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Grades Education

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Bar Assn. has told Chapman University that it has "grave doubt" that the university's fledgling law school has a competent faculty capable of "effective teaching." In a letter explaining why the law school fell short of earning ABA accreditation, the bar association decried the school's lack of comprehensive peer review and evaluation that would assess the faculty's legal scholarship and teaching methods.
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NATIONAL
October 4, 2009 | Washington Post
If you have ever rolled your eyes when your child says a teacher's grade was unfair, you might want to think again. Your child might be right. Douglas Reeves, an expert on grading systems, conducted an experiment with more than 10,000 educators that he says proves just how subjective grades can be. Reeves asked teachers and administrators in the United States, Australia, Canada and South America to determine a final semester grade for...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ and MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A battle over academic standards at Irvine Valley College has landed in Superior Court, with a veteran writing professor suing administrators for raising a student's grade. Hugh Glenn, who has been teaching at the college since its founding 25 years ago, gave a student a "D" for a class taken in spring, 1991. The student had successfully completed all course requirements except submitting an acceptable term paper, Glenn said.
OPINION
June 6, 2005
'Re "A Formula for More Math Teachers," June 1: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger deserves widespread congratulations for his proposal to get more credentialed math and science teachers in our public schools to alleviate the chronic shortage. Over half of California high schools have teachers of physics who do not even have a minor in physics. Schwarzenegger's plan to have fully qualified science and math teachers after four years of college, rather than the usual five or six, is a great step forward, as is his proposal to have paid internships and forgivable loans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a test of academic standards, a veteran Irvine Valley College writing professor urged a Superior Court commissioner Wednesday to reinstate a failing course grade he gave a student in 1991. Hugh W. Glenn, who has taught writing at Irvine Valley College for 13 years, sued Saddleback Community College District officials last year over their decision to change, without his permission, the student's course grade from a failing "D" to a passing "C."
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | RAJIV CHANDRASEKARAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Stanford University senior Cory Sammons knew he was in over his head as soon as he opened the final exam in his introductory physics class two years ago. Juggling three other classes, holding down a part-time job and playing on the ice hockey team, the 22-year-old engineering major had not spent much time reading his textbook or memorizing formulas. So Sammons nonchalantly did what many Stanford students do in such a situation--he deliberately flunked the test.
SPORTS
November 30, 1988 | LAURIE DUNCAN, Times Staff Writer
College athletes, especially basketball and football players, spend more time on their sports in season than they do on their classes and get lower grades than students involved in other time-consuming extracurricular activities, a year-long study by the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. showed. The study, based on confidential questionnaires from 4,083 college athletes as well as students in other activities at 42 NCAA member institutions, was the first of its kind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District is dropping A-to-F letter grades in favor of a 4-to-1 rating system for all elementary students, officials said Tuesday, calling it a more precise gauge of academic progress and an effort to more closely adhere to state standards. Under the new system, already in use at year-round schools and due to be expanded districtwide next month, a top score of 4 means a student is "advanced, exceeds standards."
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
A man armed with two semiautomatic guns and apparently distraught over his son's grades opened fire at an elementary school Friday, wounding two officers before surrendering, authorities said. It was the second school shooting in Texas in a week. Terrified children and staff barricaded themselves in classrooms at Piney Point Elementary School, where the gunman's son is a second-grader. Others fled the school grounds. No children were hurt.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is agreement on one thing here on the lush seacoast of immaculate Marin, California's richest and perhaps loveliest county: The local school district is in terrible trouble. In this region of tall trees and big houses, fancy cars and fair complexions, nearly a third of the students in the district are in special education classes, overall performance is way below state standards and tempers are near the boiling point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2005 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
When ponytail-sporting, self-professed academic slouch Micah Roth was approached by his history teacher about joining the Academic Decathlon squad at El Camino Real High School -- the reigning national champions -- he was dumbfounded. "Have you seen my grades?" Roth, 17, recalls saying, referring to his C grade-point average. The teacher had indeed seen Roth's marks, and they were precisely why coaches at the Woodland Hills school wanted him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A second Corona del Mar High School student was taken into custody Wednesday on suspicion of hacking into a school computer to change grades, Newport Beach police said. Detectives escorted a senior, whom police would not identify because of his age, from the campus and, after questioning, released him to his parents, Sgt. Steve Shulman said. Students paid several hundred dollars for the grade changes, Shulman said.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A worker in Southern University's registrar's office took money to change grades for 541 current and former students, the school's chancellor said. The scandal probably will cost at least some students their degrees and could lead to criminal charges. Undergraduate and graduate students at the nation's largest historically black university were implicated, and some paid to have as many as 20 grades changed, Chancellor Edward Jackson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2004 | Ramin Setoodeh, Special to The Times
Derivatives and integrals aren't Stanford University student Mark Dominik's area of expertise. So when he enrolled three years ago in a calculus course, he hit the books -- and made good use of his professor's office hours. On the day of the final, "No one's pencil was down when the professor called time," recalled Dominik, who studies French and Italian literature. "It was a fair test, but it was a hard test."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Today's college freshmen got more A's than ever in high school while studying a record low number of hours in their senior year, according to a national survey by UCLA. But they may not be any smarter than those of past generations. Instead, frenzied competition for college admission has inflated grades and trained students to become experts at winning A's, say the survey's director and college students and officials in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2002 | Jenifer Ragland, Times Staff Writer
It's a problem that has been around as long as students have been applying to college: the lost high school transcript. Teenagers complain about it. Admissions counselors agonize over it. Last year, Hollywood took it on with the comedy "Orange County," in which a high-achieving student's hopes of going to Stanford are threatened when his school botches the transcript transmission.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 13-year-old boy has been arrested after shooting his father to death during an argument over a report card the child had hidden, police homicide detectives said. The report card dispute may have served as the "catalyst" for Monday night's shooting, National City Police Detective Lanny Roark said, but he emphasized that the violence "did not hinge solely on the one report card incident." Investigators did not specify other circumstances surrounding the shooting.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amid an outcry from students, professors at UC Santa Cruz voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to institute mandatory letter grades for the first time in the 35-year history of the decidedly unconventional school. The Academic Senate, the faculty's governing body, voted 154 to 77 to require letter grades in three-fourths of all classes, beginning in the fall of 2001. Remaining classes could be taken on a pass/fail basis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2002 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standardized test scores for first-graders in the Los Angeles Unified School District rose this year, according to figures released Tuesday. The California Department of Education does not require first-graders to take the Stanford 9 exam because studies have shown that test results for children under age 8 are unreliable. Los Angeles school district Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2002 | DOUG SMITH and LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A wave of school bond measures won voter approval in Tuesday's California primary election, bolstering the hopes of education advocates that decades of lean times for school construction may be ending. Voters approved 50 of 57 local school construction bond measures for kindergarten through 12th-grade districts and 13 of 14 for community college districts, according to School Services of California, a company that provides information to school systems. All told, the K-12 bonds represented $3.
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