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NATIONAL
February 14, 2012 | Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
President Obama called for more spending on community colleges, job training, infrastructure, and research and development as he touted an election-year budget that seemed to complete his shift in focus from budget cutting to job creation. Arguing that the country can't "cut our way to growth," Obama delivered a $3.8-trillion budget plan to Congress and blew through a promise to cut the deficit in half by the end of his first term. Obama's budget projects a $1.3-trillion deficit in fiscal year 2012 and $901 billion in 2013, both over the $700 billion that would have made good on his pledge.
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NATIONAL
February 4, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - With another major fiscal deadline looming at month's end, House Republicans are preparing to seek only modest concessions from President Obama to raise the nation's debt ceiling and will instead try to press their political advantage on other issues. The strategy is a stark reversal from 2011, when the new House Republican majority pushed a partisan debt standoff that led to a historic downgrade in the nation's credit rating. Republicans bore the brunt of public blame for both the downgrade and last year's 16-day government shutdown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1997 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a short-lived experiment in running their own police force, Hawaiian Gardens officials want to rehire the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department to protect their one-square-mile community in order to trim costs. There's just one problem. City officials are hoping the Sheriff's Department will retain the Hawaiian Gardens officers, many of them popular fixtures in the community.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Hard-fought passage of a $1-trillion bipartisan spending bill brings to an end - for now - the era of tea-party-driven budget battles in Congress as Republican leaders part ways with their party's rebellious hard-liners and look toward new political battles. Since grass-roots conservatives hoisted Republicans to power in the House with the 2010 midterm election, party leaders can boast that they've helped slash government spending to George W. Bush-era levels, even after Democrats increased budgets to help the nation rebound from the recession.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1996
Do your letter writers really believe that the money spent on space exploration or the arts or the Bosnian peace intervention or any government spending, were it not spent on that particular item, would therefore go to feeding, educating or otherwise assisting the poor and the diseased? Don't they know the savings would merely go to lowering the taxes for the rich? MURRAY LAMISHAW Laguna Hills
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Government spending for law enforcement increased by 75% from 1979 to 1985 to $45.6 billion, while spending for all government services rose 90% in that time, according to a federal study issued Sunday. In addition, the study by the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics found that just 2.9% of total government spending financed law enforcement activities in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1989
Recommendations for cutting federal government spending, including the proposed elimination of some military bases in Southern California, will be discussed by the featured speaker at the Feb. 1 meeting of the World Affairs Council of Orange County. George S. Goldberger, president of Citizens Against Government Waste, will speak at the session, which begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Anaheim Marriott hotel.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
At the halfway point in its six-year term, the government of President Miguel de la Madrid has undertaken a piecemeal effort to strengthen the floundering Mexican economy. Some of the steps taken recently seem to be aimed at opening the economy to greater competition and less government domination. Others are attempts to correct mistakes made by the government in 1984, mistakes that have stimulated the country's crippling inflation.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke delivered a stern warning to Congress on Thursday to address the national debt, saying spiraling government spending could lead to a "vicious cycle" of even bigger federal budget deficits. "The longer we wait, the more severe, the more draconian, the more difficult the objectives are going to be" in responding to the crisis, he said. "The right time to start was about 10 years ago." Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Feb. 18, 1981, in a huge auditorium jammed with television cameras and White House officials, then-Budget Director David A. Stockman unveiled the first spending plan of the new Republican era, promising to cut taxes, increase defense outlays and--by cutting overall spending--close the federal deficit by 1984. Twelve years later, in a small room with a table full of reporters and minimal fanfare, Stockman's successor, Richard G.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Soaring healthcare spending - which helped pave the way for President Obama's health law - continued to moderate in 2012, the fourth year of a historic slowdown in how much the nation pays for medical treatment, according to a new government report. Overall spending on healthcare rose less than 4% in 2012, less than half the rate of a decade ago, independent economists at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services concluded. And for only the third time in the last 15 years, health spending rose more slowly than the overall economy.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | Lisa Mascaro
Congressional budget negotiators reached a hard-fought deal Tuesday aimed at avoiding another government shutdown, agreeing on a plan that would restore some money to programs hit by impending across-the-board cuts but trim spending on federal retirees and raise fees on airline travel. Final passage of the $85-billion package, however, remains uncertain because of rising opposition from tea party lawmakers and influential conservative groups. A House vote, expected this week, will once again test the ability of Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio)
BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
There are so many to choose from, but these four take the cake. In no particular order: 1. The Vitter amendment. Concocted by David Vitter (R-La.), this majestically cynical measure is based on the common misconception that members of Congress and their staffs are "exempted" from the Affordable Care Act. It would prohibit the government from paying for any part of the health insurance for federal legislators or their staff. The facts of the "exemption" are these: During the 2010 debate over the ACA, Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa)
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker John A. Boehner on Thursday proposed a six-week extension of the federal debt limit -- no conditions attached -- but it was unclear if a majority of his fellow Republicans would support it. Even some GOP leaders on Boehner's team balked at the proposal because it failed to include any of the party's demands for cutting spending or blocking President Obama's healthcare law. But in a brief news conference Thursday morning,...
