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BUSINESS
May 10, 1989
Soviet Grain Buys Eased: The Soviet Union, which broke its record last week for buying U.S. corn and wheat, could easily gain permission to exceed the current ceiling on purchases, Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter said. The Kremlin has bought a record 19.3 million metric tons of American grain since the trade year opened Oct. 1. The Soviets recently received permission to buy up to 24 million tons of grain without needing advance U.S. approval. "If the Soviets need something higher than a 24-million-ton ceiling, I doubt whether they would have much difficulty obtaining it," said Yeutter, who labeled as "incorrect" some reports that the Soviets had sought a 30-million-ton ceiling in late April.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 2014
Chinese state-owned food giant Cofco has agreed to buy a controlling stake in Dutch grain trader Nidera, the latest move in China's global quest to supply its growing food demand. The deal, reportedly worth close to $1.3 billion , would give Cofco 51% control of the Rotterdam-based Nidera, which has infrastructure in major grain producing regions in South America and Central Europe. China needs more soybeans and corn to feed its growing livestock industry. Rising incomes and urbanization has helped double per-capita meat consumption in China since 1992 to 52.5 kilograms (about half the amount in the U.S.)
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BUSINESS
February 28, 2014
Chinese state-owned food giant Cofco has agreed to buy a controlling stake in Dutch grain trader Nidera, the latest move in China's global quest to supply its growing food demand. The deal, reportedly worth close to $1.3 billion , would give Cofco 51% control of the Rotterdam-based Nidera, which has infrastructure in major grain producing regions in South America and Central Europe. China needs more soybeans and corn to feed its growing livestock industry. Rising incomes and urbanization has helped double per-capita meat consumption in China since 1992 to 52.5 kilograms (about half the amount in the U.S.)
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Now that we've got a new flour mill in town - Grist & Toll in Pasadena - aspiring bread bakers and those who love them will want to invest in this third tome from Tartine master baker Chad Robertson, “Tartine Book No. 3: Modern Ancient Classic Whole” (Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 2013, 304 pages, $40). 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of Tartine Bakery & Cafe in San Francisco, and Robertson found himself wondering, “Where could we take our recipes next? Could we make them taste even better while adding more nutrition?
SCIENCE
July 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart
What is the federal forestry agency doing to help Dodger slugger Yasiel Puig? Well might you ask. It turns out that the Forest Products Laboratory, operated by the U.S. Forest Service, has been working with Major League Baseball Safety and Health Advisory Committee and the Major League Players Assn. to figure out how to reduce the frequency of bats breaking into dangerous projectiles. The research began in 2008, when wood experts at the federal lab examined what caused the big league maple bats to shatter.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Most pharmaceutical ads in biomedical journals may not be up to snuff as far as Food and Drug Administration guidelines are concerned, a study finds. Researchers examined 192 pharmaceutical ads for 82 individual products in 12 journals from November 2008 using criteria from the FDA's Prescription Drug Advertising Guidelines (excluded were ads for devices, over the counter medications and disease awareness). They also assessed ad content that related to safe prescribing. At least two people reviewed each ad. Only about 18% of the ads complied with all 20 FDA guidelines and about 58% didn't calculate serious risks of the drugs, including death.
HEALTH
August 16, 2010 | By Kathleen Clary Miller, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Medical science has determined that one cannot separate mental and emotional health from physical well-being. Which one of us hasn't suffered the bodily reaction to stress — felt the heart race when running late to an important meeting at work or experienced an adrenaline surge during a freeway delay? Feed the soul, not just the body: For me, a part of that is church. When I attend Sunday services, often my soul is refreshed; balance is restored. I need equilibrium because, ahem, as my daughters will aver, I tend to go a bit overboard on nutritional matters and require intervention.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | From Reuters
About $405 million worth of grain rots in China's state granaries every year while rats eat 1.5 million more tons, Yang Jike, the vice-governor of Anhui province, a leading grain-producing region, said in a newspaper interview Wednesday.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1985 | Associated Press
China's granaries are overflowing after a record harvest, the government said. Niu Ruofeng, director of the agricultural economics institute, said Chinese farmers grew more than 400 million metric tons of grain this year, up 12.5 million tons from a bumper crop in 1983 and more than state grain stores can accomodate. A metric ton is equal to 2.204.6 pounds.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1991 | From Reuters
World grain inventories are at their lowest levels since the mid-1970s and a crop failure in a major producing country could trigger a global food crisis, says a leading U.S. commodity trading house. "The current tight grain stocks situation . . . sets the stage for a world food crisis if any of the world's major producers experience significant crop production problems in 1992 or beyond," Cargill Inc., a Minneapolis, Minn.-based trading house, said.
