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BUSINESS
January 19, 2006 | Michael Hiltzik
One recent afternoon in Los Alamitos, I watched Marcy Zwelling-Aamot, M.D., pick her way through a government website designed to help elderly patients select the right Medicare drug plan, based on their prescription needs and hometown. The website, created for the launch of Medicare's new prescription drug benefit, identified 48 individual plans available for Southern California residents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
As often happens when the financial demands on government social programs rise, there's been a lot of talk lately about the need to return to the traditional American system of community and faith-based help for the needy: charity, not government handouts. One hears this most often from fiscal conservatives such as House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), who spoke on the radio not long ago about how suburbanites shouldn't drive past blighted neighborhoods and say, "I'm paying my taxes, government's going to fix that.
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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
OPINION
January 25, 2014
Re "The GOP discovers inequality," Opinion, Jan. 22 The usually insightful Doyle McManus describes how Republicans have begun to shift their message, if not their actual practices, toward acknowledgment of the bitter harvest of inequality. At the same time, he writes, the GOP is hardly ready to become the party of "big government. " Excuse me, but in the states and in Congress, the GOP has advocated for sticking government's fingers into women's bodies and into everybody's bedroom.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
As often happens when the financial demands on government social programs rise, there's been a lot of talk lately about the need to return to the traditional American system of community and faith-based help for the needy: charity, not government handouts. One hears this most often from fiscal conservatives such as House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), who spoke on the radio not long ago about how suburbanites shouldn't drive past blighted neighborhoods and say, "I'm paying my taxes, government's going to fix that.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1997 | ALLEN G. BREED, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Geneva Thacker's wish sounds simple enough. She'd like city water hooked up to her trailer so she and her two young children don't have to carry it anymore. "I pack it in buckets from Mommy's," said the 29-year-old eastern Kentucky woman, who washes clothes by hand and uses a barrel to catch rainwater. "It's a big hill. That'd mean everything to me to get to put my bathroom in and my water. "I'd probably think I was rich."
OPINION
May 26, 1996
Most people want to live to a healthy and productive old age, and increasing numbers of Americans are achieving that goal, at least in part. The Census Bureau now counts 3 million people who are 85 or older. In the next quarter-century, thanks to healthier lifestyles and advances in medical knowledge and technology, that number is expected to more than double. And there's no reason to think it won't go on rising.
FOOD
April 9, 1987 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
The federal government suffers from complacency in its approach to the worsening hunger problem in this country, said a former U.S. Department of Agriculture senior official. The attitude, primarily a recent development, is fostered by a false belief that the poor already receive sufficient help from the food programs now in place, said Carol Tucker Foreman, an assistant agriculture secretary during the Carter Administration.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2005 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
The number of workers in California and their families covered by job-based health insurance fell in recent years, but government programs filled in much of the gap, so that the number of uninsured statewide remained about the same, according to a UCLA study to be released today. Adults covered by company-sponsored health insurance in the state fell 2 percentage points to 54.5% of the population from 2001 to 2003, while medical coverage for children dropped nearly 4 percentage points to 52.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
When Rick Santorum stood in front of voters at a yacht club in this small town and pledged to slash government spending, especially entitlement programs, Nancy Garvin knew she had found her candidate. Garvin, 54, said she was sick of seeing government squander money through agencies that don't do anything, and wants expenditures cut "in half. " "Washington is throwing money away through a lot of wasteful spending," she said, sitting at a picnic table beneath trees draped in graying Spanish moss.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