NATIONAL
October 5, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The urgency to end the government shutdown eased Saturday as the Pentagon said it would recall nearly all its furloughed civilian employees and House Republicans focused their attention to a broader budget battle with the White House. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's surprise announcement to call about 350,000 civilian defense workers back to work next week was expected to loosen pressure on Congress and the White House to quickly end the shutdown, which was in its fifth day Saturday.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The partial government shutdown reduces the federal government's expenses but not enough to significantly push back the mid-October date by which the debt limit needs to be raised, according to Treasury Department officials and a think-tank analysis. The Treasury Department has estimated that the government would be at risk of a default if the debt limit is not raised by Oct. 17. The Bipartisan Policy Center, which has done extensive debt-limit analysis, has estimated that the so-called X Date for raising the debt limit is between Oct. 18 and Nov. 5. There's been speculation that the government shutdown could change those estimates, but in a letter to lawmakers this week, Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew said it would not. "Although the current lapse in appropriations creates some additional uncertainty, we do not believe it will impact our projections materially unless it continues for an extended period of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2009 | Nicole Santa Cruz
More than 500 people gathered in Griffith Park on Sunday to demand less government spending and voice their opposition to any government-run healthcare plan. The rally was the latest stop on a national tour -- dubbed the Tea Party Express II -- that began Sunday morning in San Diego and plans to visit 38 cities in 19 days. Organizers are calling the tour a "Countdown to Judgment Day" for elected officials, timing it to one year before the 2010 congressional elections. Sal Russo, chief strategist for the Tea Party Express II, said that his group is calling on politicians to "clean up their act" and stop voting for deficit-increasing measures.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
? U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn's bitter opposition to government spending appears to be striking a chord with Oklahoma voters, who reelected the Republican to what he says will be his last term. The Muskogee physician beat an underfunded Democratic candidate and two independents Tuesday. Coburn rode a Republican wave into the U.S. House in 1994, then served six years in Congress before returning to his medical practice. He has described himself as a "part-time lawmaker" and has promised to serve only two terms in the Senate.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Wasting little time, the Senate rejected a new House spending bill that took aim at President Obama's healthcare law, as Democrats continue to hold firm against Republican demands. It took just 24 minutes from the time the House gaveled out to recess after passing its bill for the Senate to start voting to reject the latest plan. The vote was again strictly along party lines, with 54 Democrats voting to reject the bill and 46 Republicans supporting it. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama will try to enlist help from business leaders in his standoff with congressional Republicans over government spending and a looming vote to raise the debt limit, a White House official said. At a meeting with the Business Roundtable on Wednesday, Obama will ask corporate leaders to urge Republicans to give up plans to negotiate cuts in government spending, or a repeal of Obama's healthcare law, in return for an increase in the debt limit, said the official, who asked not to be named discussing the president's remarks before the meeting.
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