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Government Reform

NEWS
November 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In American terms, it would be like tearing the Midwest from the map of the United States and proclaiming it an independent country. Gone would be the industrial muscle of Chicago and Detroit, along with the choicest part of the nation's granary. The ICBMs at Grand Forks would slip from Washington's control. To travel to St. Louis or a thousand other destinations, U.S. citizens would need passports.
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NEWS
December 17, 1989
It was normal that East Germans came to Hungary in the summertime. They had been doing it for years, either in busloads on specially arranged holiday tours, or in their little plastic-bodied Trabant cars, enjoying the Hungarian food, the easy looseness of the place. They went to Lake Balaton and swam; the young people hiked about with backpacks and bedrolls and slept in crowded youth hostels or campgrounds.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the Soviet people Monday that Josef Stalin committed "enormous and unforgivable" crimes in the 1930s, and he announced that a top-level commission has been set up to investigate them and exonerate their victims. At the same time, Gorbachev praised Stalin's decision to collectivize farming and proceed with rapid, state-controlled industrialization despite the "excesses" and widespread suffering they caused.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Madame Ngo Ba Thanh has a business card that reads like a recipe for success. Three times the size of any ordinary card, it lists these essential ingredients: a masters of comparative law from Columbia University and doctorates of law from the universities of Barcelona and Paris. Next, blend in her experience as former chair of the law-drafting Legislative Committee of Vietnam's National Assembly, or Parliament. The result is a powerful potion of legal proficiency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996
The ongoing saga of Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's government reform initiative took a decidedly political turn Wednesday when the City Council instructed the city clerk to decide whether the petition qualified for the ballot. The petition to create a government reform panel has been in limbo for days because neither City Clerk J. Michael Carey nor the county registrar-recorder was willing to take the responsibility of certifying the controversial petition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1996
A feud over a petition drive to create a municipal government reform panel took another twist Tuesday, when lawyers for Mayor Richard Riordan suggested that Councilman Nate Holden violated the law by asking a judge to delay a ruling on the matter. Riordan and his supporters sued the city after the city attorney's office suggested that the City Council has the discretion to delay the reform measure's appearance on the ballot. U.S. District Judge Mariana R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1996
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan and his supporters submitted 300,000 signatures Wednesday to create an elected government reform panel. The campaign needs 197,000 valid signatures to qualify a measure for the April ballot but Riordan and his backers submitted an additional 103,000 to compensate for invalid or duplicate signatures that were collected. Riordan has argued that the city is governed by an outdated and inefficient government charter that was adopted in 1925.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS
Government reform of the managed-care industry will be at the top of the agenda. Expect to see a flurry of legislation in Washington and Sacramento now that federal and state commissions have issued recommendations on how to better protect consumers enrolled in HMOs and other health plans. The fate of hospital giant Columbia/HCA, the target of a sweeping federal criminal investigation, will become clearer in 1998.
NEWS
January 17, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Goh Chok Tong bristled last week as he stood before his colleagues in Parliament and promoted a plan to change the electoral system here. "I don't think we are tinkering with the system," declared the first deputy prime minister. "We are making improvements . . . based on 22 years of working it. We are trying to remove a weakness." "Tinkering"--the word used by a government official to describe the reaction of some Singaporeans to the proposed change--carries a negative connotation, Goh, the No.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Andrew Manson, a white South African, and his mixed-race Danish wife moved here a decade ago, they found an oasis of racial tolerance and tranquillity. While apartheid gripped South Africa a few miles away, this tiny nation--created by apartheid's social engineers--had a black ruler, multiracial schools, mixed neighborhoods and equal opportunities for all races. But, oh, how the tables have turned.
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