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Grades Education

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District is dropping A to F letter grades in favor of a 4 to 1 system for all elementary students, officials said Tuesday, calling the new system a more precise gauge of academic progress and an effort to more closely adhere to state standards. Under the new system, already in use at year-round schools and due to be expanded districtwide next month, a top score of 4 means a student "exceeds standards."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District is dropping A-to-F letter grades in favor of a 4-to-1 rating system for all elementary students, officials said Tuesday, calling it a more precise gauge of academic progress and an effort to more closely adhere to state standards. Under the new system, already in use at year-round schools and due to be expanded districtwide next month, a top score of 4 means a student is "advanced, exceeds standards."
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one who crossed paths with Roosevelt High School senior Rodrigo Banuelos Jr. completely escaped the effects of his fatal shooting May 24. Banuelos' four younger siblings still alternate from rage to fear to grief. A 5-year-old nephew dreams of revenge. Four classmates were so upset by the sight of his empty desk that they cut homeroom class for the rest of the semester. Fifty students asked to speak to a counselor.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Youngsters seeking work at more than 10,000 businesses, from McDonald's to IBM, are finding that bad grades can be costly. Companies, worried that poor academic performance and lax attendance could be indicators of an employment risk, are requesting high school records. Employers hope they're sending a message to high school students and recent graduates that school performance and commitment to learning matter--even in today's tight job market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District officials on Monday unveiled the largest urban education reform program in U.S. history--their plan for ending social promotion and launching intervention programs for 139,000 students in danger of being held back in June 2000. Officials had worried that the $71-million effort, which aims to end social promotion a year earlier than the rest of the state, could collapse without the involvement of parents citywide.
SPORTS
March 28, 1999 | Eric Sondheimer
Part of high school sports lore involves coaches and athletes finding ways to change grades when eligibility is threatened. A top athlete learns he's ineligible and lobbies a teacher to raise his grade if he completes extra credit. A coach appeals to a teacher to take a second look at a grade, pleading that if the athlete is declared ineligible, he might drop out of school. Neither scenario is acceptable to Myra Fullerton, the new principal at Taft High.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already a year behind in course work after two years at Viadrina University here, Ilina Pohlman looks well on her way to meeting the national standard of taking six or seven years to earn a four-year degree. College education is free in Germany to any student--German or foreign--who has earned a high school diploma. And without a grading system to spotlight laggards, or much promise of a job after graduation, Germany's institutions of higher learning have become havens for eternal students.
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS and SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes winning just isn't good enough. That's the hard lesson Richmond High School's basketball coach says he decided to teach his players--all 45 of them, on three teams--by locking them out of their gymnasium and canceling their games and practices in a year when the Oilers' record so far is 13-0.
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