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Government Regulation

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BUSINESS
May 9, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you walk into your neighborhood fish market or grocery store, the display case is filled with "fresh" swordfish, "fresh" salmon, "fresh" shrimp, "fresh" petrale sole. But then you take your catch home and find that your "fresh" filet has a frozen center. Or your fork finds mush instead of firm flesh. How long has your dinner been away from the ocean? And what has happened to it since it left the waves behind?
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Chris O'Brien
WASHINGTON - The White House has released guidelines aimed at prodding companies that run some of the nation's most essential services such as utilities, cellphone towers and banks to better protect themselves from cyberattacks. Officials said the guidelines, developed under an executive order that President Obama signed a year ago, provide companies overseeing the nation's crucial infrastructure with a blueprint for identifying potential threats, protecting themselves from cyberattacks and, if an attack occurs, recovering from it. But the voluntary nature of the guidelines showed how sharply proponents of strong regulation have scaled back their ambitions - and even their language - in the face of industry opposition to government intervention.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's conditional use permit system--damned last week by Mayor Richard Riordan as worthy of a Communist country--is to be overhauled to make it easier for non-controversial projects to win City Hall approval, a top Los Angeles city planner promised Tuesday.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2013 | Chad Terhune
Workers faced with forfeiting unused money in their flexible spending accounts for healthcare expenses may be getting some relief under a new federal rule. The U.S. Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service changed the use-it-or-lose-it rule for flexible spending arrangements, or FSAs, to allow account holders to carry over as much as $500 from one year to the next without penalty. Many workers have been reluctant to put money into the plans for fear of losing whatever they don't use, resulting in long-standing complaints about how the pretax FSAs work.
OPINION
May 1, 2011 | By Nicolas S. Martin
My 8-year-old recently got the lemonade stand itch. So we started laying plans to enrich her college fund by enticing passers-by with white chocolate-pistachio cookies and juice from organic lemons. Fortunately, our property backs onto one of the busiest paved urban trails in America, bustling on weekends with cyclists, rollerbladers and pedestrians. Visions of dollars danced in our heads. Googling for the perfect lemonade recipe, we soon found a site promoting a May 1 "national" event called Lemonade Day. This event, organizers say, is an "initiative designed to teach kids how to start, own and operate their own business — a lemonade stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1986
Frederick C. Thayer's thoughtful article (Editorial Pages, Sept. 11) on regulation of airlines points up the fallacy common among businessmen that government regulation is inherently evil. Rather, regulation imposes a degree of control for business, which keeps it from excesses that could ultimately lead to the destruction of our capitalist economy. Owners and managers of business are not "bad guys." They are people dedicated to earning maximum profits, the single purpose for which they are employed and compensated.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
An enormous new financial business that could trouble even the Federal Reserve Board and yet defies the understanding of the nation's best financial minds is terrifying governments around the world while also earning billions of dollars for the United States.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush moved with vigor Wednesday to establish himself as an enemy of big government, extending by 120 days a controversial moratorium on new federal regulations. Bush said the extension would give his advisers more time to revise pending regulations and eliminate what they see as burdensome requirements for businesses and private citizens. This winnowing-out process will spur the economy and ultimately save American consumers at least $10 billion a year, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993
It's a frightening thought, but Congress is actually considering proposals to monitor, or even regulate, TV violence. And the film industry increasingly is being held accountable for the content of movies. The old argument that media images aren't harmful washes no more. Now, better late than never, two prominent providers of programming for young people seem to have gotten the message. The Walt Disney Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jerry Chodera decided to upgrade one of his company's pollution-control devices, he was resigned to waiting months for the necessary permits. But thanks to the intervention of the newly formed Merit Partnership for Pollution Control, Chodera received the three permits he needed in a matter of weeks. "In all honesty, I was amazed," said Chodera, vice president of Wescal Industries in Rancho Dominguez, which manufactures parts for electric lights industry.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A Russian-led proposal by a coalition of countries to place further government regulation over the Internet has been withdrawn. The plan under consideration by the International Telecommunication Union would have given countries the power to block the Internet from some locations, according to Reuters. Additionally, the plan would have taken control of the allocation of Internet addresses away from ICANN, a U.S.-based organization that is under contract to the U.S. Department of Commerce.