OPINION
November 29, 2013 | By Lester R. Brown
India is now the world's third-largest grain producer after China and the United States. The adoption of higher-yielding crop varieties and the spread of irrigation have led to this remarkable tripling of output since the early 1960s. Unfortunately, a growing share of the water that irrigates three-fifths of India's grain harvest is coming from wells that are starting to go dry. This sets the stage for a major disruption in food supplies for India's growing population. In recent years about 27 million wells have been drilled, chasing water tables downward in every Indian state.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By John Verive
Geek icons joined forces with Stone Brewing Co. to brew a collaboration beer to kick off Comic-Con International: San Diego , and Stone Farking Wheaton w00tstout is the nutty result. I sat down with "Star Trek: The Next Generation" actor, science fiction author and home brewer Wil Wheaton to share a bottle of the pecan-laced imperial stout and to discuss the genesis of the project and what it was like to turn pro brewer for a day. Wheaton said he took up home brewing more than two years ago as a way to connect with his adult son, and that he was quickly hooked by brewing's melange of art and science.
SCIENCE
July 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart
What is the federal forestry agency doing to help Dodger slugger Yasiel Puig? Well might you ask. It turns out that the Forest Products Laboratory, operated by the U.S. Forest Service, has been working with Major League Baseball Safety and Health Advisory Committee and the Major League Players Assn. to figure out how to reduce the frequency of bats breaking into dangerous projectiles. The research began in 2008, when wood experts at the federal lab examined what caused the big league maple bats to shatter.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Bob Klein has had his share of food passions. The owner of Oakland's Oliveto restaurant has been consumed by finding the best meat, fish, wine, and, of course, salumi (for years Fra' Mani's Paul Bertolli was his chef). And he was into the whole nose-to-tail thing way early. But now he's found a new love - wheat. And his Community Grains whole-grain pasta is popping up on menus and in stores around Southern California, including Mozza and Whole Foods, as well as online.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Publix Super Markets has recalled its Publix Deli Tri Fruit and Grain Salad since it may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Publix received notification of the potential contamination from their supplier, Allison's Gourmet Kitchens. Publix Deli Tri Fruit and Grain Salad, UPC # 41415-39662, was distributed in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee. Product was sold in pre-packaged 12-ounce containers, and this recall involves all product sold from December 2012 through March 26, 2013.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Oh, Will, you bad, bad Bard. All the time I've been defending you from the elitists and snobs who refuse to credit the idea that you, a mere glover's son, could have penned some of the most lyrical passages and memorable characters in the English language…. And how do you pay me back for sticking up for you and your authorship? As it turns out, by acting like a greedy, grasping robber baron. Amid all the centuries of grousing that the world doesn't know very much about William Shakespeare the man, researchers at Aberystwyth University in Wales have unearthed perhaps a wee bit more that we would like to know.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2005 | Joseph Menn
The key equipment needed to load U.S. grain on ships for export through New Orleans-area ports is more than halfway to recovering from damage inflicted by Hurricane Katrina, officials said Wednesday. Land-based and floating grain elevators near the mouth of the Mississippi River could handle 63% as much grain by Wednesday as they could before the hurricane, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Rising costs for fuel, feed and fertilizer propelled grain prices to all-time highs in June, raising the overall price of crops and livestock by 16% this year compared with last year, a U.S. Department of Agriculture report showed Thursday. Grain prices gained 42% for the year overall. Corn sold for an average of $5.61 a bushel in June, up 69% from $3.32 in 2007. Soybeans sold for $14.20 a bushel, nearly double last year's figure of $7.56. Corn went for just $2.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
In discussions of getting people to eat more produce and whole grains, price often comes up as a barrier. Rand Corp. research released Tuesday shows that offering discounts on healthful foods increases the amounts people eat - and it appears also to reduce how much foods such as cookies and chips they eat too. The researchers looked at a program in South Africa that since 2009 has provided rebates of 10% or 25% to members of Discovery Health,...
BUSINESS
March 7, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
As a doctor, Jonathan Tam has a message for San Gabriel Valley residents: Eat your vegetables. Farm Cuisine, his new organic restaurant in Monterey Park, is trying to get cost-conscious Chinese diners to buy healthful organic takes on traditional Chinese dishes. But the pricier meals are a tough sell in the heavily Asian American valley, where more than 500 Chinese restaurants are in a pitched battle to offer authentic dishes at ever lower prices. JOIN A LIVE DISCUSSION AT 4 P.M. PT Area restaurants wear B and C food-safety grades like badges of honor, and diners line up for cheap fried pork dumplings and dim sum at $2 a plate.
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