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Government Deregulation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a summer of delays, California regulators and legislators are aiming in one final week to resolve issues crucial to millions of electricity customers and the financial stability of the state and its utilities. The energy crisis that caused blackouts early this year has receded, but it has left behind a potential fiscal crisis. The state needs to recoup more than $8 billion that it has spent on power, and it has signed $43 billion in long-term electricity contracts.
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NEWS
September 10, 2001 | DOUG SMITH and RICH CONNELL and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
During the peak of California's power crisis, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power earned far greater profits selling electricity to the rest of the state than agency officials have previously acknowledged, according to a newly completed independent audit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's newly created public power authority on Friday took the first steps toward creating one of the nation's largest public efforts at generating electricity using energy from the sun, wind and other renewable resources. The California Consumer Power and Conservation Financing Authority voted to give its chairman, S. David Freeman, permission to negotiate contracts with renewable energy providers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Gray Davis expressed optimism Friday that a $2.9-billion plan to try to restore Southern California Edison to financial health will reach his desk before next Friday, when legislators adjourn for the year. A day after the state Assembly narrowly approved the measure, the Democratic governor said that although it still needs to be reconciled with a slightly different version approved earlier by the Senate, he is confident the bill will clear the Legislature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite threats of a ballot backlash, the state Assembly late Thursday approved a $2.9-billion bill to restore Southern California Edison to something close to financial health. Passage by a 41-32 vote, almost along party lines, came only after the Legislature's Democratic leaders arranged for Democratic Assemblyman Gil Cedillo, who had been home in Los Angeles with his ailing wife, to fly to Sacramento for a late evening vote.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2001 | MARGOT HABIBY, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Shell Energy Services, an affiliate of Royal Dutch/Shell Group, the second-largest publicly traded oil company, said Tuesday that it will stop selling retail power in Ohio and Texas because of a slowdown in U.S. deregulation. Shell Energy will focus instead on selling natural gas in Georgia and Ohio, the company said.
NEWS
September 4, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faulted early on for responding sluggishly to the energy crisis, Gov. Gray Davis has reversed course in dramatic fashion, wielding his executive powers in a way critics now say edges toward imperiousness. In recent months, Davis has used his constitutional authority to issue a sweeping series of executive orders: He authorized the state to borrow $5 billion for energy purchases, weakened air pollution standards for power plants and bypassed some of government's normal checks and balances.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A bill to rescue Edison International's utility from bankruptcy is set to be considered Tuesday by a California Assembly fiscal committee, which postponed its review of the plan late last week. The Assembly Appropriations Committee adjourned for the three-day weekend without voting on the bill because of confusion over 11 amendments being considered. The committee members didn't receive analysis of some amendments before the start of the hearing.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As state lawmakers enter what looks to be the final round of debate on a rescue plan for insolvent Southern California Edison Co., consumer advocates and even some business groups are asking whether the utility's 4.3 million customers might be better off if SCE filed for bankruptcy. Support for a legislative deal for SCE, which is backed by Gov.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judy Gertner was ecstatic over the all-electric Costa Mesa home she bought in 1979, with its extra-large electric water heater, electric appliances and electric radiant-heat system that gently warmed rooms according to individual thermostats. She was shocked, however, when her monthly electric bill rose to $200 in July.
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