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WORLD
March 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexican police arrested 42 current and former government employees in connection with a large migrant-trafficking ring, officials announced. The suspects were from 12 of Mexico's 31 states, and the network allegedly smuggled Cubans, Uruguayans, Brazilians, Central Americans and Asians into the United States. Those arrested included agents and ex-agents of the National Immigration Institute, the agency Mexico relies on to ferret out illegal migrants.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
A 14-year-old student has published a study detailing how the U.S. federal and state governments could collectively save about $234 million a year by simply switching the type of font that is used on printed documents. In his study, Suvir Mirchandani, who lives in the Pittsburgh area, said he found that Garamond is the most efficient font for printing, among the fonts recommend for use by the General Services Administration. This is because Garamond uses thinner strokes for its letters, meaning less ink is used on each character.
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WORLD
September 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
SOUTH AFRICA An estimated 800,000 government workers demanding higher pay and more benefits walked off the job in what union leaders called the biggest strike in South African history. Police officers, prison guards, nurses and other government workers deemed essential were prohibited from striking. Tens of thousands of workers marched peacefully in several cities to press their demands for a 7% raise, medical insurance and a housing allowance.
OPINION
January 25, 2014
Re "The GOP discovers inequality," Opinion, Jan. 22 The usually insightful Doyle McManus describes how Republicans have begun to shift their message, if not their actual practices, toward acknowledgment of the bitter harvest of inequality. At the same time, he writes, the GOP is hardly ready to become the party of "big government. " Excuse me, but in the states and in Congress, the GOP has advocated for sticking government's fingers into women's bodies and into everybody's bedroom.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They made it through the holidays all right, annoyed that the second government shutdown in two months had put a dent in Christmas but hanging on to the near-certainty that all of this would end with the new year. Then the new year came and it did not end. For hundreds of thousands of federal workers, Jan. 1 was not the usual joyful renaissance of resolutions and fresh starts.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, Bob Clark, a customs inspector on the U.S.-Mexico border at San Ysidro, Calif., is genuinely nervous. Clark knows that each fall, when budget negotiations between the White House and Congress bog down, the government threatens to lay off thousands of federal employees as a way of living within its means. Most of the workers usually take those threats with a grain of salt, because the layoffs almost never occur; the last were in 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2004 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Mirroring trends nationwide, healthcare costs for Ventura County government workers will increase up to 18% in 2005, the fifth consecutive year the county has seen double-digit increases in health premiums, according to a new report and county officials. "This is a national problem -- trying to deal with the rising costs of healthcare," said Barry Zimmerman, a benefits manager in the Human Resources Division.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government employees accused their bosses in the Western office of the Resolution Trust Corp. of lying to Congress, abusing their positions and wasting as much as $500 million in taxpayer funds trying to clean up failed California thrifts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2004 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
A proposal to dramatically increase pensions paid to Orange County government workers is meeting resistance from some younger workers who say they don't want to pay for the increased benefits. At issue is a portion of a proposed three-year labor contract that would allow some veteran employees to retire next year with significantly higher pensions at the expense of younger workers, who will pick up the increased costs through larger contributions to the county pension system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County employees arriving at work in twos and threes at the Government Center and 140 other county offices will be tallied next week as the county takes its semi-annual survey to learn how many share rides to their jobs. The survey is intended to determine whether the county government is meeting its goals for reducing air pollution by cutting down on the number of people who drive alone to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Jack Dolan and Ben Poston, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James Chalfant stared in disbelief Tuesday at a list of hundreds of Department of Water and Power employees who have asked that their names and salaries be withheld from the public, citing safety concerns. On the list were mechanics, typists and meter readers. "This is frivolous on its face; I mean, these are DWP employees," Chalfant said, noting that the names of government employees are public and even undercover police officers have a hard time demonstrating they would be in danger if their names appeared on a list of department employees.
WORLD
December 2, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
KIEV, Ukraine -- Protesters blocked access to the government's headquarters in central Kiev on Monday and declared a general strike as Ukraine's most serious political crisis since the Orange Revolution of 2005 reached the country's far-flung regions and towns. Hundreds of opposition activists surrounded the Council of Ministers building, parking several lines of cars in strategic spots around it and blocking doors and gates with lines of people waving blue-and-yellow national flags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
A Wells Fargo & Co. pension expert testified Thursday in the Bell corruption trial that he drew up a special retirement plan for city administrators Robert Rizzo and Angela Spaccia that would have allowed them to increase their already huge pensions by at least $375,000 a year. Alan Pennington, an actuary in Nashville, Tenn., testified that his projections showed that the plan would have paid Rizzo $7.5 million over his lifetime, and Spaccia, who is younger, $8 million. The plan was to set it up so that the percentage used to calculate Spaccia's benefits was twice that used for Rizzo.
OPINION
October 15, 2013
Re "Snow ravages cattle industry," Oct. 12 My heart goes out to the ranchers in South Dakota whose cattle were killed in a blizzard. According to the article, many people in that part of the state supported the government shutdown. Ranchers, call your representatives in Washington and tell them to reopen the government so you and all the other people who are not getting services can get the help and support you deserve. Also, our government employees, contractors and subcontractors need to get back to work too. Judith Fenton Costa Mesa The South Dakota cattle ranchers portrayed in this article are represented by a Republican in the House of Representatives.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Less than a week into the federal government shutdown, the economic effects are starting to be felt beyond the nation's capital. Layoffs are beginning in the private sector. More investors are unloading Treasury notes. And beneath the surface of the apparent calm in financial markets, banks and corporate chief financial officers are quietly taking steps to prepare for what many see as a potentially disastrous scenario if lawmakers fail to raise the debt limit by the Oct. 17 deadline.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
The president's Affordable Care Act may be unpopular, and Americans may be wary about raising the debt ceiling - but shut down the federal government? Polls show that Americans don't want that to happen, and our readers' opinions reflect that. As the government appears headed for a shutdown on midnight Tuesday - with Congress deadlocked on a spending bill that would keep federal agencies running but delay the implementation of Presidential Obama's healthcare reform law for one year - most readers are expressing disbelief at the dysfunction in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2002 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gathered over financial statements and chocolate-covered strawberries at a Dana Point resort, trustees of Orange County's employee retirement system heard the bad news. Like many ordinary Americans' 401(k) plans, the county pension fund is losing money for the third straight year, thanks to debilitating stock market declines. The fund, which has fallen to about $4.3 billion from $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County government's largest labor union approved a tentative contract Friday, potentially ending its most acrimonious salary battle in a decade. Under the agreement, 4,200 general government workers would receive wage hikes averaging 13% over a four-year period. If the contract is quickly ratified, employees will see the pay raise beginning in their Oct. 18 checks, union leaders said.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration told union leaders Thursday morning that federal employees will know by the end of the week whether they can report to work Tuesday if the government shuts down. Supervisors will tell employees informally by the end of the day Friday if they can expect to be furloughed, the president of the National Treasury Employees Union said in a statement. They would receive an official notice on Tuesday if a continuing resolution to fund the government is not passed in Congress and signed into law by then.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Michael McGough
In attacking the Internal Revenue Service for a training video parodying the TV show “Star Trek,” critics have not very boldly gone where many have gone before -- to a political universe in which government employees are pilloried for practices that are common in the private sector. You probably have heard that the IRS spent $60,000 to produce a video parodying the 1960s space opera, which spawned several spinoffs in movies and on TV. The video features the adventures of the "Starship Enterprise Y,” whose mission is to “seek out new tax forms, to explore strange new regulations, to boldly go where no governmental employee has gone before.” The stand-in for Capt.
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