Fifty years ago Wednesday, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered what may have been the last genuinely uplifting State of the Union speech we've had. "This administration, here and now, declares unconditional war on poverty in America," he said. "We shall not rest until that war is won. The richest nation on Earth can afford to win it. We cannot afford to lose it. " Since LBJ's launch of the War on Poverty, the effort has become a whipping boy on the right and even the left.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama made a highly personal case for raising the minimum wage and strengthening the social safety net in an address Wednesday recalling the government programs that helped him and his wife get ahead in life. In a lengthy speech about income inequality in America, Obama declared it the “defining challenge of our time” to make sure the economy works for rich and poor alike. “I take this personally,” Obama said. “I'm only here because this country educated my grandfather on the GI bill.” PHOTOS: 2013's memorable political moments When his father left and his mom hit hard times trying to raise two children while going to school, he said, “this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry.” And when Michelle Obama's working-class parents wanted to send her to college, he said, “this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back.” “What drives me as a grandson, a son, a father, as an American,” he said, “is to make sure that every striving, hardworking, optimistic kid in America has the same incredible chance that his country gave me.” In what sounded at times like a preview of a State of the Union address, Obama spelled out his economic priorities and outlined his approach as he enters negotiations with congressional Republicans over budget and fiscal matters.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2013 | Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
It's been a constant quandary for the Obama White House: Should the president reach out to his Republican opponents or isolate them? Should he compromise to move his agenda or try to split the GOP ranks? Carrot or stick? That debate appeared settled on Thursday when President Obama spoke in the White House State Dining Room to deliver his verdict on the just- ended government shutdown: more stick. "To all my friends in Congress, understand that how business is done in this town has to change," Obama said as he praised "responsible Republicans" for brokering the deal but denounced "the pressure from the extremes.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By David Lauter
More than half of Americans who identify themselves as supporters of the tea-party movement say the government has no need to ever raise the current limit on the national debt, putting themselves at sharp odds with the majority of Americans, who say that a debt increase is “absolutely essential.” That gap, found by a new Pew Research Center survey , underscores that the deadlock in Congress reflects a deep division in the country. Asked if a debt ceiling increase was “absolutely essential to avoid an economic crisis,” 51% of Americans said yes, with an additional 11% saying the debt limit would have to be raised eventually but “not for several weeks.” FULL COVERAGE: The U.S. government shutdown Nearly one in four Americans, however, said that the limit “does not have to be raised at all.” That group included 37% of self-identified Republicans.
OPINION
October 8, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
For all the acrimony in Washington over Obamacare, there's an intriguing consensus around one issue: the ratchet effect. Neither side uses the term, but both the right and left treat it as an article of faith. The term was coined by the libertarian economist Robert Higgs. In his book "Crisis and Leviathan," Higgs described how the state takes on massive new powers during a crisis, usually wars. When the crisis subsides, the state relinquishes some of those powers, but it never gives them all back.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By David Lauter
Much of the federal government will shut down as of midnight. What will be closing, why and what impact will it have? Question: Why a shutdown? Answer: Every year, Congress has to approve laws, known as appropriations, that provide money for federal agencies. The new budget year begins on Oct. 1, and Congress has failed to pass a single one of the appropriations. An effort to pass a stop-gap bill to provide temporary money has stalled in Congress: Republicans have insisted they will not approve the stop-gap measure unless Democrats agree to block money for President Obama's healthcare law, and Democrats have refused to do that.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The questions blaze anew in the wake of last week's rioting in Los Angeles: Has the federal government done enough to combat poverty in the nation's inner cities? Have its efforts helped--or hurt, as some critics say?
BUSINESS
July 31, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman, Tiffany Hsu and Jim Puzzanghera
With surprising swiftness, the government's "cash for clunkers" program has burned through its $1-billion budget in less than a week as car buyers swarmed dealerships, and federal officials were scrambling late Thursday night to find more money to keep it going.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A reporter recently asked the National Security Agency's chief a blunt question: Why can't he come up with a better example of a terrorism plot foiled through the bulk collection of U.S. phone records? In the weeks since Edward Snowden disclosed that the NSA had been collecting and storing the calling histories of nearly every American, NSA Director Keith Alexander and other U.S. officials have cited only one case as having been discovered exclusively by searching those records: some San Diego men who sent $8,500 to Al Qaeda-linked militants in Somalia.
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