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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998 | ROBERT M. HERTZBERG and GEORGE RUNNER, Assemblyman Robert M. Hertzberg (D-Sherman Oaks) represents the 40th Assembly District. Assemblyman George Runner (R-Lancaster) represents the 36th Assembly District
You board a flight to Chicago. Three hours later, the pilot announces that the plane has used enough fuel so he is preparing to land. "Are we there yet? Did we make it to Chicago?" you ask. "Who knows?" the pilot replies. "We don't keep track." As we see it, far too many government programs run like this aircraft: destination unknown, time of arrival uncertain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Democrats and special interests have a long wish list of government programs they want to spend more on now that California's budget crisis has faded. They hope to use the latest report from the nonpartisan legislative analyst, who forecast more tax revenue than Gov. Jerry Brown has predicted, as ammunition to support their spending increases. In his Thursday column, George Skelton plots out how he would use the money if he were handed the purse strings.  "The politicians should break out the checkbook for at least one new expenditure: restoring adult dental care for poor people," he writes.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
The news of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's death this week was striking not because it came as a surprise. Rather it was because his death ignited a bitter debate over what the populist leader's lasting legacy will be at home and abroad. To his supporters, Chavez was a force for good who made them a priority, who established government programs to combat poverty and illiteracy. But to his critics, he was little more than an old-style Latin American caudillo , or strongman, who mismanaged the country's vast oil wealth and allowed inflation and crime to spiral out of control.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A top Democrat pressured fellow progressives Tuesday to consider long-term changes to the social safety net, even as the party digs in for a fight to save Medicare and other government programs from deep budget cuts. As closed-door talks continue with the hope of a year-end deal, President Obama will travel to a Pennsylvania toy store this week to pressure Congress to extend the expiring tax cuts for the middle class, while letting those for the wealthiest 2% of Americans expire.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama made a highly personal case for raising the minimum wage and strengthening the social safety net in an address Wednesday recalling the government programs that helped him and his wife get ahead in life. In a lengthy speech about income inequality in America, Obama declared it the “defining challenge of our time” to make sure the economy works for rich and poor alike. “I take this personally,” Obama said. “I'm only here because this country educated my grandfather on the GI bill.” PHOTOS: 2013's memorable political moments When his father left and his mom hit hard times trying to raise two children while going to school, he said, “this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry.” And when Michelle Obama's working-class parents wanted to send her to college, he said, “this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back.” “What drives me as a grandson, a son, a father, as an American,” he said, “is to make sure that every striving, hardworking, optimistic kid in America has the same incredible chance that his country gave me.” In what sounded at times like a preview of a State of the Union address, Obama spelled out his economic priorities and outlined his approach as he enters negotiations with congressional Republicans over budget and fiscal matters.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
Forty impoverished communities to be chosen nationwide would get tax breaks, regulatory relief and new government programs under a bill passed overwhelmingly by the House on Tuesday as a partial solution for places not sharing in America's prosperity. With a solid 394-27 bipartisan vote, the House sent the bill to the Senate, where a similar measure is pending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1991 | GARY GALLES, Gary Galles is an associate professor of economics at Pepperdine University. and
Gov. Wilson and President Bush have both proposed their budgets for the coming year. Citing hard times, both include some reductions in funding for certain programs. In time-honored tradition, these threatened cuts are beginning to draw howls of "unfair" from groups threatened with reduced support and their legislative sponsors. The threatened groups will predictably call hearings designed to show just how unfair the proposed cuts are.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
No question, Mitt Romney's extensive debate preparation is paying off. At least in the first half of the debate, he seemed more emotionally connected than President Obama with the material -- making jokes and self-deprecating remarks and even invoking Big Bird  in a discussion about the deficit and budget priorities. When moderator Jim Lehrer of PBS asked each candidate to describe the difference between his plan to attack the deficit and his opponent's, Romney couched the issue in moral terms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
After the Music Stopped The Financial Crisis, the Response and the Work Ahead Alan Blinder Penguin Press: 496 pp., $29.95 "Obamanomics was an incoherent blur to most citizens - and a not very successful blur, at that," writes Alan Blinder in "After the Music Stopped: The Financial Crisis, the Response and the Work Ahead," a thoughtful attempt by one of the nation's top economists to puzzle through what happened in 2007-09 with the...
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