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Grades Education

NEWS
January 20, 2000 | DOUG SMITH and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Senior Los Angeles school officials said they have further scaled back once ambitious plans to end social promotion this year by declaring that English will be the only subject considered, and only students with an F will be held back.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Like neckties and hemlines, the school report card changes with the trends of the moment. Of late, the fashion has been toward soft-toned--some would say fluffy--grading as educators have emphasized self-esteem and low-pressure learning. But a new state policy requiring schools to flunk students who do not to meet academic standards is forcing districts to toughen their grading systems. The promotion policy will go into effect across the state next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Like neckties and hemlines, the school report card changes with the trends of the moment. Of late the fashion has been toward soft-toned--some would say fluffy--grading as educators emphasize self-esteem and low-pressure learning. But a new state policy requiring schools to flunk students who fail to meet academic standards is forcing districts to toughen up their grading systems. The promotion policy will go into effect across the state next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A new four-point grading system linking student evaluations to state standards is causing consternation among many Los Angeles elementary school teachers and parents who complain that it has been poorly implemented and makes excessive demands, especially on the youngest students. Teachers and parents seem generally positive about the overall goal of tying grades to the new state standards.
NEWS
December 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
It doesn't have a football team, ROTC military training or required grades. But now professors at notoriously liberal UC Santa Cruz are seeking to change that. At least the grades part. More than a third of the university's 588 faculty members pushed Friday for a vote on a policy change to require that all 11,000 students receive grades. Professors met and decided later in the day to postpone the vote so they could gather more input from students and staff.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
If the Los Angeles Unified School District were to completely stop promoting students who are not ready to move up a grade, roughly 50%--or about 350,000 students--would be held back, top district administrators said Tuesday. More than two-thirds of eighth-graders would be flunked if social promotions were fully ended, according to the administrators, who based their figures on a recent analysis by the district's staff, which examined standardized test results and trends in district grades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District is dropping A to F letter grades in favor of a 4 to 1 system for all elementary students, officials said Tuesday, calling the new system a more precise gauge of academic progress and an effort to more closely adhere to state standards. Under the new system, already in use at year-round schools and due to be expanded districtwide next month, a top score of 4 means a student "exceeds standards."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District is dropping A-to-F letter grades in favor of a 4-to-1 rating system for all elementary students, officials said Tuesday, calling it a more precise gauge of academic progress and an effort to more closely adhere to state standards. Under the new system, already in use at year-round schools and due to be expanded districtwide next month, a top score of 4 means a student is "advanced, exceeds standards."
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