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Graffiti Problem

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NEWS
July 10, 1994
Surely, you must be aware of the severe graffiti problem in our city. Therefore, why does The Times persist in aggravating the problem by posing people for news pictures in front of graffitied walls and buildings? Another glaring example of this practice is the large photo of mariachi Jose Jesus Vargas ("El Mariachi," June 26) posed with graffiti in the background. Please be sensitive to the needs in our community by not publicizing, popularizing and glorifying graffiti in the pages of The Times.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2010 | By Amina Khan
When taggers spray-painted the windows of Rosa Bobbio's tiny upholstery shop in Anaheim, she called the police, who told her it was the city's responsibility. But the city told her she owed it $466.66 in fines and fees for not replacing her defaced windows at Century Custom Upholstery. Bobbio's experience is similar to that of other business owners in Southern California who find themselves caught between the zero-tolerance policies of municipal governments and the persistent destruction of taggers.
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OPINION
March 11, 2007
Re "Cities are answering the scrawl," March 5 Kudos to Los Angeles and Graffiti Tracker Inc. for getting serious about the tagging problem. What isn't mentioned in the article is what form of punishment or rehabilitation taggers are subject to once they are caught and convicted. Instead of paying city workers to clean up the graffiti, the taggers themselves should be sent out to scrub off their own work and repaint, just so they can see what a fun job it is. I have no sympathy for these "building rapists" and think the more severe the punishment, the better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
Opening a new front in the city's efforts to reduce tagging, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved an ordinance requiring that all new homes include a finish that is resistant to spray paint unless the owners promise to remove any graffiti themselves. The measure, which was unanimously approved, extends a provision in the Los Angeles Municipal Code requiring that new commercial buildings and apartments be coated to a height of 9 feet with an impermeable material, such as ceramic tile, baked enamel or a chemical gloss.
NEWS
December 6, 1992
On Monday, Nov. 9, students arriving at Savannah Elementary School in the Rosemead School District found that vandals had covered their campus with graffiti over the weekend. Sixth-grade teacher Nancy Gates asked her class to write down their feelings and suggest solutions. Following are excerpts of their letters with the original grammar and spelling: Dear Los Angeles Times, . . . I feel that it is about time we start doing something about graffiti. People need to say something if they know something about graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
There was a time, not long ago, when a person could purchase a home for a quarter of a million dollars in West Los Angeles and not have to worry about someone spray-painting graffiti on it. But for Bob Levy and his neighbors in the well-tended Oxford Triangle community that borders Marina del Rey, those days are over. Just last week, someone called "Trippy" left his calling card on the side of Levy's garage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1991
In March, I volunteered to supervise crews from the county's Work Release Program to help get rid of all the graffiti on our streets and alleys. Since then we've already used a total of 405 gallons of paint. I don't think anyone in Oxnard wants the graffiti problem to get out of hand like it has in the Los Angeles area and I'm proud to help the city of Oxnard in this anti-graffiti program. But once these unwanted messages are removed, it is everyone's job to make sure these walls are kept clean and free from all this graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1993 | Dana Parsons
Two years ago I began a column on Supervisor Gaddi Vasquez, the son of a minister, by posing the question: "Whither goest thou, Gaddi?" Today, the more pressing question is: "Hast thou gone soft in the noodle, Gaddi?" The question two years ago related to Vasquez's thought processes about the direction of his political career. Today, I'm just wondering about Vasquez's thought processes, period.
NEWS
January 10, 1993
Excerpts from letters written by sixth-graders about graffiti at Rosemead's Savannah Elementary School (Times Dec. 6, 1992) inspired sophomore English teacher Karen Blumenfeld to propose an assignment in argumentative writing to her students at Ganesha High School in Pomona. Their views on graffiti, ranging from admiration to fear to disgust to resignation, came in a deluge of 88 letters. "Thank you for 'Children React to Graffiti Problem'--it led me to an exciting assignment in which nearly all students got involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2009 | James Wagner
For decades, the Palace Costume Co. in the Fairfax district has stood as a neighborhood landmark. Colorful murals and scenes painted on large wood panels adorned the buildings' facades, giving the shop the look of a movie set. The scenes depicted several members of the owner's family in period dress cavorting about in different historical settings, stretching back to the 15th century. The artwork cost roughly $80,000 and took four years to complete. But now it's all gone.
OPINION
March 11, 2007
Re "Cities are answering the scrawl," March 5 Kudos to Los Angeles and Graffiti Tracker Inc. for getting serious about the tagging problem. What isn't mentioned in the article is what form of punishment or rehabilitation taggers are subject to once they are caught and convicted. Instead of paying city workers to clean up the graffiti, the taggers themselves should be sent out to scrub off their own work and repaint, just so they can see what a fun job it is. I have no sympathy for these "building rapists" and think the more severe the punishment, the better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996
A pedestrian tunnel in Mission Hills that has become a congregating area for vagrants and gang members was targeted for closure in a motion introduced Tuesday by Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson. The tunnel under the San Diego Freeway at Stranwood Avenue, between San Fernando Mission Boulevard and Rinaldi Street has been the site of "crime, encampments and graffiti," according to the motion submitted by Bernson.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1996 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Phillips and Mark Ginchereau considered going into business together long before they were laid off, last September, from Marine Spill Response Corp. in Port Hueneme. It was only after the layoffs, however, that they truly saw the writing on the wall. And the writing was graffiti. Finding themselves out of work, Phillips and Ginchereau created Blast-Mor Industries, which they launched last month.
NEWS
July 10, 1994
Surely, you must be aware of the severe graffiti problem in our city. Therefore, why does The Times persist in aggravating the problem by posing people for news pictures in front of graffitied walls and buildings? Another glaring example of this practice is the large photo of mariachi Jose Jesus Vargas ("El Mariachi," June 26) posed with graffiti in the background. Please be sensitive to the needs in our community by not publicizing, popularizing and glorifying graffiti in the pages of The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When there's any hint of danger, such as the time he painted over graffiti on a freeway median in San Juan Capistrano, Phil Duke works alone. But whenever he gets a chance, the 46-year-old house painter takes the family along to help out on his two-year quest as Capistrano Beach's self-appointed top tag-buster. "I take the kids with me to show them how crummy graffiti looks," said Duke. "I've always been a hands-on kind of person and I try to do as much as I can with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1993 | JAMES MAIELLA JR., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An attempt by the Moorpark City Council to combat graffiti through a proposed ordinance has spawned a political battle in which one official called the law idiotic. The council on Wednesday will consider the ordinance, which is aimed at reducing the city's graffiti problem by criminalizing the possession of paints, markers and etching tools used to apply graffiti. The law would also force property owners to quickly remove the vandalism or be billed by the city for the work.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The corner of Rosecrans Avenue and Acacia Street in Compton is dominated by a Weber's Bread store, covered with blue and white checks like an enormous bag of white bread. City staff say the store would look better painted off-white with peach trim. Down the street is a beauty salon painted deep aqua, offset by scrawling black graffiti. Staff would prefer it off-white, maybe beige, again with peach trim.
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