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Gramm Rudman Amendment

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NEWS
August 1, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Senate, attempting to put teeth back into the Gramm-Rudman budget-balancing law, Friday approved new provisions that would force automatic spending cuts if Congress does not meet deficit targets. The 71-21 vote on the measure demonstrated that "there is a strong basis of support in the Congress and the country to mandate a balanced budget," said Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Tex.), one of the authors of the original legislation.
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NEWS
October 6, 1990 | TOM REDBURN and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States government pulled the plug on all but its most critical operations at midnight Friday after President Bush refused to sign emergency legislation to maintain federal spending following the defeat of a bipartisan budget accord. Bush's decision was announced at a late-night press briefing by White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater shortly after the Senate joined the House in approving a stopgap spending bill designed to keep the government running for another two weeks.
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NEWS
October 28, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress and the White House remained locked in an acrimonious budget stalemate over the capital gains tax Friday, even as the Treasury Department announced that the deficit for fiscal 1989 remained essentially unchanged for the third year in a row at $152.1 billion. Richard G. Darman, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, accused Democratic leaders in Congress of a "gross double standard" for resisting Bush's capital gains proposal.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a stunning defeat for President Bush and the leaders of both parties in Congress, the House early today rejected the new five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction plan. The vote was 254 to 179. A combination of conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats scuttled the accord worked out by White House officials and top-ranking members of Congress in marathon negotiations that ended Sunday.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | BOB ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite widespread assurances that Social Security would be exempt from the automatic government budget cuts threatened for Oct. 1, those cuts would delay the processing of benefit claims and cause a "drastic falloff of service" to the nation's 40 million Social Security beneficiaries, a confidential agency memorandum says. The Social Security Administration would be forced to furlough its employees for as much as 85 days during the year to achieve the savings of $1.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | from Associated Press
America's mayors Sunday gave initial approval to a broad and costly domestic agenda that asks Congress to repeal the Gramm-Rudman deficit-reduction law and to cut Social Security taxes for nearly 120 million workers. The more than 70 resolutions approved by the U.S. Conference of Mayors' key policy committee contain repeated pleas for a multibillion-dollar infusion of federal funds for anti-drug, housing, education and anti-poverty programs.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a stunning defeat for President Bush and the leaders of both parties in Congress, the House early today rejected the new five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction plan. The vote was 254 to 179. A combination of conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats scuttled the accord worked out by White House officials and top-ranking members of Congress in marathon negotiations that ended Sunday.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major breakthrough, budget negotiators tentatively agreed Saturday night on a bipartisan tax package that would scrap the capital gains tax cut sought by President Bush along with top-bracket tax rate hikes favored by Democrats, according to sources close to the talks.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a host of prickly ways, every American would feel the impact of the five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction package that budget negotiators are struggling to complete by Sunday night. Officials already have agreed on key elements that would, among other things, raise gasoline taxes, boost tobacco and alcohol levies, impose a new tax on purchases of luxury goods, require 33 million Medicare recipients to pay more for health coverage and limit subsidies to farmers.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As optimistic rumors swept the capital, White House and congressional budget negotiators were reported Thursday to be moving closer to a deficit-cutting agreement that would avert a $100-billion cutback in federal outlays on Monday. Even as the bargaining teams raced against the clock, however, Democratic and Republican sources cautioned that major issues still must be resolved before the two sides can achieve the bipartisan goal of a five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction package.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
The procedure that Congress must follow to enact the new bipartisan budget agreement into law is a complex and uncertain one. Here is how it is supposed to work: - The two houses must agree on a fiscal 1991 congressional budget resolution, which formally adopts the basic outlines of the bipartisan accord and orders the tax-writing and appropriations committees to enact enabling legislation.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major breakthrough, budget negotiators tentatively agreed Saturday night on a bipartisan tax package that would scrap the capital gains tax cut sought by President Bush along with top-bracket tax rate hikes favored by Democrats, according to sources close to the talks.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a host of prickly ways, every American would feel the impact of the five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction package that budget negotiators are struggling to complete by Sunday night. Officials already have agreed on key elements that would, among other things, raise gasoline taxes, boost tobacco and alcohol levies, impose a new tax on purchases of luxury goods, require 33 million Medicare recipients to pay more for health coverage and limit subsidies to farmers.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
White House and congressional negotiators inched closer to a deficit-reduction accord Friday in hopes of heading off $85 billion in mandated federal spending cuts on Monday, but they remained at an impasse on key issues, such as Social Security and capital gains taxes.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As things stand now, if Congress and the White House fail to reach a budget agreement by midnight Sunday, the federal government will have to slash its spending by a staggering $85 billion, causing sharp cutbacks in services that will quickly be felt by millions of Americans.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As optimistic rumors swept the capital, White House and congressional budget negotiators were reported Thursday to be moving closer to a deficit-cutting agreement that would avert a $100-billion cutback in federal outlays on Monday. Even as the bargaining teams raced against the clock, however, Democratic and Republican sources cautioned that major issues still must be resolved before the two sides can achieve the bipartisan goal of a five-year, $500-billion deficit-reduction package.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defying President Bush's veto threat, Democrats on the House Appropriations Committee voted Tuesday to delay for 20 days about $100 billion in automatic spending cuts that would otherwise be triggered without a bipartisan deficit-cutting agreement.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON
The scenario is a frightening one: A shutdown of the meat and poultry industry as U.S. inspectors are furloughed. Cancellation of federal scholarship grants for 1.4 million needy college students. Millions of infants and children deprived of immunization shots. A shortage of controllers brings long delays in air travel. A one-third cut in government payments to farmers, and lengthy unpaid leaves for nearly everyone in the federal work force. With U.S.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | MARCIDA DODSON and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Travelers flying in and out of Orange County's John Wayne Airport may find some flights canceled. People dependent on Social Security will get their checks on time, but if there's a problem, they will probably have a long delay finding out what went wrong. Taxpayers fighting the Internal Revenue Service might have to do battle just to see an agent because employees of that federal agency could be required to cut their work hours.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defying President Bush's veto threat, Democrats on the House Appropriations Committee voted Tuesday to delay for 20 days about $100 billion in automatic spending cuts that would otherwise be triggered without a bipartisan deficit-cutting agreement.
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