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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
An innovative way of getting graffiti removed has proved so successful that the City Council did not even discuss it this week when the contract was up for renewal. Members unanimously approved having the San Gabriel Valley Boys and Girls Club keep doing the job. "To date, the services provided to the city of Cypress have been excellent, with all graffiti called in by 8:30 a.m. removed that same day," Public Works Director Mark Christoffels said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
An innovative way of getting graffiti removed has proved so successful that the City Council did not even discuss it this week when the contract was up for renewal. Members unanimously approved having the San Gabriel Valley Boys and Girls Club keep doing the job. "To date, the services provided to the city of Cypress have been excellent, with all graffiti called in by 8:30 a.m. removed that same day," Public Works Director Mark Christoffels said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1993
The graffiti issue is proving to be ugly, expensive and visceral, prompting outrage throughout Orange County. Fortunately, it is gaining recognition from government agencies that rightly are taking steps to crack down on "taggers." For example, Orange, which may have to lay off dozens of workers to balance its budget, has approved a $200,000 graffiti cleanup and enforcement program. Santa Ana has budgeted $1.2 million for graffiti removal, an increase of nearly 50% over last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1993
The graffiti issue is proving to be ugly, expensive and visceral, prompting outrage throughout Orange County. Fortunately, it is gaining recognition from government agencies that rightly are taking steps to crack down on "taggers." For example, Orange, which may have to lay off dozens of workers to balance its budget, has approved a $200,000 graffiti cleanup and enforcement program. Santa Ana has budgeted $1.2 million for graffiti removal, an increase of nearly 50% over last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990
It's sort of like Dad making Junior wash the car for not keeping his room clean--there's a certain neatness to it, both literally and figuratively. At the suggestion last week of Supervisor Gaddi A. Vasquez, Orange County is studying an ordinance to impose jail sentences and stiff fines on repeat graffiti scribes who practice their "art" in unincorporated areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Never mind that Mission Viejo had not experienced graffiti until last month, when a group of local high school students peppered the master-planned community with it for a week. The Mission Viejo City Council has deemed the graffiti problem so potentially serious that it took emergency steps Monday. First, it ordered the city staff to immediately set up a 24-hour "anti-graffiti" hot line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2000
While overall I appreciated Jerry Hicks' July 10 column on dealing with the blight of graffiti in Orange County, there was a glaring inconsistency. In the first part of the article, Hicks quoted experts who said that the "broken window" effect should be avoided, i.e. that blight breeds blight, broken windows breed more broken windows, and likewise graffiti encourages more graffiti. Hence, it needs to be removed quickly. I wholeheartedly agree. But later in the article, a national anti-crime group is quoted as recommending that one should not remove graffiti on one's own. "The police need to document what's there for future prosecution," i.e., live with graffiti on your property until the police have the time to come out and document it. Please, no!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001
In the month following the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, the Orange County Human Relations Commission received 24 reports of hate-related incidents involving people perceived to be from the Middle East. The commission says it had never before recorded that many cases toward that community. Given the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 and the patriotic reaction to them, some residents might conclude that the high incidence is understandable. It's not.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: An athletes' night out at Windows on the Bay restaurant in Newport Beach. The Friday cocktail party raised funds for two local charities, the Newport Beach Police Volunteer Program and Orange County Works, which helps find jobs for foster children and at-risk youths. Sports night: A dozen sports figures, including basketball stars Shaquille O'Neal of the Los Angeles Lakers and Karl Malone of the Utah Jazz, towered over about 300 people. Party-goers dined and danced until 1 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK
The rising cost of removing spray-paint graffiti in Orange County has prompted one supervisor to propose a first-of-its-kind abatement program that would send County Jail inmates out to clean up the scrawl that mysteriously appears on walls, buildings and park benches. The jail crews would be on call to clean up graffiti--much of it gang-related--in the county's 29 cities. Supervisor Gaddi H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So-called "graffiti art" has gotten the brushoff from the City Council, which heeded arguments from police who charge that the program led to an increase in illegal tagging. After a long and contentious meeting that didn't end until after midnight, the council voted 6-1 early Tuesday to end the city's controversial Sea Wall Art Program. That program, begun about a year and a half ago, allowed people to get free city permits to paint on seawalls near the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY and KEVIN JOHNSON
Alarmed at the proliferation of graffiti in Orange County, state Sen. John R. Lewis (R-Orange) has introduced legislation that would strip convicted minors of their driver's licenses and make parents accountable for teen-age taggers. Lewis' bill comes as cities throughout Orange County grapple with a dramatic increase in spray-painted graffiti that experts say is more the product of a nationwide teen-age fad than an explosion of gang activity.
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