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NEWS
January 17, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Moving aggressively to defend what he considers one of the crown jewels of his Administration, President Clinton on Monday assailed Republican efforts to gut the 6-month-old national service program. Clinton's vigorous defense of the volunteer program marked a deliberate attempt to pick a fight with the new GOP majority in Congress over an issue on which Clinton believes he has the public's support and the moral high ground.
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NEWS
January 10, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and ALISSA RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A tough campaign to root out fraud, with an assist from low inflation, has slowed Medicare's spending growth to its lowest level in the program's 35-year history, according to a government report to be issued today. If such savings can be maintained, they could guarantee Medicare's financial soundness for years and delay the drastic changes some politicians have warned will be necessary to keep the program solvent for the so-called baby boom generation. Medicare spending rose a scant 2.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welfare recipients' checks would be cut. Automatic cost-of-living raises for social programs would be suspended. More than 10,000 state workers may lose their jobs. From all this, you might conclude that the state budget is shrinking. But it's not. The 1991-1992 budget plan the Assembly passed Thursday would increase spending 11% over the current fiscal year, which ends June 30, according to numbers supplied by the state Finance Department.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As thousands of AIDS researchers and activists from more than 100 countries headed toward Vancouver for this weekend's 11th International AIDS Conference, controversy erupted Friday over the Canadian government's commitment to fighting the epidemic. A wide spectrum of Canadian AIDS research and activist groups launched a nationwide publicity blitz to protest the government's decision not to renew $31 million in annual funding for Canada's principal AIDS program after 1998.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they conduct their assault on the federal budget deficit, congressional Republicans are counting on an economic windfall from lower interest rates to help pay for tax relief, cushion the pain for some Americans who lose federal benefits and bolster the entire system of free enterprise. Yet many economists caution that nobody really knows how far or fast interest rates would fall if the federal budget were balanced. "We should be skeptical about particular numbers," said Allan H.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the middle of the month, the Second Harvest Food Bank in Watsonville, Calif., is inundated with frantic phone calls from poor families with small children. They have already exhausted their food stamps and they need emergency donations to make it to the next allotment. "I get a box of food from the food bank, and that gets me through to the beginning of the next month," says Lisa Doughty, a single mother of two.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, struggling to bring the nation's premier early education program for poor children into a new age of welfare reform, took new steps Tuesday to encourage those running Head Start programs to offer full-time, year-round services.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complicating efforts to quickly pass an $8.6-billion earthquake assistance package, the House Democratic leadership reluctantly took steps late Wednesday virtually assuring that at least some of the aid will be offset by spending cuts in other federal programs.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislators probing a trouble-plagued statewide computer network to track deadbeat parents heard assurances Tuesday that the system is fixable, but also warnings that further "undiscovered problems" lie ahead. The price tag for the computer system was originally estimated at $99 million. As recently as last week, officials said it would cost $260 million. But at Tuesday's hearing, state officials raised the estimate to $305 million.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
It is a legacy of the Lyndon Johnson years that lived on while other seeds of the Great Society went fallow or died on the vine--flourishing, in fact, despite periodic political firestorms and charges from the right. But after a 30-year roller-coaster ride, Congress is on the verge of drastically reducing legal aid for the nation's 39 million poor people in the most dramatic change since the program was created as part of the War on Poverty in 1965. The budget of the Legal Services Corp.
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