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Government Employees Layoffs

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NEWS
September 4, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, Bob Clark, a customs inspector on the U.S.-Mexico border at San Ysidro, Calif., is genuinely nervous. Clark knows that each fall, when budget negotiations between the White House and Congress bog down, the government threatens to lay off thousands of federal employees as a way of living within its means. Most of the workers usually take those threats with a grain of salt, because the layoffs almost never occur; the last were in 1982.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have taken a solid 10. Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon had been trying to muster 10 council votes in an effort to cancel a contract that will provide $3 million for outside public relations work for the DWP. Alarcon and Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg had objected to the contract, saying that the timing was bad because the DWP is amid layoffs and voluntary buyouts. But a last-minute agreement Tuesday afternoon between the DWP and the Architects and Engineers Assn.
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NEWS
August 30, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California counties, already limping along on bare-bones budgets weakened by a recessionary economy, are preparing to slash such essential services as police and criminal prosecutions to an extent not seen since Proposition 13 was passed in 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why do City Council members Richard Alarcon and Jackie Goldberg care if the Department of Water and Power hires a media and public relations firm? The answer is a mixture of politics, loyalty and city policy. Alarcon, who is in a heated campaign for a state Senate seat against former Assemblyman Richard Katz, says he was asked by a DWP union--whose members were targeted for layoffs--to pull the $3-million contract away from Fleishman Hillard Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992
For the second time in less than a year, city officials in once fast-growing Palmdale are being forced to lay off employees and make other cutbacks to cope with lagging revenues and fiscal uncertainty. The City Council on Thursday night approved a plan to cut 14 employees, nine full-time and five part-time; reduce two full-time workers to part-time status, and eliminate funding for six vacant positions. The targeted jobs were spread over a range of city departments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993 | BOB ELSTON
The City Council this week got a peek at a proposed 1993-94 city budget that includes elimination of 48 municipal positions, including 11 in the Police Department and about a dozen part-time summer jobs. In the last several months, directors in each of the municipal departments have been working to eliminate an anticipated $6-million shortfall in the next fiscal year's budget.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Healthier Banks Cause Agency Cutbacks: The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., recognizing that banks' financial condition is improving, said it will close most of its offices and cut half the staff in the division that sells the properties held by failed banks. The drastic restructuring of the liquidation division, to begin next month, aims to save the agency $430 million by the end of 1997 and $170 million a year after that.
NEWS
September 8, 1988
The city of Yonkers, N.Y., which faces $1 million-a-day fines starting Friday, will begin laying off hundreds of employees as part of a "doomsday plan" to delay bankruptcy, state officials said. The fines stem from the City Council's refusal to approve a housing desegregation plan ordered by a federal judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have taken a solid 10. Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon had been trying to muster 10 council votes in an effort to cancel a contract that will provide $3 million for outside public relations work for the DWP. Alarcon and Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg had objected to the contract, saying that the timing was bad because the DWP is amid layoffs and voluntary buyouts. But a last-minute agreement Tuesday afternoon between the DWP and the Architects and Engineers Assn.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Park Service Ranger Wayne Elliot was working at his desk in the rustic Ocracoke Island visitors' center Saturday morning when his supervisor called to tell him to shut down his portion of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore on North Carolina's Outer Banks. The first thing Elliot did was to close the restrooms. Then he went to face campers at one of Ocracoke Island's 80 sites--to tell them they had to roll up their tents and leave by noon today.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pink slips on Christmas Eve? That's what as many as 100 top Allegheny County employees received, via special delivery. They were expecting to lose their jobs as part of a changeover in government, but the timing was particularly disturbing to them. "This is a Grinch-like way of treating people, as far as I'm concerned," county solicitor Ira Weis said. Commissioner Larry Dunn said the letters were supposed to arrive later this week, but a postal foul-up brought them earlier.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Healthier Banks Cause Agency Cutbacks: The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., recognizing that banks' financial condition is improving, said it will close most of its offices and cut half the staff in the division that sells the properties held by failed banks. The drastic restructuring of the liquidation division, to begin next month, aims to save the agency $430 million by the end of 1997 and $170 million a year after that.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., recognizing that the health of the banking industry is improving, said Wednesday that it will close most of its offices nationwide and cut half the staff in the division that sells properties held by failed banks. The drastic restructuring of the liquidation division, to begin next month, aims to save the agency $430 million by the end of 1997 and $170 million a year after that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993 | BOB ELSTON
The City Council this week got a peek at a proposed 1993-94 city budget that includes elimination of 48 municipal positions, including 11 in the Police Department and about a dozen part-time summer jobs. In the last several months, directors in each of the municipal departments have been working to eliminate an anticipated $6-million shortfall in the next fiscal year's budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with cuts in state revenue, the city of Anaheim will have to eliminate 43 jobs, possibly laying off as many as 23 employees to balance its 1993-94 budget, according to a proposal being considered by the City Council. The impact on jobs and city services will be even more severe if the council does not extend a temporary utility tax when it expires Sept. 30, the proposed budget released Wednesday states.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California counties, already limping along on bare-bones budgets weakened by a recessionary economy, are preparing to slash such essential services as police and criminal prosecutions to an extent not seen since Proposition 13 was passed in 1978.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pink slips on Christmas Eve? That's what as many as 100 top Allegheny County employees received, via special delivery. They were expecting to lose their jobs as part of a changeover in government, but the timing was particularly disturbing to them. "This is a Grinch-like way of treating people, as far as I'm concerned," county solicitor Ira Weis said. Commissioner Larry Dunn said the letters were supposed to arrive later this week, but a postal foul-up brought them earlier.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | BOB BAKER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Excuse Sandy Denny, the office supervisor at the Social Security Administration office in Huntington Beach, if she yawned at work Tuesday. She had stayed up late Monday night to watch a broadcast about the fate of the federal budget--and the fate of her job. As it turned out, President Bush and Congress agreed on a temporary funding bill early Tuesday to end a three-day federal government shutdown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992
For the second time in less than a year, city officials in once fast-growing Palmdale are being forced to lay off employees and make other cutbacks to cope with lagging revenues and fiscal uncertainty. The City Council on Thursday night approved a plan to cut 14 employees, nine full-time and five part-time; reduce two full-time workers to part-time status, and eliminate funding for six vacant positions. The targeted jobs were spread over a range of city departments.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State and city governments throughout the country are under financial siege, and as the crisis deepens, horror stories emerge from abstract budget numbers. In San Diego County, a severely psychotic, homeless young man shouts at phantom voices as he sits starving in a public park. County mental health workers battle for weeks to admit him to a psychiatric ward. But the county's lack of funds means that no beds are available.
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