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July 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative die-hards and reformers went to war Tuesday for the hearts and minds of the Soviet Communist Party, with Yegor K. Ligachev denouncing the Gorbachev era's "reckless radicalism" and other leaders defending policies that stripped the "evil empire" label from their nation. One day after President Mikhail S.
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NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - The head of the Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday that it would take years to turn over all the documents subpoenaed by the House Oversight and Government Reform committee in its investigation of the IRS' alleged targeting of conservative groups. During a confrontational hearing, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said he needed more time to comply with the committee's request for the email correspondence of Lois Lerner, a former IRS official in charge of the agency's nonprofit division.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A proposal to revamp the way California handles its budget and web of state regulations is running into opposition from politicians, unions and various activists who say it would only worsen Sacramento's dysfunction. The wonky measure, Proposition 31, could have far-reaching effects on state government. California Forward, the nonpartisan organization behind the initiative, says its provisions would increase transparency and accountability in a Capitol not known for either.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
You know a bill is in trouble in Congress when its opponents come up with increasingly infantile reasons for killing it. That's the coming fate of immigration reform in Washington. To hear House Republicans talk, it's worth killing because (a) passing it would give President Obama a victory when he's already had too many, (b) he's just using it to hurt the GOP, (c) it may or may not, but probably will, lead to "amnesty," and (d) Obama wants it to happen. Yes, obviously a, b, and d are basically the same thing, but the point is that a tolerably powerful cadre of House Republicans don't want immigration reform to happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
State and local government must find new ways of doing business or risk ruin, state Controller Kathleen Connell warned a group of San Fernando Valley business leaders Friday. Addressing a meeting of the board of directors of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn. at the newly reopened Northridge Fashion Center, Connell said the state's precarious fiscal condition should compel government and the private sector to cut waste and create jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many of her neighbors, Garden Grove resident Barbara Anderson says she's fed up with city and county government and proclaims wholehearted support for the concept of the year: restructuring. But mention one downsizing proposal under consideration--disbanding her city's Fire Department in favor of contract service from the county fire authority--and Anderson's zeal wanes. "I think we have a good Fire Department. I don't see the purpose of messing with it," she said warily.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A reformist government forged from a political deal to overturn Romania's post-Communist legacy took office after parliament backed its pledges to speed up market-oriented change. "This is another kind of government, capable and willing to change Romania's fate," Prime Minister Victor Ciorbea said after taking the oath of office.
WORLD
October 27, 2003 | Mauricio Hoyos and T. Christian Miller, Special to The Times
President Alvaro Uribe suffered a surprising double blow in two days of balloting that ended Sunday as Colombian voters rejected most elements of a government reform package he had promoted and chose one of his political enemies as mayor of the nation's capital. Uribe, America's closest political ally in South America, had made the package of 15 constitutional reforms the centerpiece of his agenda, introducing it to Congress the day he took office last year.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Whenever someone proposed tinkering with government in California in the past, a familiar outcry went up from a chorus of anti-reform skeptics: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." This time, however, there is considerable agreement that the state's tangled mosaic of state and local government is indeed broke, or at least dysfunctional. The dilemma is how to fix it.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As William Hauck labored to explain a plan to modernize California's bewildering maze of 7,000 separate governments, he blurted to reporters: "The easiest answer is to declare there are no more local governments and start over again." Well, why not? After all, Hauck is the chairman of the 23-member California Constitution Revision Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A proposal to revamp the way California handles its budget and web of state regulations is running into opposition from politicians, unions and various activists who say it would only worsen Sacramento's dysfunction. The wonky measure, Proposition 31, could have far-reaching effects on state government. California Forward, the nonpartisan organization behind the initiative, says its provisions would increase transparency and accountability in a Capitol not known for either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
A congressional committee has launched a wide-ranging examination of the California high-speed rail project, including possible conflicts of interest and how the agency overseeing it plans to spend billions of dollars in federal assistance. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, chaired by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista), notified the California High-Speed Authority about the review Monday and ordered the agency to preserve its documents and records of past communications.
WORLD
March 25, 2012 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
The cigarette smoke hovers dense inside the neighborhood cafe. Young patrons knock back beers at greasy wooden tables. A heated debate rages about Syria's revolt. The rotund bar owner labels the rebels baltajiya , or bandits, who are ravaging towns and villages. Demonstrators want only change and freedom, replies a young man in a hooded sweat shirt. Others wrangle over the president and the uncertain future. It is a striking scene for a tightly controlled police state.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama this morning will ask Congress to give him authority to significantly shrink the federal government by merging six agencies dealing with trade and commerce, a senior administration official said. Obama is seeking power to propose a sweeping consolidation of agencies with overlapping duties with an eye toward saving money and improving performance, the official said. The president is asking Congress to grant him authority held by no president since Ronald Reagan.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
A septuagenarian anticorruption activist ended a 13-day hunger strike Sunday with a glass of coconut water after India's Parliament bowed to his demands, agreeing to create a powerful, independent lokpal , or ombudsman, with authority to go after high-level corruption. Whether or not the new agency has teeth or ultimately does much to stem endemic corruption remains to be seen. What is clear, however, is that activist Anna Hazare ("Anna" is an honorific title meaning elder brother)
WORLD
March 24, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf and Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of people took to the streets in the southern city of Dara, chanting "Syria, Freedom," a day after a deadly crackdown on protests there, human rights activists said. The demonstrations Thursday occurred at the funerals for some of those killed when government forces opened fire on protesters the previous day. Initial reports put the death toll at 15, but Reuters news agency, citing a hospital source, said more than 25 people were killed. Video on YouTube purporting to show the assault included images of streets littered with bodies, some shot in the head.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
One week after a coup that was inspired by a bloody church massacre, the Roman Catholic bishops of Haiti sent a strong appeal Sunday for justice and democracy to Haiti's new military leaders and called urgently for intensified foreign aid to raise the impoverished country from the abyss.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Has Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton lost just his voice in New York--or also part of his message? That's what some advocates of government reform--including several in the orbit of Clinton's Democratic presidential campaign--say they are wondering after listening to his discussion of urban issues here.
WORLD
February 25, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Mohamed Albuflasa was different from everyone else taking the stage on the second day of Bahrain's protests. He was a Sunni Muslim. The 34-year-old Salafist favored government reform, and he believed he should speak at the rally to promote unity among the country's Shiite Muslim majority and Sunnis at Manama's Pearl Square. Within hours, a security agency had detained him, and he has not been seen since. Even as hundreds of political prisoners were freed this week by King Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa, Albuflasa remains jailed and his whereabouts a mystery.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Darrell Issa, the California congressman who has promised to closely scrutinize the Obama administration, will become chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in the new GOP-controlled House of Representatives in January, it was announced on Wednesday. The appointment had been expected. Issa (R-Vista) is the ranking minority member of the committee in the current Congress. As chairman, Issa will be the leading voice in choosing what to investigate. A frequent Republican critic in the current Congress, Issa has said he wanted to seek new subpoena powers for dozens of federal agency watchdogs as part of a campaign to downsize government spending.
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