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Government Orders

BUSINESS
July 2, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Xerox Corp., whose accounting is under U.S. regulatory investigation, said that its Indian subsidiary made "improper payments" to government officials and that two other overseas operations face legal or tax problems. The world's largest copier manufacturer said a majority-owned subsidiary in India, Xerox Modicorp Ltd., paid $600,000 to $700,000 during 2000 to win government orders.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
A federal judge has ruled that fees collected for the "Beef: It's What's for Dinner" advertising campaign violate the free-speech rights of cattle producers, in the latest case in a long-standing dispute among farmers. U.S. District Judge Charles B. Kornmann ordered the government to stop collecting the fee of $1 per head of cattle, which amounts to about $88 million per year, to fund the research and promotion campaign. The order takes effect July 15. "I am disappointed by the ruling," U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Zimbabwe's highest court Thursday ordered the government to remove squatters from hundreds of white-owned farms, and the country's leadership responded by broadcasting a radio appeal for the protesters to leave. The appeal by Vice President Joseph Msika was the latest move in Zimbabwe's land crisis: About 50,000 squatters refuse to give up the farms, prompting farmers and opposition groups to demand police action.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korea's defense minister ordered an inquiry into a report that the U.S. military used Agent Orange and other toxic defoliants along the border with North Korea in the late 1960s. The report by SBS-TV in Seoul on Monday night quoted declassified U.S. documents. A spokeswoman for the U.S. military said officials were looking into the matter. Copies of the documents indicate that the U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with growing public outrage, Turkey's government Thursday ordered a criminal investigation of builders whose slipshod construction methods led to the collapse of hundreds of tall apartment complexes in this week's deadly earthquake.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government was ordered Tuesday to pay the heirs of amateur filmmaker Abraham Zapruder $16 million for seizing one of the nation's most macabre artifacts--the 26-second film capturing President John F. Kennedy's final moments. An arbitration panel charged with determining the value of the film said that the figure might be on the low side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council moved Friday to close a legal loophole that allowed City Atty. James Hahn to resolve a $250,000 police shooting case without the council's approval. The council ordered Hahn to draft an ordinance that will limit his authority to settle lawsuits of more than $100,000 regardless of the number of plaintiffs.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about a tough market. M.P. Bhandara is the chief of Pakistan's only brewery. And the fruits of his work--whiskey, rum, gin and beer--are off-limits to 97% of Pakistanis. In a country of 140 million, Bhandara is permitted to sell his brew in only 12 shops. On the other side of the concrete walls of his Rawalpindi brewery, fundamentalist Muslims are calling for the demise of his business.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1998 | From Reuters
Northwest Airlines Corp.'s commuter affiliates must continue to fly to underserved areas despite a pilots strike that has shut down the nation's fourth-largest airline for a week, the federal government said Friday. St. Paul, Minn.-based Northwest must also provide the necessary support for Mesaba Holdings Inc.'s Mesaba Aviation and Express Airlines Inc.
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