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SCIENCE
April 16, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists are harnessing the power of a parasitic worm to design a microneedle device that's more than three times as powerful as conventional surgical staples -- without the risks and side effects. The technology, described online Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, could be used for delicate procedures such as skin grafts for burn victims and face transplants. They could even be used to deliver drugs into the body. Current post-op techniques come with major drawbacks.
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WORLD
January 13, 2014 | Laura King
In the labyrinthine alleyways of this ancient city's Grand Bazaar, currency dealer Sardar Kaya glanced around before making an impromptu confession: Even those like him, who daily turn volatility into profit, wonder if Turkey's biggest corruption scandal in recent memory has become too jarring a ride. "Sure, a crisis like this is good for business, if you are clever enough," he said, lounging against a column in the sprawling market's informal gold-and-currency trading district, where chaotic scenes unfolded last week as the Turkish lira touched an all-time low. "But you can also fall on the wrong side of it. " Many in Turkey are feeling the same way as they try to sort through the implications of a vast and many-tentacled graft inquiry that has jeopardized Turkey's once-thriving economy and shaken the foundations of state control -- most particularly, the near-absolute power that Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has enjoyed for more than a decade.
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NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Anterior cruciate ligament surgery is common among some athletes who tear the knee ligament during sports such as soccer or basketball. But when it comes to grafting a new tendon, which is better, one from the knee or the hamstring? The hamstring may have it, a study finds. In research presented at a recent meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine in San Diego, 180 people ranging from 13 to 52 years old who had ACL reconstruction surgery were followed for 15 years.
WORLD
December 26, 2013 | By Glen Johnson
GAZIANTEP, Turkey - An Istanbul prosecutor said Thursday that he had been removed from the investigation of corruption involving the families of high-ranking officials of the ruling Justice and Development Party. The complaint by prosecutor Muammar Akkas, a day after three senior government ministers were forced to resign when their sons were arrested in the graft investigation, signals increasing tension between his office and longtime government leaders concerned about a scandal that threatens to topple the government.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Abdurrahman Wahid walked out of a graft inquiry by senior lawmakers, saying he would not submit to the investigation because it was unconstitutional and politically motivated. Wahid, facing growing demands to resign, denied any wrongdoing when he reluctantly appeared before the panel, which is investigating his alleged involvement in two corruption scandals.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Canadian capital's best-known gadfly has succeeded in forcing authorities to charge a sports minister and 15 prominent police officials and politicians from Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's party with graft. Former businessman Glen Kealey battled for three years to have his allegations of corruption in the Progressive Conservative government taken seriously. On Wednesday, after a 17-day hearing, a justice of the peace gave him permission to press charges.
WORLD
July 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A Malaysian court acquitted a top tourism official charged with accepting free medical treatment in exchange for possible contracts, news reports said. Mirza Mohammed Taiyab, head of Malaysia's tourism promotion board, has been one of the most senior bureaucrats to face corruption charges in recent years amid pledges by the government to stamp out graft. Few prominent officials have been convicted so far. Mirza pleaded innocent in August last year to a charge of accepting free dental treatment, worth almost $4,200, in 2005 from a company that he allegedly gave contracts to. Kuala Lumpur Sessions Court Judge Zainal Abidin Kamarudin ruled that the prosecution had not proved its case against Mirza, The Star and New Straits Times newspapers reported.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Criminal charges were filed against a political ally of the late dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos. Eduardo Cojuangco was accused of fronting for Marcos to acquire stock in the Philippines' largest daily newspaper. The charges came just three days after Cojuangco, an estranged cousin of President Corazon Aquino, slipped into Manila, ending four years of exile in the United States. Cojuangco, 54, is charged with the unlawful acquisition of shares of stock in the Bulletin Today publishing company.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 |
A leader of China's national legislature is under investigation for alleged economic crimes, the government said Saturday. The announcement came a day before the National People's Congress--China's supreme legislative body--was to convene its annual session. Congress Vice Chairman Cheng Kejie was not reelected to the presidium of the legislature this year because he is suspected of having broken the law, legislative spokesman Zeng Jianhui said.
