Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGrades Education
IN THE NEWS

Grades Education

BUSINESS
August 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Youngsters seeking work at more than 10,000 businesses, from McDonald's to IBM, are finding that bad grades can be costly. Companies, worried that poor academic performance and lax attendance could be indicators of an employment risk, are requesting high school records. Employers hope they're sending a message to high school students and recent graduates that school performance and commitment to learning matter--even in today's tight job market.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District officials on Monday unveiled the largest urban education reform program in U.S. history--their plan for ending social promotion and launching intervention programs for 139,000 students in danger of being held back in June 2000. Officials had worried that the $71-million effort, which aims to end social promotion a year earlier than the rest of the state, could collapse without the involvement of parents citywide.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already a year behind in course work after two years at Viadrina University here, Ilina Pohlman looks well on her way to meeting the national standard of taking six or seven years to earn a four-year degree. College education is free in Germany to any student--German or foreign--who has earned a high school diploma. And without a grading system to spotlight laggards, or much promise of a job after graduation, Germany's institutions of higher learning have become havens for eternal students.
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS and SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes winning just isn't good enough. That's the hard lesson Richmond High School's basketball coach says he decided to teach his players--all 45 of them, on three teams--by locking them out of their gymnasium and canceling their games and practices in a year when the Oilers' record so far is 13-0.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In its longest meeting on record, and one of its most contentious, the Los Angeles Board of Education begrudgingly approved funds to reduce class size in the ninth grade but put other initiatives on hold to reserve money for a teacher pay raise. Deliberating into the early morning Wednesday, the board voted to temporarily set aside about $28 million of Supt. Ruben Zacarias' educational initiatives--just enough to leave room for an additional 1% salary increase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County's fledgling Cal State campus has embarked on a first-ever campaign to better prepare local high school students for college-level work. Although still years away from launching a four-year university, Cal State Channel Islands has joined with the Santa Paula Union High School District to sharpen math and English skills of 11th-graders to help them gain early entry into the university system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1998 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About a dozen parents protested Monday against the Compton school district's plans to keep their children back a year because of poor scores on a standardized reading test, despite the students' good evaluations from teachers earlier in the year. The parents presented student grade reports that they said showed teachers recently doctored earlier class grades to bring them in line with poor results on reading tests announced in June.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alison Moody had to settle for a 4.5 grade-point average because of her dancing. Four years on the dance team meant two class periods each year dedicated to practice for the teen now newly graduated from Tustin High School. That's two grades of 4.0 each year, pulling down an average that otherwise would have been a lot closer to 5.0. "It's a little unfair to students who want to be involved," said Moody, 17, who heads to UCLA in the fall.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Usually, it's the teachers doing the testing. But recently, 1,800 aspiring teachers here took a state-mandated certification exam--and more than half of them flunked. The ensuing furor saw grown policy-makers act like parents whose children came home with failing grades. Some said the Massachusetts Teachers Test, administered by National Evaluation Systems of Amherst, Mass., was way too hard, and demanded that the grading curve be lowered.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|