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MAGAZINE
October 8, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, James Risen is a national correspondent in The Times' Washington bureau. His last article for the magazine was on the Rose Law Firm of Little Rock, Ark., and its role in the Whitewater scandal
Deep in the basement of the Central Intelligence Agency's sprawling headquarters complex in Langley, Va., the staff of the agency's Crime and Narcotics Center sat rigidly at one end of a long conference table, girding for a unique briefing for the Washington press corps. The CIA men--they were all men--were clearly uncomfortable. They had worked in the shadows all their lives, and the media seemed to fill them with more dread than the KGB.
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NEWS
April 14, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the infamous "Case of the Engineers," the crime of Enrik Veizi and three other oil exploration experts was having the cheek to tell the government that it was drilling for oil in an area where it was known there was none. For challenging the leadership's wisdom, they were tortured into confessing to sabotage and spying. A court condemned them to 25 years in prison, extolling the leniency that let them escape with their lives.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Despite some progress, congressional investigators cast doubt on whether efforts by American International Group Inc. to restructure its operations and pay back the government will ever prove successful. Still, the company's shares jumped $8.49, or 21%, to $48.40 after the head of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform said that panel would examine a plan to reduce the AIG bailout package. The Federal Reserve and Treasury Department have provided $182.3 billion to AIG.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frantic effort to save its collapsing economy, the Soviet Union sold two-thirds of its gold reserves in the last year, spent all of its foreign currency holdings and went deeper into debt overseas, the government's chief economist said Friday. Grigory A. Yavlinsky, deputy chairman of the provisional committee managing the Soviet economy, said the Soviet Union, one of the world's major gold producers, now holds only 240 tons in gold reserves, worth about $2.7 billion.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A handclasp and a walk in the woods in Geneva. Frigid stares and tight lips in the blustery cold of Reykjavik. The signing in Washington of a historic treaty on medium-range nuclear weapons. And now in Moscow, a walk through the heart of the "evil empire." The moods and images of the four summits of Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev have differed in ways both subtle and striking.
SPORTS
November 14, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although West Germany has more than twice as much land and almost three times as many people, it has won fewer than half as many Olympic medals as East Germany since they began competing as separate nations in 1968. The disparity does not have to be explained, particularly not to West Germans. But last year, as East Germany's political leader, Erich Honecker felt compelled to do so, anyway.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are not worried about the prospect of a reunified Germany once again dominating Europe, but the notion scares people in Poland and concerns the British and French, according to a survey conducted jointly by The Times Poll and The Economist. In the abstract, Americans and the French overwhelmingly favor the idea of reuniting West Germany and East Germany nearly 45 years after the crushing defeat of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In American terms, it would be like tearing the Midwest from the map of the United States and proclaiming it an independent country. Gone would be the industrial muscle of Chicago and Detroit, along with the choicest part of the nation's granary. The ICBMs at Grand Forks would slip from Washington's control. To travel to St. Louis or a thousand other destinations, U.S. citizens would need passports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996
The ongoing saga of Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's government reform initiative took a decidedly political turn Wednesday when the City Council instructed the city clerk to decide whether the petition qualified for the ballot. The petition to create a government reform panel has been in limbo for days because neither City Clerk J. Michael Carey nor the county registrar-recorder was willing to take the responsibility of certifying the controversial petition.
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