OPINION
October 18, 2012
Re "Gasoline in the Golden State," Letters, Oct. 16 Maybe Charles T. Drevna, the president of American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers - who blamed high gas prices on government regulation - didn't live in L.A. when the air quality was so poor that the mountains were hidden from view. I remember; the smog was so bad I would come inside after playing with my lungs hurting. Finally, because of better emissions standards, our air is cleaner, public health is improved and we can see our gorgeous mountains again.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Move over salt. Step aside, saturated fat. There's a new public enemy in the pantry, and it's … sugar. In a provocative commentary coming out in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature, Dr. Robert Lustig  and two colleagues from UC San Francisco argue that the added sugars in processed foods and drinks are responsible for so many cases of chronic disease and premature deaths that their use ought to be regulated, just like alcohol and...
NATIONAL
December 22, 2011 | Neela Banerjee
The Obama administration has adopted tough new limits on mercury and other toxic emissions from power plants, winning praise from environmentalists and public health advocates but sparking warnings from industry groups that contend the new regulations are too expensive and will place dangerous pressure on the nation's electrical grid. The update to the Clean Air Act comes after a relentless 20-year battle in Washington. It marks the first time the Environmental Protection Agency has curbed power plant emissions of mercury, a known neurotoxin that can be profoundly harmful to children and pregnant women.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2011 | Neela Banerjee
The Environmental Protection Agency is expected Friday to approve a tough new rule to limit emissions of mercury, arsenic and other toxic substances from the country's power plants, according to people with knowledge of the new standard. Though mercury is a known neurotoxin that can be profoundly harmful to children and pregnant women, the air pollution rule has been more than 20 years in the making, repeatedly stymied because of objections from coal-burning utilities about the cost of installing pollution-control equipment.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
AT&T Inc. is considering whether to throw in the towel on its attempt to buy T-Mobile USA for $39 billion, which would leave its smaller rival searching for another strategy to compete in the ever-tougher wireless world. AT&T, the Justice Department and T-Mobile parent Deutsche Telekom were granted court approval Monday to halt all proceedings in the government's antitrust case against the acquisition for a month while the two wireless carriers figure out what to do next. AT&T said it and Deutsche Telekom would use the time "to evaluate all options," and both agreed with a court order to decide "whether they intend to proceed" with any transaction.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertising industry, fearing government regulation, is discussing voluntary limits on hard liquor pitches. The National Advertising Review Council said it is considering the need for limits on pitches for hard liquor and other adults-only products such as beer, wine and cigarettes. In recent weeks, two federal agencies have opened inquiries into TV ads for alcohol.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's much-maligned credit reporting industry Monday outlined self-imposed reforms, which critics said are designed to head off increased government regulation. Associated Credit Bureaus Inc., an industry group whose largest members are TRW, Equifax and Trans Union, said the reforms would make it easier for consumers to obtain and correct their credit records.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2011 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Government authorities are investigating whether MF Global Holdings Ltd., the trading firm that has filed for bankruptcy and is run by former U.S. Sen. and New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine, misused customer funds. Regulators said that the firm had not properly kept customer funds separated from the firm's own funds, raising concerns that the company may have placed big bets for its own benefit with customer money. The FBI is expected to investigate whether the firm's actions violated criminal laws, two people familiar with the situation told the Associated Press.
OPINION
June 3, 2011
Bringing back ROTC Re "Campuses welcome back a '60s outcast," June 1 I was a member of the "outcast" Naval ROTC at Stanford. At the time I was opposed to the Vietnam War, and 30 years later, I was opposed to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. But I remain strongly supportive of ROTC programs. National defense is a public good, and ROTC programs enable more students to help bear the substantial personal and national cost of it. The United States faces a danger from terrorism for the foreseeable future, and we should provide more opportunities for all members of society to participate in the defense of our country.
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