the nation Sunday afternoon.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2006 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
VISITORS to the Tanggu district administrative offices are greeted by common watchwords plastered inside some public buildings: honesty, transparency, efficiency. Once they pass through security, though, they're often surprised to find government officials working out in the gym, splashing in the Olympic-size swimming pool, playing cards in the game parlor, shooting pool or getting facials at the salon. "When I first went into the government building, I thought I entered the wrong gate.
WORLD
September 18, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Zaid al-Aalayaa, Los Angeles Times
Security forces opened fire Sunday on tens of thousands of demonstrators in Yemen's capital, Sana, killing at least 26 protesters in one of the bloodiest days of the 9-month-old rebellion against President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Violence broke out when protesters marched from Sana University toward heavily guarded government buildings. Most demonstrators were peaceful, although some hurled stones and Molotov cocktails after snipers shot from rooftops and troops loyal to Saleh opened fire with high-caliber weapons.
WORLD
April 12, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
MOSCOW - Gunmen wearing camouflage uniforms seized two administrative buildings Saturday in a town in eastern Ukraine and separatists attacked sites in two other towns, drawing the vow of a tough response from a top Ukrainian official who blamed the violence on Russian “aggression.” The assailants, armed with automatic rifles, seized a police station and Security Service office in Slavyansk, in the eastern Donetsk region. They captured at least 20 submachine guns and 400 handguns in the station's armory and began distributing the weapons to dozens of separatists, the UNIAN news agency reported.
WORLD
April 9, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams and Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- As armed standoffs persisted in eastern Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin tightened the economic screws on his impoverished neighbor Wednesday by warning that Ukraine may have to pay in advance for its gas imports from Russia. The predominantly state-held Gazprom energy behemoth last week raised prices for Ukrainian purchases of its natural gas by 80%, canceling a discount that had been extended to Kremlin-allied former President Viktor Yanukovich last year. Russian lawmakers also voted last week to revoke another discount on gas exports to Ukraine that had been in place as part of a lease agreement between the two former Soviet republics that gave Moscow control over the Sevastopol naval base until 2042.
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