WORLD
July 27, 2008 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Before leaving for Chompovon Primary School on the outskirts of the capital, students say, their parents give them 10 to 15 cents of pocket money. That's enough to buy some breakfast cakes and rice -- and pay their teachers a few cents before they walk into class. The fee, a widespread practice in Cambodia's public schools, is a kind of informal toll that students must pay. If they don't, parents say, they risk receiving a lower grade or even being demoted. Here, schoolchildren are taught at an early age what it takes to get ahead.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Depending on where your sympathies lie, Chinese President Xi Jinping is either in the midst of an admirable campaign to rid the government of corruption or a cynical purge of his political enemies. The latest casualty is Zhou Yongkang, the feared domestic security czar under the previous government who was formally placed under investigation this month, according to numerous reports in the overseas media. The mottled-complexioned, square-jawed Zhou, 71, has long been the bête noire of Chinese liberals, blamed for excesses against dissidents and for rampant corruption in the state oil sector, where he was an official earlier in his career.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists are harnessing the power of a parasitic worm to design a microneedle device that's more than three times as powerful as conventional surgical staples -- without the risks and side effects. The technology, described online Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, could be used for delicate procedures such as skin grafts for burn victims and face transplants. They could even be used to deliver drugs into the body. Current post-op techniques come with major drawbacks.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - You could say that Michael Kohn has a leg up on Angels teammate Ryan Madson in their recoveries from Tommy John surgery. The relief pitchers underwent elbow reconstruction on consecutive days last April, Madson with Dr. Lewis Yocum, the Angels' team physician and an expert on the procedure, and Kohn with Dr. James Andrews, the renowned Alabama surgeon whose patients include Michael Jordan, Jack Nicklaus and Robert Griffin III. ...
WORLD
November 12, 2012 | Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - A mid-level public security official earning $19,000 a year acquires 21 houses, valued at more than $6 million. The former railroad minister is alleged to have accumulated $250 million in bribes, which he reportedly hoped to use to buy his way into the Politburo. Families of Politburo members are revealed to have fortunes in the hundreds of millions. Corruption is very much the hot topic at the 18th Communist Party congress underway in Beijing. Once too sensitive to be discussed in public, graft is now the subject of grandiloquent editorials in state-owned media.
WORLD
October 31, 2012 | By Sarah Delaney, Los Angeles Times
ROME - The Italian Parliament on Wednesday approved anti-corruption legislation aimed at addressing a series of scandals involving graft, extravagant misuse of public funds and rampant cronyism that have outraged the economically distressed nation. The new regulations call for stiffer prison sentences for public officials found guilty of bribe-taking, abuse of office or influence peddling. They also add the crime of corruption between private parties, as well as protective measures for whistle-blowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2012 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Hector Becerra and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
Officials in the small town of Cudahy took part in brazen and widespread corruption, including accepting cash bribes hidden in a shoe box, abusing drugs at City Hall and throwing out absentee ballots that favored election challengers, according to court documents filed by federal prosecutors. The allegations paint an alarming picture of a city government permeated by graft far more extensive than was laid out when three city officials were arrested last month for allegedly accepting $17,000 in bribes from a medical marijuana dispensary owner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2012 | By Rosanna Xia and Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
The worst disease known to the citrus industry may have arrived in California on a bud of friendship. A graft of pomelo - a symbol of good fortune and prosperity in many Asian cultures - was the likely source of the state's first documented case of huanglongbing, a citrus disease with no known cure, say researchers involved in the investigation. The suspected plant shoot, or budwood, was passed freely among San Gabriel Valley church friends who loved to garden and experiment with hybridization, according to residents.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - You could say that Michael Kohn has a leg up on Angels teammate Ryan Madson in their recoveries from Tommy John surgery. The relief pitchers underwent elbow reconstruction on consecutive days last April, Madson with Dr. Lewis Yocum, the Angels' team physician and an expert on the procedure, and Kohn with Dr. James Andrews, the renowned Alabama surgeon whose patients include Michael Jordan, Jack Nicklaus and Robert Griffin III. ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2012 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives and Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The negotiations went down during weeks of profane and elliptical conversation, an FBI informant asking for a hard figure: How much cash would it take to bribe Cudahy officials into letting him open his marijuana dispensary? Two council members and a longtime city official were arrested by federal agents Friday morning and charged with bribery. But documents released as part of the criminal complaint suggest that the malfeasance is far more widespread. More than 130 pages of wiretapped conversations depict a city rife with corruption, as well as bribery so pervasive that it's practically expected.
OPINION
June 10, 2012 | By Sarah Chayes
In the year since the Arab Spring, attention has been riveted on one issue above all others: the place of religious practice in public life. In Tunisia, where the movement began, full-face and body veils, now often worn complete with gloves, are increasingly visible on the streets - an exotic sight for locals and foreigners alike. And the secular opposition seems increasingly strident in its conviction that the Islamist government is driving the country the way of Iran. But it wasn't religion that set off the Jasmine Revolution; it was acute economic injustice and the pervasive and structured corruption that helped produce it. The fate of Tunisia, and its neighbors, may depend most on whether that lingering problem is addressed.
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