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NEWS
November 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
She once performed topless in the rain so she wouldn't ruin her silk blouse, and she threatened to spike President Nixon's tea with LSD. But that was a lifetime ago for Grace Slick, the steely psychedelic rocker who added enough salt to her words to wither a seasoned sailor. These days, she has tamed that wild child. And she's turned to painting to get her creative urges out.
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NEWS
February 16, 2006 | Charlie Amter, Special to The Times
QUICK -- name a game that is the opposite of cool. If you said "bingo," you'd be wrong. Sybil Nicholson and Shelly Brown, staffers at the LA Weekly, are attempting to wrestle the game of pure luck from the embrace of retirement homes nationwide via their monthly fundraising party, Rock & Roll Bingo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | MARY CAMPBELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the truth is found to be lies And all the joy within you dies Don't you want somebody to love? --Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love" Her voice sounded like a hurricane rushing through a tunnel. There was a fury in Grace Slick's singing, even though Jefferson Airplane loved everybody. Slick wore her attitude the way others of the psychedelic age wore a peace button. "White Rabbit" made her rock's reigning acid queen, and 25 years later, she's retired from music.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gucci's Tom Ford sent models bounding down the runway in Milan earlier this month wearing witchy-looking silk jersey gowns and black crucifixes, the image was unmistakable. It was vintage Stevie Nicks with the music ("Rhiannon," "Edge of Seventeen") to match. But there was another reference, to the standard-bearer of L.A. style in the 1960s and '70s, fashion designer Holly Harp. When Ford was still in diapers, Harp was one of the original purveyors of the rich hippie look.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Paul Kantner held up a headline from the Weekly World News tabloid for his fellow members of the just re-formed Jefferson Airplane: "1960s Hippies and Radicals Were UFO Aliens." The five ex-hippies, gathered at a Canoga Park recording studio, had a good laugh. Twenty years ago, the Airplane--perhaps the most overtly political of the San Francisco hippie bands, and certainly the most commercially successful--probably did seem like a bunch of aliens to Middle America. "We are your parents' worst nightmare," provocative singer Grace Slick quipped at the time.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | Associated Press
Former Jefferson Starship lead singer Grace Slick was released on bail Saturday morning after being booked on charges of felony assault and felony brandishing a weapon at a police officer. Officers from the Tiburon Police Department went to the singer's Marin County home after receiving a call at 3:30 a.m. Saturday from an apparently intoxicated man who said a drunken woman was firing a shotgun in the house, the police report said.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gucci's Tom Ford sent models bounding down the runway in Milan earlier this month wearing witchy-looking silk jersey gowns and black crucifixes, the image was unmistakable. It was vintage Stevie Nicks with the music ("Rhiannon," "Edge of Seventeen") to match. But there was another reference, to the standard-bearer of L.A. style in the 1960s and '70s, fashion designer Holly Harp. When Ford was still in diapers, Harp was one of the original purveyors of the rich hippie look.
NEWS
February 16, 2006 | Charlie Amter, Special to The Times
QUICK -- name a game that is the opposite of cool. If you said "bingo," you'd be wrong. Sybil Nicholson and Shelly Brown, staffers at the LA Weekly, are attempting to wrestle the game of pure luck from the embrace of retirement homes nationwide via their monthly fundraising party, Rock & Roll Bingo.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, after spending virtually his entire adult life in one job, Craig Chaquico found himself looking for a new career direction. From 1974 to 1990, Chaquico had a lucrative and secure gig as lead guitarist for Jefferson Starship (later just Starship). The Bay Area band, which began as an offshoot of the '60s countercultural icon Jefferson Airplane, scored 13 gold and platinum albums during a tenure marked by stylistic shifts and frequent personnel shake-ups.
IMAGE
May 24, 2009
What's Grace Slick been up to in the years since Woodstock and the Jeffersons (Airplane and Starship)? Perhaps that's the question that drew a crowd to Santa Monica's Gallery 319 on May 16 for "Grace Slick's White Rabbit Art and Tea Party." The star (pictured on the cover with daughter China) and a cluster of "Alice in Wonderland"-themed paintings were there as an answer. -- latimes.com/image See more images from the Photo Booth and Grace Slick's Tea Party.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
She once performed topless in the rain so she wouldn't ruin her silk blouse, and she threatened to spike President Nixon's tea with LSD. But that was a lifetime ago for Grace Slick, the steely psychedelic rocker who added enough salt to her words to wither a seasoned sailor. These days, she has tamed that wild child. And she's turned to painting to get her creative urges out.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, after spending virtually his entire adult life in one job, Craig Chaquico found himself looking for a new career direction. From 1974 to 1990, Chaquico had a lucrative and secure gig as lead guitarist for Jefferson Starship (later just Starship). The Bay Area band, which began as an offshoot of the '60s countercultural icon Jefferson Airplane, scored 13 gold and platinum albums during a tenure marked by stylistic shifts and frequent personnel shake-ups.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | Associated Press
Former Jefferson Starship lead singer Grace Slick was released on bail Saturday morning after being booked on charges of felony assault and felony brandishing a weapon at a police officer. Officers from the Tiburon Police Department went to the singer's Marin County home after receiving a call at 3:30 a.m. Saturday from an apparently intoxicated man who said a drunken woman was firing a shotgun in the house, the police report said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | MARY CAMPBELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the truth is found to be lies And all the joy within you dies Don't you want somebody to love? --Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love" Her voice sounded like a hurricane rushing through a tunnel. There was a fury in Grace Slick's singing, even though Jefferson Airplane loved everybody. Slick wore her attitude the way others of the psychedelic age wore a peace button. "White Rabbit" made her rock's reigning acid queen, and 25 years later, she's retired from music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Paul Kantner held up a headline from the Weekly World News tabloid for his fellow members of the just re-formed Jefferson Airplane: "1960s Hippies and Radicals Were UFO Aliens." The five ex-hippies, gathered at a Canoga Park recording studio, had a good laugh. Twenty years ago, the Airplane--perhaps the most overtly political of the San Francisco hippie bands, and certainly the most commercially successful--probably did seem like a bunch of aliens to Middle America. "We are your parents' worst nightmare," provocative singer Grace Slick quipped at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1989 | Claudia Puig
Grace Slick on the title of Jefferson Airplane's comeback album, "Jefferson Airplane": "We considered 'Helmets Without Heads,' 'Experiments in Terror' and 'Save Rob Lowe."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Matt Diehl, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"People used to say nobody can sing my songs but me — they're too personal," Joni Mitchell explained last week during a rare interview. Apparently, nobody told John Kelly not to try adapting her songs. The renowned Obie Award-winning actor and performance artist has been belting out Mitchell's songs for more than 20 years. This weekend, the New York-based Kelly concludes the L.A. run of his acclaimed solo tribute to the iconic, iconoclastic singer-songwriter, "Paved Paradise: The Art of Joni Mitchell," at Renberg Theatre.
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